Doukhobor Genealogy Website  
 

Doukhobor Historical Maps

 

Historical maps are a important tool in genealogical research. They can provide clues to where our ancestors lived and where to look for written records about them. They can be used to locate settlements and geographic features, identify changing place names and political boundaries, and understand migration routes and settlement patterns. They are also a great visual aid, reference source and add extra interest to our research. The following collection of online historical maps has been specifically developed for Doukhobor genealogical study and research. Map boundaries, place names and markers have been accurately positioned and calibrated using topographic maps and GPS data. Note: use high resolution such as 800 x 600 at 16 bit color for best results.


 

Origins

 

Early Doukhobor Exiles in Russia, 1762-1802
Between 1762 and 1802, groups of Doukhobors from the South of Russia were exiled to the frontiers of the Empire. Some were deported north to the Isle of Ezel (Saaremaa) and the Fortress of Dünamünde (Daugavgrīva) in the Baltic, the Vyborg (Viipuri) district of Finland, Solovetsky Island and the Kola Peninsula. Others were sent south to the Fortress of Azov. Still others were banished east to Ekaterinburg, Nerchinsk, Lake Baikal, Tobolsk, Tomsk and Irkutsk in Siberia.  Download

 

The Doukhobors in Russia, 1802
By 1802, Doukhobors could be found in virtually all parts of Russia. The vast majority resided in the South Russian provinces of Ekaterinoslav, Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov), Tambov, Voronezh and the Don, with lesser numbers in the adjoining provinces of Astrakhan, Saratov, Penza, Orel, Kursk, Poltava, Kherson, Tavria and the Caucasus. As well, groups of Doukhobor exiles were settled on the northern, southern and eastern frontiers of the Empire.  Download

 


 

The Molochnaya

 

Doukhobor Resettlement to Tavria, 1802-1822

In 1802, Doukhobors from the provinces of Ekaterinoslav and Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) were permitted to settle in a separate colony in Tavria. This permission was gradually extended to other Doukhobors from Tambov, Voronezh and Azov in 1805, the Don in 1810, Kola Peninsula in 1815, the Caucasus in 1816, Finland in 1817, Siberia in 1818 and elsewhere until 1822, when further Doukhobor settlement to Tavria was suspended.  Download

 

Molochnaya Doukhobor Settlement, 1802-1845

In Tavria (present-day Zaporozhye province, Ukraine), the Doukhobors settled along the Molochnaya River in the Melitopol district. The area was known as Molochnye Vody (“Milky Waters”). There on the fertile steppe, they planted grain fields and fruit orchards and established nine villages as well as flour mills, textile mills, a stud farm and extensive livestock herds. Their landholdings totaled 131,417 acres.  Download

 


 

The Caucasus

 

Doukhobor Exile to the Caucasus, 1841-1845

In 1841-1845, Imperial Russian authorities deported 4,992 Doukhobors from the Melitopol district of Tavria province to the Caucasus. They were exiled in five parties of 800-900 persons each over the five year period. The 900-mile journey by horse and wagon took 70 days to complete. Upon their arrival in the Caucasus, the Doukhobors were assigned new areas of settlement in the Akhalkalaki and Borchalo districts of Tiflis province and the Kedabek district of Elizavetpol province. Download

 

Doukhobor Settlements in the Caucasus, 1841-1899

In the Caucasus, the Doukhobors settled in the mountain highlands of the Akhalkalaki and Borchalin districts of Tiflis province (present-day Georgia) in 1841-1843.  They also settled in the Gedabay district of Elizavetpol province (present-day Azerbaijan) in 1844-1845.  Later, in 1879-1880, Doukhobors from these provinces established new settlements in the Zarushat and Shuragel districts of Kars province (present-day Turkey).  Download

 

Doukhobor Settlements in the Georgian Republic

In 1841-1843, three thousand, five hundred Doukhobors from Tavria were exiled to the Akhalkalaki and Borchalin districts of Tiflis province, Russia. There in the cool mountain highlands, they raised extensive livestock herds and established nine villages. Their landholdings totaled 86,630 acres. Today this area is known as the Republic of Georgia.  Download

 

Doukhobor Settlements in the Azerbaijan Republic

In 1844-1845, one thousand Doukhobors from Tavria were exiled to Elizavetpol province, Russia. They were joined there by groups of Doukhobors exiled from elsewhere in Russia. There in the mountain lowlands, they planted grain fields and market gardens, raised extensive livestock herds and established four villages. Today this area is known as the Republic of Azerbaijan.  Download

 

Doukhobor Settlements in the Republic of Turkey

In 1879-1886, two thousand Doukhobors from Elizavetpol and Tiflis were permitted to resettle in the Shuragel and Zarushat districts of Kars province, Russia. There in the mountain lowlands, they planted grain fields and market gardens, raised extensive livestock herds and established six villages. Today this area is known as the Republic of Turkey.  Download

 


 

Cyprus

 

Doukhobor Settlements in Cyprus, 1898-1899

In August 1898, 1,126 Doukhobor refugees from Tiflis, Russia were permitted to settle on three farms in the Nicosia and Famagusta districts of the Mediterranean island of Cyprus (present-day Republic of Cyprus and Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus). However, the extreme heat and humidity combined with impure water and unsanitary housing proved unsuitable. Already destitute, impoverished and in a weakened state, 108 of the settlers perished from famine, disease and exhaustion. The following year, in April 1899, the remaining Doukhobors abandoned their temporary settlements and rejoined their brethren in Canada.  Download

 


 

Saskatchewan

 

Doukhobor Reserves in Saskatchewan, 1899-1918

In 1899, over 7,500 Doukhobors emigrated from the Caucasus to Canada in order to escape religious persecution. They settled in three blocks of land reserved for their use in the North-West Territories (present-day Province of Saskatchewan). This amounted to 773,400 acres of land on which the Doukhobors established 61 villages. In 1907, a crisis over land ownership resulted in 258,880 acres of Doukhobor reserve lands reverting back to the Crown. By 1918, the reserves were closed as Doukhobors relocated to individual homesteads or to British Columbia.  Download

 

North Colony, Saskatchewan

In 1899, 2,400 Doukhobors from Tiflis, Russia settled in the Pelly and Arran districts of Saskatchewan on 69,000 acres of homestead land reserved for their use. The area was known as the North Colony. It was also known as the Thunder Hill Colonyor Swan River Colony. There, they cleared the forest, planted grain fields and established twenty communal villages as well as a brickworks (1903), sawmill (1903), gristmills, linseed oil presses, blacksmith shops, granaries and barns. By 1918, the reserve was closed as Doukhobors relocated to individual homesteads or to British Columbia.  Download

 

South Colony, Saskatchewan

In 1899, 3,500 Doukhobors from Tiflis, Elizavetpol and Kars, Russia settled in the Canora, Veregin and Kamsack districts of Saskatchewan on 215,010 acres of homestead land reserved for their use. The area was known as the South Colony. It was also known as the Whitesand Colony or Yorkton Colony. There, they cleared the forest, planted grain fields and established thirty communal villages as well as a brickworks (1905), flourmill (1909), central warehouse and store, elevators, gristmills, linseed oil presses, blacksmith shops, granaries and barns. By 1918, the reserve was closed as Doukhobors relocated to individual homesteads or to British Columbia.  Download

 

Good Spirit Lake Annex, Saskatchewan

In 1899, 1,000 Doukhobors from Elizavetpol and Kars, Russia settled near Good Spirit Lake in the Buchanan district of Saskatchewan on 168,930 acres of homestead land reserved for their use. The area was known as the Good Spirit Lake Annex. There, they cleared the forest, planted grain fields and established eight communal villages as well as gristmills, blacksmith shops, granaries and barns. By 1918, the reserve was closed as Doukhobors relocated to individual homesteads or to British Columbia.  Download

 

Saskatchewan Colony, Saskatchewan

In 1899, 1,500 Doukhobors from Kars, Russia settled along the North Saskatchewan River in the Langham and Blaine Lake districts of Saskatchewan on 324,800 acres of homestead land reserved for their use. The area was known as the Saskatchewan Colony. It was also known as the Prince Albert Colony or Duck Lake Colony. There, they cleared the forest, planted grain fields and established thirteen communal villages as well as gristmills, blacksmith shops, granaries and barns. By 1918, the reserve was closed as Doukhobors relocated to individual homesteads or to British Columbia.  Download

 

Sheho and Insinger, Saskatchewan, 1909-1926

In 1909, Community Doukhobors purchased 1,280 acres of heavily-wooded land in the Sheho and Insinger districts of Saskatchewan. There, they established two large multi-family farmsteads, a single-family farmstead and a trading store. In winter, Doukhobor work crews cut the trees into cordwood and shipped them via the Canadian Pacific Railway to Yorkton to fuel the CCUB brickworks. In summer, the cleared land was sown into crop. The farm settlements were sold in 1926 after the land was completely cleared. Download

 

Kylemore, Saskatchewan, 1918-1938

In 1918, Community Doukhobors purchased 11,362 acres in the Kylemore district of Saskatchewan. There, they cleared the forest, planted grain fields and established fourteen communal villages as well as a central meeting house, trading store, grain elevator, blacksmith shops, granaries and barns. Following the demise of the CCUB in 1937-1938, the lands were sold and the villages were disbanded.  Download

 

Kelvington, Saskatchewan, 1921-1938

In 1921, Community Doukhobors purchased 8,000 acres of wooded land in the Kelvington district of Saskatchewan. There, they cleared the forest and planted grain and hay fields. No villages were established there; however, two single-family farmsteads were built to house the families stationed there. In 1930-1931, the CCUB sold 3,000 acres of the land to its members to farm independently. Following the demise of the CCUB in 1937-1938, the remaining land was sold.  Download

 


 

British Columbia

 

Doukhobor Settlements in British Columbia, 1908-1938

Beginning in 1908, Community Doukhobors purchased 19,000 acres of largely forested land in the Grand Forks, Castlegar and Slocan Valley areas of British Columbia. By 1912, over 8,000 Doukhobors had relocated there from Saskatchewan. They cleared the forest lands, planted orchards, vegetable gardens and grain fields and constructed seventy-four communal villages, each consisting of pairs of two-story houses with connecting courtyards plus smaller villages comprised of single dwellings. Following the demise of the CCUB in 1937-1938, the communal organization gradually declined.  By 1961-1963, the CCUB lands were sold and the villages were disbanded.  Download

 

Grand Forks, British Columbia, 1909-1938

In 1909, Community Doukhobors from Saskatchewan purchased 4,750 acres of land in the Spencer, Outlook and West Grand Forks districts of British Columbia. There, they cleared the forest, planted fruit orchards, vegetable gardens and grain fields and established twenty-nine communal villages as well as a brickworks (1909), sawmill and planer mill (1909), irrigation-works (1909), flourmill (1912), irrigation-works (1909), reservoir (1912), pumping station, central warehouse and store (1914), seed cleaning plant (1915), linseed oil press (1917), packinghouse and cannery (1920), shingle factory, apiary, canning factory (1935), blacksmith shop, granaries and barns. Following the demise of the CCUB in 1937-1938, the communal organization gradually declined. By 1961-1963, the lands were sold and the villages were disbanded.  Download

 

Brilliant, British Columbia, 1908-1938

In 1908, Community Doukhobors from Saskatchewan purchased 2,700 acres on the Kootenay River in the Castlegar district of British Columbia. Naming the area Brilliant, they cleared the forest, planted orchards and wheat fields and established six communal villages as well as a sawmill (1908), post office (1908), irrigation-works (1909), ferry (1910), railway station (1912), suspension bridge (1913), large jam factory (1915), packing house, central warehouse, retail store, grain elevator, flour mill, library, leader’s residence, apartment building for workers, community hall, apiary, electric generating plant, blacksmith shop, granaries and barns. It was the administrative and industrial centre of the CCUB. Today Brilliant is an unincorporated community.  Download

 

Ootischenia, British Columbia, 1908-1938

In 1908, Community Doukhobors from Saskatchewan purchased 2,700 acres along the Columbia River in the Castlegar district of British Columbia. Naming the area Ootischenia, they cleared the forest, planted fruit orchards, vegetable gardens and grain fields and established over twenty-two communal villages as well as a concrete reservoir, pumping plant, irrigation-works, steam plant, saw mill, planer mill, flour mill, linseed oil press, harness shop, blacksmith shop, granaries, barns, leader’s residence and community hall. Today Ootischenia is an unincorporated community.  Download

 

Champion Creek, British Columbia, 1912-1938

In 1912, Community Doukhobors from Saskatchewan purchased 920 acres at the confluence of Champion Creek and the Columbia River in the Castlegar district of British Columbia. Naming the area Blagodatnoe, they cleared the forest, planted fruit orchards, vegetable gardens and grain fields and established five unnamed communal villages as well as a saw mill, planer mill, blacksmith shop, granaries and barns. Following the demise of the CCUB in 1937-1938, the communal organization gradually declined. By 1961-1963, the lands were sold and the villages were disbanded.  Download

 

Glade, British Columbia, 1911-1938

In 1911, Community Doukhobors from Saskatchewan purchased 1,092 acres along the Kootenay River in the Glade district of British Columbia. Naming the area Plodorodnoe, they cleared the forest, planted fruit orchards, vegetable gardens and grain fields and established eleven communal villages as well as a ferry (1912), sawmill, planer mill, flourmill, linseed oil press, community hall and blacksmith shop. Following the demise of the CCUB in 1937-1938, the communal organization gradually declined. By 1961-1963, the lands were sold and the villages were disbanded.  Download

 

Shoreacres, British Columbia, 1912-1938

In 1912, Community Doukhobors purchased 500 acres on the Kootenay River in the Shoreacres district of British Columbia. Naming the area Prekrasnoe, they cleared the forest, planted fruit orchards, vegetable gardens, hay and grain fields and established three unnamed communal villages as well as an irrigation-works, blacksmith shop, granaries and barns. Following the demise of the CCUB in 1937-1938, the communal organization gradually declined. By 1961-1963, the lands were sold and the villages were disbanded.  Download

 

Pass Creek, British Columbia, 1909-1938

In 1909-1912, Community Doukhobors from Saskatchewan purchased 1,760 acres in the Pass Creek district of British Columbia. Naming the upper area Lugovoye and the lower area Kartoshnoye, they cleared the land, planted fruit orchards, vegetable gardens and hay fields and established six communal villages as well as a planer mill, two sawmills, irrigation works, dam, flour mill, blacksmith shop, granaries and barns. Following the demise of the CCUB in 1937-1938, the communal organization gradually declined. By 1961-1963, the lands were sold and the villages were disbanded.  Download

 

Winlaw, British Columbia, 1912-1938

In 1912-1915, Community Doukhobors from Saskatchewan purchased 837 acres along the Slocan River in the Winlaw district of British Columbia. There, they cleared the forest, planted fruit orchards and vegetable gardens and established four communal villages as well as a brickworks (1913), sawmill, blacksmith shop, granaries and barns. Following the demise of the CCUB in 1937-1938, the communal organization gradually declined. By 1961-1963, the lands were sold and the villages were disbanded.  Download

 


 

Alberta

 

Cowley-Lundbreck, Alberta, 1915-1938

In 1915-1917, Community Doukhobors from British Columbia purchased 13,500 acres in the Cowley and Lundbreck districts of Alberta. There, in the foothills of the Rockies, they planted grain fields, raised extensive livestock herds and established thirteen communal villages as well as a flourmill, elevators, central storehouse, prayer home, blacksmith shop, granaries and barns. Following the demise of the CCUB in 1937-1938, the lands were sold and the villages were dismantled.  Download

 

Arrowwood-Shouldice, Alberta, 1926-1945

After the death of Peter "Lordly" Verigin in 1924, his companion Anastasia F. Holuboff was recognized by several hundred Doukhobors as his successor. The majority of Community Doukhobors, however, proclaimed Verigin's son Peter "Chistiakov" Verigin as their leader. Disappointed, Anastasia and her followers broke away from the Community. In 1926, they established a communal colony in the Arrowwood-Shouldice district of Alberta. Following land shortages and crop failures, it was abandoned in 1945.  Download

 


 

United States

 

Doukhobor Settlement in Oregon, USA, 1913-1928

In the Teens and Twenties, two attempts were made to establish Doukhobor settlements in Oregon. In 1913, 23 Independent Doukhobor families from Saskatchewan purchased 1,000 acres of land and established a colony near Peoria in Linn County. It was short-lived, however, as the colonists were misled as to the quantity and quality of land, which turned out to be worthless for agriculture. Following protracted litigation, the land was foreclosed upon in 1917 and the colony abandoned. Then, in 1924, Community Doukhobors purchased 800 acres of land and established a colony near Eugene in Lane County, Oregon. Several families from British Columbia settled there, however, local anti-Doukhobor sentiment thwarted any large-scale settlement. In 1928, the colony was abandoned and the land sold.   Download

 


 

Back to Russia

 

Doukhobor Settlements in Rostov, Russia

In 1921-1923, 4,000 Doukhobors from the Caucasus were permitted to resettle on 25,000 acres in the Tselina district of Rostov province, Russia. There on the fertile steppes, they planted grain fields, raised extensive livestock herds and established twenty-one villages. The villages were settled in two lines known as the Petrovskoy Line and the Veriginsky Line. By 1933, the villages were collectivized. In the 1950’s, the villages were consolidated into eleven villages. By the 1960’s, the village collective farms were consolidated into two large collective farms, the 22nd Party Congress Collective Farm and the Lenin Collective Farm.  Download

 

Doukhobor Settlements in Zaporozhye, Ukraine

In 1923-1924, 500 Doukhobors from the Caucasus were permitted to resettle on 29,000 acres in the Mikhailovka district of Zaporozhye province, Ukraine. They were joined by forty Independent Doukhobor families from Canada. There on the fertile steppes, they planted grain fields, raised extensive livestock herds and established seven villages. By 1928, most of the Canadian Doukhobors had departed home. The remaining villages were devastated in the Second World War.  Download

 

Post-Soviet Doukhobor Migration to Russia

Following the breakup of the Soviet Union, several groups of Doukhobors from the Caucasus resettled in the Russian interior. Driven by regional instability, ethnic tensions, economic hardship and a longing for the Motherland, Doukhobors from Georgia and Azerbaijan resettled to Tula in 1989-1991, Stavropol, Krasnodar, Rostov and the Crimea from 1991-1998, Bryansk in 1998-1999 and Tambov in 2007.  Download

 

Doukhobor Settlements in Tula, Russia

In 1989-1991, 580 Doukhobors from Georgia were permitted to resettle on 12,850 acres in the Chern district of Tula province, Russia. There on the fertile steppes, they planted grain fields, orchards and market gardens and established three villages. They formed the Kolkhoz Lev Tolstoy ("Lev Tolstoy Collective Farm") on lands formerly belonging to the Tolstoy family.  Download

 

Doukhobor Settlements in Bryansk, Russia

In 1998-1999, ninety Doukhobor families from Georgia were permitted to resettle in the Kletnya district of Bryansk province, Russia. There on the fertile steppes, they planted grain fields, raised extensive livestock herds and established a village. They formed the Agricultural Production Cooperative of Community Doukhobors there.  Download

 

Doukhobor Settlements in Tambov, Russia

In 2007, one hundred and nine Doukhobors from Georgia were permitted to resettle in the Pervomayskiy district of Tambov province, Russia. There, they constructed a suburb in the village of Malyy Snezhetok and established market gardens, individual farmsteads and collective farms on the fertile steppes.  Download

 


 

Siberia and the Russian Far East

 

Doukhobor Exile and Settlement in Siberia, 1795-1865

In the late 1700’s and early to mid-1800’s, small groups of Doukhobors were exiled to the easternmost regions of Russia – Siberia and the Far East. The objective was to isolate the religious dissenters on the frontier where they would be unable to influence the general Orthodox population. Often the exiles journeyed thousands of miles by foot and barge to reach their place of exile. Few were allowed to return to their homes after their sentence was served. Consequently, a number of Doukhobor exile settlements were established there.  Download

 

Amur Doukhobor Settlements, 1859-1932

Between 1859-1895, hundreds of Doukhobors from Enisei, Tavria, Samara, Tambov and elsewhere, seeking religious liberty and the promise of free land, resettled along the Amur and Zeya river systems in the Blagoveshchensk district of Amur province, Russia. There, they established numerous villages and engaged in agriculture, trade and fishing. By 1909, there were over 2,000 Doukhobors living in the district. Following the establishment of Soviet authority, in 1926-1932, hundreds of Doukhobors were dispossessed, deported or liquidated as "class enemies".  Download

 

Doukhobor Exile to Yakutsk, Siberia, 1896-1900

Between 1896 and 1900, 125 Doukhobor army conscripts from the Caucasus were exiled to the Yakutsk region of Siberia for a term of 18 years for refusing to perform military service.  The exiles undertook the 12,800 kilometer journey in five parties over a five year period.  The journey was completed by railroad, by foot and by river barge and took ten months to complete.  Once in Yakutsk, the Doukhobor exiles established three settlements.  In 1905, their sentences were commuted and the Doukhobors were permitted to join their brethren in Canada.  Download