Doukhobor Genealogy Website  
 

Origin and Meaning of Molokan Surnames

 

by Jonathan J. Kalmakoff with Andrew J. Conovaloff

 

A study of the origin and meaning of Molokan surnames reveals many clues about our family history. In some cases they indicate the first name, trade or occupation, descriptive nickname, or ethnic or geographic origin of an early ancestor. This glossary contains roots and meanings of 702 Russian surnames occurring among the Molokans, together with the original Cyrillic spelling, transliterated English spelling, and English spelling variations. Note: to search for a particular surname, use the alphabetical index below or else use your browser's <find> function by pressing <Control F> and typing in the name.


A -

Abakumov
Абакумов.
This patronymic surname is derived from Abakum, a diminutive form of the men's name Avakum. lEnglish spelling variants include: Abakumoff. [Soundex Code A125]

Abramov
Абрамов.
This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Abram. lEnglish spelling variants include: Abramoff.  [Soundex Code A165]

Adamov
Адамов.
This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Adam. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code A351] 

Afanas'ev
Афанасьев.
This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Afanasy. lEnglish spelling variants include: Afanasiv, Afansev, Afanasev, Afanaseff, Afinsoff.  [Soundex Code A152]

Afonin
Афонин.
This patronymic surname is derived from Afonya, a diminutive form of the men's names Agafon, Afanasy and Afonii.  [Soundex Code A155]

Agapov
Агапов.
This surname is derived from the men's name Agapei or the women's name Agapa. lEnglish spelling variants include: Agapoff.  [Soundex Code A211] 

Aistov
Аистов. This surname originates from the term aist, meaning "stork". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of the bird, perhaps a tall-legged or long-nosed individual. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code A231]

Aksyonov
Аксёнов.
This patronymic surname is derived from Aksyon, a diminutive form of the men's name Aksentii. lEnglish spelling variants include: Aksenoff, Aksionov, Axionoff, Aksionoff.  [Soundex Code A251]

Alatyrtsev
Алатырцев.
This surname originates from the Old Russian term alatyrets, meaning "abusive", "confused" or "uncertain". This term was given as a nickname to someone who matched this description. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code A436]

Aldokushin
Алдокушин.
This patronymic surname is derived from Aldokusha, a diminutive form of the men's name Aldokim. lEnglish spelling variants include: Aldakushin, Aldacushion, Aldacushon.  [Soundex Code A432]

Aleksandrov
Алексадров.
This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Aleksander. lEnglish spelling variants include: Alexandroff, Alexandrov, Aleksandroff.  [Soundex Code A425]

Alekseev
Алексеев.
This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Aleksei. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code A421] 

Alennikov
Аленников.
This patronymic surname is derived from Alenik, a diminutive form of the men's name Aleksander. lEnglish spelling variants include: Alenikov.  [Soundex Code A452]

Alent'ev
Алентьев.
This patronymic surname is derived from Alentii, a diminutive form of the men's name Aletii. lEnglish spelling variants include: Alentieff, Alentoff.  [Soundex Code A453]

Alyoshin
Алёшин.
This patronymic surname is derived from Aliosha, a diminutive form of the men's name Aleksei. lEnglish spelling variants include: Alyoshin.  [Soundex Code A425]

Alkhutov
Алхутов.
This patronymic surname is derived from the Turkic men's name Alkhat. lEnglish spelling variants include: Alkhutoff, Alkhoutoff.  [Soundex Code A423]

Andreev
Андреев.
This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Andrei. lEnglish spelling variants include: Andreeff, Andreff, Androff, Androw, Andrews.  [Soundex Code A536]

Anfimov
Анфимов.
This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Anfim. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code A515] 

Anishko
Анишко.
This Ukrainian surname is derived from Anishka, a diminutive form of the men's names Onisim and Anisii and the women's names Anna and Anisia.  [Soundex Code A522]

Antipov
Антипов. T
his patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Antip. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code A531] 

Antonov
Антонов. T
his patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Anton. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code A535] 

Anufiev
Ануфриев. This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Anufrii. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code A511] 

Apashev
Апашев.
This patronymic surname is derived from Apash, a diminutive form of the men's name Ipaty.  Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code A121]

Aprashin
Апрашин.
This surname is derived from Aprasha, a diminutive form of the women's names Praskovia and Evpraksia.  It is also suggested that the name can derive from Abrasha, a diminutive form of the men's name Abram.  Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code A162]

Aref'ev
Арефьев. This patronymic surname is derived from Aref', a diminutive form of the men's name Arefey. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code A611] 

Arinin
Аринин.
This matronymic surname is derived from the women's name Arina. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code A655]

Arishin
Аришин.
This patronymic surname is derived from Arisha, a diminutive form of the men's name Arinei and the women's name Arina. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code A625]

Artishchev
Артищев. This surname originates from the dialect term rtishche, meaning "big mouth". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed this quality. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code A632]  

Arutyunyan
Арутюнян.
This Armenian surname is derived from the Armenian term harutiun, meaning "resurrection". lEnglish spelling variants include: Arataunian, Arutunian, Arutjunjan.  [Soundex Code A635]

Arzhanov
Аржанов.
This surname originates from the term rzhanoi, meaning "neighing". It is also suggested that the name can derive from the Mordvinian men's name Arzhai. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code A625]

Astakhov
Астахов. This patronymic surname is derived from Astakha, a diminutive form of the men's names Evstafii and Evstakhii.  Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code A232]

Avdeev
Авдеев. This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Avdei. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code A131] 

Avtaikin
Автайкин.
This surname originates from avtaika, a diminutive form of the Mordvinian term avtai, meaning "bear". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a bear, perhaps a great, awkward, hulking, powerful individual. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code A132]

B -

Babaev
Бабаев.
This surname derives from the Tatar term babai, meaning "grandfather". This should not be confused with the more familiar Russian term baba, meaning "grandmother" or "old woman". lEnglish spelling variants include: Babayeff, Babaeff, Bebieff, Bibaeff, Bibayoff, Bibieff, Bibioff, Bibyoff, Babaew, Bebaeff, Babayev.  [Soundex Code B110]

Babakov
Бабаков. This surname originates from the dialect term babak, meaning "marmot" (groundhog or woodchuk). Note that this term also referred to a sleepy, dense, solitary, small, clumsy or idle individual. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code B121]

Baev
Баев.
This surname originates from the dialect verb bait' meaning "to speak" or "to tell". Bai was the term given to a "chatterer" or "storey-teller". It is also suggested that the name can derive from the Turkic term bai, meaning "lord" or "noble". Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code B100]

Bakholdin
Бахолдин.
This surname originates from the dialect term bakholda, meaning "boaster", "idler" or "talker". lEnglish spelling variants include: Baholden, Bakholden, Baholdin.  [Soundex Code B243]

Balakhonov
Балахонов.
This surname originates from the term balakhon, a type of loose overalls worn by men in Old Russia. This term may have been given as a nickname to a maker or perhaps wearer of balakhon. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code B425]

Balikhin
Балихин. This surname originates from the dialect term balikhoi, a type of porridge or gruel popular in Old Russia. Food nicknames such as this were popular among the agrarian Russian peasantry. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code B425]

Bannikov
Банников.
This surname originates from the term bannik, the "attendant" or "user" of a bathhouse (banya). Bannik was also the name of the fairytale spirit said to inhabit that place. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code B521]

Baranov
Баранов. T
his surname originates from the term baran, meaning "ram". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a ram, perhaps a gentle, affectionate personality. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code B651]

Barsukov
Барсуков.
This surname originates from the term barsuk, meaning "badger" or in some dialects, "wild boar". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a badger or wild boar, perhaps a stubborn, wild or fierce individual. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code B622]

Baryshev
Барышев.
This surname originates from the Old Russian term barysh, meaning "profit". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who was rich and wealthy. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code B621]

Bashkin
Башкин.
This surname originates from the Tatar term bashka, meaning "head". Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code B225]

Basov
Басов. This
surname originates from the dialect term basyy, meaning "beautiful" or "visible".  It is also suggested that the name originated, among the Russian Orthodox clergy, from the Latin term basa (bass), to describe someone with a deep, bass singing voice.  Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code B210]

Batyaev
Батяев.
This surname originates from the Old Russian term batya, meaning "father". It is also suggested that the name can derive from the Mongol term bata, meaning "strong" or "steady". lEnglish spelling variants include: Bataeff, Bataiff, Bataoff, Batioff, Botieff, Batoeff, Batoev, Batuev, Batieff, Batueff.  [Soundex Code B310]

Bavin
Бавин.
This surname derives from the dialect term bava, meaning "sluggish", "slow" or "dilatory". lEnglish spelling variants include: Bivin, Biven, Bavin, Baven.  [Soundex Code B150]

Bazykin
Базыкин.
This surname originates from the dialect term bazyka, meaning "quarrelsome", "captious" or "talker". lEnglish spelling variants include: Bazikin, Bazigin.  [Soundex Code B225]

Belikov
Беликов.
This surname originates from belik, a diminutive form of the term belyi, meaning "white". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone with blond, grey or white hair, a fair complexion, or perhaps a clean or pure individual. lEnglish spelling variants include: Belikoff, Bellcove, Beliakoff.  [Soundex Code B421]

Belogorov
Белогоров.
This surname originates from the term belyi ("white") + gor ("mountain") and refers to someone who lived near a white mountain. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code B426]

Belousov
Белоусов.
This surname originates from the term belyi ("white") + us ("moustache") or "white-moustache". The resulting nickname belous (pronounced belowoos) was given to someone with a white, light or greyish moustache. lEnglish spelling variants include: Belousoff. [Soundex Code B421]

Belyaev
Беляев.
This surname originates from belyai, a diminutive form of the term belyi, meaning "white". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone with blond, grey or white hair, a fair complexion, or perhaps a clean or pure individual. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code B410]

Bezzubtsev
Беззубцев.
This surname originates from bezzubets, the term for someone without (bez) teeth (zubyi). This term was given as a nickname to someone who matched this description. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code B213]

Biryukov
Бирюков.
This surname originates from the term biryuk, meaning "wolf". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a wolf, perhaps a lone, solitary individual. lEnglish spelling variants include: Berekoff, Berikoff, Berukoff, Birukoff, Barikoff, Berokoff, Birokoff, Burikoff, Berekow, Berikow, Berukow, Birookoff, Birukow, Biryoukoff, Bierukoff, Birekoff, Biriukov, Biriukove, Berukove.  [Soundex Code B621]

Bizyaev
Бизяев.
This surname originates from the dialect term bizyai, meaning "short-sighted" or "weak-sighted". This term was given as a nickname to a someone who matched this description. lEnglish spelling variants include: Bizyaeff, Bizayiff, Bizieff, Bezayiff, Bizayieff.  [Soundex Code B210] 

Blokhin
Блохин.
This surname originates from the term blokha, meaning "flea". Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code B425]

Bobylyov
Бобылёв.
This surname originates from the term bobyl' meaning a "landless peasant". Note that this term also referred to a "solitary" or "lonely" man. lEnglish spelling variants include: Bobiloff.  [Soundex Code B141]

Bobyshev
Бобышев.
This surname derives from bobysh, a diminutive form of the term bob, meaning "bean". lEnglish spelling variants include: Bobysheff, Bobyshov, Bobishoff, Babashoff, Babeshoff, Babishoff, Babshaw, Babshoff, Babushoff, Babshow.   [Soundex Code B121]

Bocharnikov
Бочарников. Th
is surname originates from the dialect term bocharnik, meaning "cooper", a craftsman who manufactured wooden barrels, casks, etc. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code B265]

Bogdanov
Богданов.
This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Bogdan. The name Bogdan ("given by God") was frequently given to illegitimate children and foundlings in Old Russia. lEnglish spelling variants include: Bagdanof, Bagdanoff, Bogdanoff, Bagdanove, Bagdonoff, Bagdanov, Baghdanov, Bogdonoff, Bogdonov.  [Soundex Code B235]

Bogunov
Богунов. Thi
s surname originates from the dialect term bogun, meaning "ledum palustre" or "labrador tea", a type of plant with strongly aromatic leaves used in Old Russia to make herbal tea. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code B251]

Bokin
Бокин.
This surname originates from the term bok, meaning the "side" or "flank" of one's body or torso. This term may have been given as a nickname to a lopsided or broadsided person. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code B250]

Boldin
Болдин.
This surname originates from the dialect term boldoi, meaning "cudgel" or "sledge hammer". Note that this term also referred to a dense individual. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code B435]

Boldyrev
Болдырев.
This surname originates from boldyr, the term for a child of a mixed marraige, for example, the son of a Russian and Tatar. lEnglish spelling variants include: Bolderoff, Boldiroff, Boldareff, Boldroff, Bolder.  [Soundex Code B436]

Bolotin
Болотин.
This surname originates from the term boloto, meaning "swamp" or "marsh" and refers to someone who lived near such a place. lEnglish spelling variants include: Boloten, Balotin.  [Soundex Code B435]

Bondarev
Бондарев.
This surname originates from the Ukrainian term bondar, meaning "cooper", a craftsman who manufactured wooden barrels, casks, etc. The Ukrainian root of this name (compare the Russian term for cooper - bochkar) suggests that it is either a Ukrainianized Russian or else a Russianized Ukrainian surname. lEnglish spelling variants include: Bondareff, Bonderoff, Bondoreff, Bondaroff, Bondarow, Bondariff, Bonderove, Bonderov, Bonderow.  [Soundex Code B536]

Borisov
Борисов.
Borisov is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It is patronymic in origin and is derived from the men's name Boris. lEnglish spelling variants include: Barisoff, Berisoff, Borisoff.  [Soundex Code B621]

Borodin
Бородин.
This surname originates from the term boroda, meaning "beard". This term was given as a nickname to a man with a broad, bushy beard. lEnglish spelling variants include: Boridin, Barodin, Baradin, Baradine, Borodinoff.  [Soundex Code B635]

Bryukhin
Брюхин.
This surname originates from the dialect term bryukho, meaning "belly", "stomach" or "paunch". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone with a prominent belly or girth. lEnglish spelling variants include: Brukhin, Brukin. [Soundex Code B625]

Bubnov
Бубнов.
This surname originates from the term buben, meaning "tambourine". Note that this term also referred to an "impoverished", "idle" or "wasted" individual. lEnglish spelling variants include: Bubnow, Bubnoff. [Soundex Code B151]

Buchnev
Бучнев.
This surname originates from the term buchen' meaning "bull", "frog", "bumblebee" and "bittern" in various dialects. All of these animals make a sound perceived as bu-bu. lEnglish spelling variants include: Buchneff, Butchnew, Butchinoff, Butchnoff, Buchnoff, Bushneff.  [Soundex Code B251]

Budanov
Буданов.
This surname originates from the dialect term budan, a type of soup made with flour for thickening. Food nicknames such as this were popular among the agrarian Russian peasantry. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code B351]

Bugrov
Бугров.
This surname originates from the term bugor, meaning "hill", "hillock", "heap" or "mound" and may refer to someone who lived or worked near such a place. lEnglish spelling variants include: Bogroff, Boogroff, Boogrove, Boogrov.  [Soundex Code B261]

Bukharov
Бухаров.
This surname originates from the term bukhara, meaning "ground", "hay meadow", "poor", "tavern" and "fireplace" in various dialects. It is also suggested that the name indicates a family that originated from the Uzbek city of Bukhara. lEnglish spelling variants include: Bukroff, Buckroff, Bukaroff, Bucaroff, Bukrow.  [Soundex Code B261]

Bulgakov
Булгаков.
This surname originates from the Turkic term bulgak, meaning "troublesome". Note that this surname was borne by Feodor Bulgakov (aka David Evseevich) co-founder of the Pryguny branch of Molokans in Saratov province, Russia in the mid 19th century. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code B422]

Burenin
Буренин
. This surname derives from the term burenoi, meaning "brown". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone with brown hair colour. lEnglish spelling variants include: Brenin.  [Soundex Code B655]

Burov
Буров
. This surname derives from the term buryy, meaning "brown" or "bay". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone with reddish-brown hair colour. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code B610]

Burtsev
Бурцев. T
his surname originates from the dialect term burets, meaning "brown" or "bay". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone with reddish-brown hair colour.  Note this term also referred to an "ordinary-looking" person. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code B632]

Bychkov
Бычков.
This surname originates from the term bychok, meaning a "young ox" or "bullock". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone with a lively, frisky or headstrong disposition. lEnglish spelling variants include: Bichkoff, Bechkoff, Batchkoff.  [Soundex Code B221]

Bykanov
Быканов.
This surname originates from bykan, a diminutive form of the term byk ("bull") meaning "little bull". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone with a lively, frisky or headstrong disposition. lEnglish spelling variants include: Bekanoff.  [Soundex Code B251]

Ch -

Chekanov
Чеканов.
This surname originates from the term chekan, a fighting axe with a long handle. Note that this term also referred to a "punch", "die" or "stamp". This nickname may have been given to someone who manufactured or used this or tool. lEnglish spelling variants include: Chekanoff, Chekunoff, Chicanoff, Chickanoff, Chickenoff, Chikenoff, Chickinoff.  [Soundex Code C251]

Chekushkin
Чекушкин.
This surname originates from the dialect term chekushka, meaning "small hare" or "fieldmouse". Note that this term also referred to an irrepressible chatterer or liar. lEnglish spelling variants include: Checkushkin.  [Soundex Code C222]

Chepliev
Чеплиев. T
his surname originates from the dialect verb cheplyati, meaning "to attach", "to suspend", "to fasten" and "to hang". It is also suggested that the name can derive from the dialect term chapli, meaning "heron". Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code C141]

Cheremisin
Черемисин.
This surname refers to someone from the region or tribe of the Cheremisa, a Mordvinian people. lEnglish spelling variants include: Cherimisin, Czermisin.  [Soundex Code C652]

Cheremisov
Черемисов.
This surname refers to someone from the region or tribe of the Cheremisa, a Mordvinian people. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code C652]

Chernikov
Черников.
This surname originates from the term chernik, meaning "bilberry" or "whortleberry". Note that chernik is also a diminutive form of the term chernyi, meaning "black". lEnglish spelling variants include: Chernikoff, Chernakoff, Chernekoff, Cherney.  [Soundex Code C652]

Chernobaev
Чернобаев.
This surname originates from the term chernoi ("black") + the verb bait' ( "to speak"), meaning "one who speaks black". This nickname was given to someone who spoke obscenely or vulgarly. lEnglish spelling variants include: Chernabaeff, Chernobaeff, Chernobieff.  [Soundex Code C651]

Chernyaev
Черняев. Thi
s surname originates from chernyai, a variant form of the term chernyi, meaning "black". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone with a dark and swarthy complexion, black hair, dark clothes, or perhaps a dirty or foul-tempered individual. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code C651]

Chernyshev
Чернышов.
This surname originates from chernysh, a diminutive form of the term chernyi, meaning "black". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone with a dark and swarthy complexion, black hair, dark clothes, or perhaps a dirty or foul-tempered individual. lEnglish spelling variants include: Chernisheff, Chernishoff.  [Soundex Code C652]

Cherny
Черны. This Ukrainian surname originates from the term chernyi, meaning "black". This nickname may describe someone with a dark and swarthy complexion, black hair, dark clothes, or perhaps a dirty or foul-tempered individual. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code C650]

Cheshev
Чешев. This surname originates from the dialect term chesh, meaning "Czech" and indicates an ancestor who originated from the Czech lands. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code C210]

Chesnokov
Чесноков. This surname originates from the term chesnok, meaning "garlic". Food nicknames such as this were popular among the agrarian Russian peasantry. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code C252]

Chichov
Чичов.
This surname originates from the dialect term chich, meaning "hay" (growing on a marsh). lEnglish spelling variants include: Chichoff, Cheechoff, Cheechov.  [Soundex Code C210]

Chindin
Чиндни.
This patronymic surname is derived from Chind, a diminutive form of the Mordvin men's names Chindyapa, Chindyava or Chindyaika.  Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code C535]

Chugunov
Чугунов.
This surname originates from the term chugun, meaning "cast-iron" or "pig-iron". This term may have been given as a nickname to hard or brittle person or to an iron-worker who made cast-iron products. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code C251]

- D -

Dalmatov
Далматов.
This patronymic surname is derived from the Old Russian men's name Dalmatii. Note that this surname was borne by Semeon Dalmatov, co-founder of the Molokan movement in Saratov province, Russia in the late 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Dalmatoff, Dolmatoff, Dolmatov, Delmatoff.  [Soundex Code D453] 

Danilov
Данилов.
This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Danila. lEnglish spelling variants include: Daniloff.  [Soundex Code D541]

Dashkov
Дашков.
This surname, also written as Dashkin, is derived from Dashka, a diminutive form of the men's names Darii and Dasii and the women's names Daria, Dasia, Bogdana and Ada. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code D221]

Davydov
Давыдов.
Davydov is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It is patronymic in origin and is derived from the men's name Davyd. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code D131]

Deikov
Деиков.
This surname originates from the dialect verb deikati, meaning "to chatter", "to complain" or "to speak now and then". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed these traits. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code D210]

Deriabin
Дерябин.
This surname originates from the dialect term deriaboi, meaning "crybaby", "squabbler", " fighter" and "restless". lEnglish spelling variants include: Derabin, Driabin, Deryabin.  [Soundex Code D615]

Derkachov
Деркачов. This surname originates from the term derkach, meaning "crake". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of the bird, perhaps someone with jerky movements or someone with a voice like the cry of a crake. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code D622]

Desyatov
Десятов.
This surname originates from the term desyat' meaning "ten". This term may have been given as a nickname to the tenth child in a family. lEnglish spelling variants include: Desatoff, Desyatov.  [Soundex Code D231]

Dirin
Дирин.
This surname originates from the term dira, meaning "hole". Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code D650]

Dmitriev
Дмитриев.
This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Dmitry. lEnglish spelling variants include: Demetrieff, Demetroff, Demetriff.  [Soundex Code D536]

Dobrynin
Добрынин.
This patronymic surname is derived from the Old Russian men's name Dobrynya. lEnglish spelling variants include: Dobrenen, Dobrinen, Dobrinin, Dubrinin.  [Soundex Code D165]

Dolgopolov
Долгополов.
This surname is derived from the term dolgoi ("long") + pol ("skirt"). This nickname was frequently given to Orthodox clergy because of their robes with long skirts. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code D421]

Dolgov
Долгов.
This surname originates from the term dolgoi, meaning "long". It is also suggested that the name can derive from the term dolg, meaning "duty". lEnglish spelling variants include: Dolgoff, Dalgoff.  [Soundex Code D421]

Donetskov
Донецков.
This name is properly Donetsky. The -ov suffix ending was added subsequent to its formation. This surname indicates a family that originated from the Donets river in South Russia. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code D532]

Donskoy
Донской.
This surname indicates a family that originated from the Don river in South Russia. lEnglish spelling variants include: Donskoi, Donskoj, Donske.  [Soundex Code D520]

Dorofeev
Дорофеев.
This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Dorofei. lEnglish spelling variants include: Drafeiv.  [Soundex Code D611]

Drachev
Драчев. This s
urname originates from the term drach, meaning "fighter" or "scrapper".  Note that this term also means "teal" (small bird) in some dialects. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed these traits. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code D621]

Drobyshev
Дробышев.
This surname originates from the dialect term drobysh, meaning someone who takes small, fractional steps. lEnglish spelling variants include: Drabshoff, Drobshoff. [Soundex Code D612]

Drozdov
Дроздов.
This surname originates from the term drozd, meaning "blackbird" or "thrush". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a blackbird, perhaps a swift, cheerful or singing individual. lEnglish spelling variants include: Drozdoff, Drazdoff, Drozdow, Drazdow, Drozdove, Drazdove.  [Soundex Code D623]

Druginin
Другинин.
This surname originates from the term druginya, meaning a (female) "friend". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed this quality or matched this description.  [Soundex Code P625] 

Druzhinin
Др
ужинин. This surname originates from the term druzhina, meaning "comrades", "friends", "team" or "group". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who belonged to a group of friends.  [Soundex Code P625] 

Dudin
Дудин.
This surname originates from the term duda, meaning "pipe" or "horn". This term may have been given as a nickname to a peasant musician who played the horn, a horn-maker or perhaps a loud individual. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code D350]

Dunaev
Дунаев.
This surname indicates a family that originated from the river Dunai (Danube). Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code D510]

Durakov
Дураков.
This surname originates from the term durak, meaning "fool", "idiot" or "simpleton". lEnglish spelling variants include: Durakoff, Dorskoff.  [Soundex Code D621]

Dutov
Дутов.
This surname originates from the term dutii, meaning "haughty", "inflated" or "boastful". lEnglish spelling variants include: Dutoff, Dootoff, Doutoff, Dotoff, Dutow, Dutove.  [Soundex Code D310]

Dvornin
Дворнин.
This surname originates from the dialect term dvornyi, meaning "domestic", "servant" or "menial", one that performs duties about the person or home of a master or employer. lEnglish spelling variants include: Dvorinin.  [Soundex Code D165]

D'yakonov
Дьяконов.
This surname originates from the term d'yakon, meaning "deacon", an ecclesiastical official who assisted in Russian Orthodox church services, read psalms, assisted the priest, etc. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code D251]

E -

Efremov
Ефремов.
Efremov is derived from the men's name Efrem (pronounced Yefrem). Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code E165]

Egorov
Егоров.
This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Egor (pronounced Yegor). lEnglish spelling variants include: Egoroff, Egorow, Egroff, Egeroff, Yegorov, Yegoroff, Ehoroff, Yehoroff.  [Soundex Code E261]

Ekimov
Екимов. This
patronymic surname is derived from Ekim, a variant form of the men's name Akim. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code E251]

El'fimov
Ельфимов.
This patronymic surname is derived from Elfim, a diminutive form of the men's name Evfimii. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code E415]

Erkin
Еркин.
This patronymic surname is derived from Erka (pronounced Yerka) a diminutive form of the men's names Erofei (pronounced Yerofei) and Erast (pronounced Yerast). Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code E6252]

Ermakov
Ермаков.
This patronymic surname is derived from Ermak (pronounced Yermak) a diminutive form of the men's name Ermolai (pronounced Yermolai). lEnglish spelling variants include: Ermakoff, Ermacoff, Yermakoff.  [Soundex Code E652]

Ermolov
Ермолов. Thi
s patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Ermolai (pronounced Yermolai). Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code E654]

Eropkin
Еропкин.
This patronymic surname is derived from Eropka (pronounced Yeropka) a diminutive form of the men's name Erofei (pronounced Yerofei). lEnglish spelling variants include: Eropken.  [Soundex Code E612]

Eseev
Е
сеев. This patronymic surname is derived from Esei, a diminutive form of the men's name Evsevei. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code E210]

Estagin
Есtагин.
This patronymic surname is derived from Estaga, a diminutive form of the men's name Evstafii. lEnglish spelling variants include: Estagen.  [Soundex Code E232]

Evdokimov
Евдокимов.
This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Evdokim (pronounced Yevdokim). lEnglish spelling variants include: Evdokimoff, Evdakimoff, Evdokimow, Evdokimiff, Evdekimoff, Yevdokimov, Yevdokimoff.  [Soundex Code E132]

Evseev
Евсеев.
This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Evsei (pronounced Yevsei). lEnglish spelling variants include: Evseaff, Evseff, Efseaff, Evseeff.  [Soundex Code E121]

Evstigneev
Евстигнеев. Thi
s patronymic surname is derived from the Old Russian men's name Evstignei. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code E123]

F -

Fadeev
Фадеев.
This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Fadei. lEnglish spelling variants include: Fadeeff, Fadeff, Fadieff, Fadaiow, Fadayow.  [Soundex Code F310]

Fedchenko
Федченко.
This Ukrainian surname is derived from Fedka, a diminutive form of the men's name Feodor.  [Soundex Code F325]

Fedorenko
Федоренко.
This Ukrainian surname is derived from the men's name Feodor.  [Soundex Code F365]

Fedorov
Федоров.
This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Feodor. lEnglish spelling variants include: Federoff, Fedoroff.  [Soundex Code F361]

Fedos'ev
Федосьев.
This patronymic surname is derived from Fedosii, a diminutive form of the men's name Fedosei. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code F321]

Fedotov
Федотов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Fedot. lEnglish spelling variants include: Fedotoff.  [Soundex Code F331]

Feshin
Фешин.
This patronymic surname is derived from Fesha, a diminutive form of several men's names including Feogen, Feodosii and Feoktist. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code F250]

Fes'kin
Феськин. This surname is derived from Fes'ka, a diminutive form of the men's names Feodosii and Fespesii and the women's names Fessalonika and Fessalonikiya. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code F250]

Fetisov
Фетисов.
This patronymic surname is derived from Fetis, a diminutive form of the Old Russian men's name Feoktist. lEnglish spelling variants include: Fetesoff, Fettisoff, Fetizow, Fettis.  [Soundex Code F321]

Filatov
Филатов.
This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Filat. lEnglish spelling variants include: Filatoff.  [Soundex Code F431]

Filimonov
Филимонов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Filimon. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code F455] 

Filippov
Филиппов.
Filippov is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It is patronymic in origin and is derived from the men's name Filipp. lEnglish spelling variants include: Filipoff, Fillipoff, Phillipoff, Philipoff, Filapoff, Filipow.  [Soundex Code F411]

Fisunov
Фисунов.
This patronymic surname is derived from Fisun, a diminutive form of the Old Russian men's names Afisa, Felitsata and Fista. lEnglish spelling variants include: Fesunoff.  [Soundex Code F251]

Fomichev
Фомичев. This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Foma and means "son of Foma". Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code F521]

Fomin
Фоминов.
This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Foma. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code F550]

Frolov
Фролов.
This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Frol. lEnglish spelling variants include: Froloff, Frolove. [Soundex Code F641]

G/H -

Galkin
Галкин.
This surname originates from the term galka, meaning "jackdaw". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of the bird, perhaps a harsh-voiced or black-haired individual. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code G425]

Galochekov
Галочеков.
This matronymic surname is derived from Galochek, a diminutive form of the women's name Galina. lEnglish spelling variants include: Guluchikoff.  [Soundex Code G422]

Gal'tsev
Гальцев.
This patronymic surname is derived from Gal'ets, a diminutive form of the men's name Galaktion and the women's name Galina. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code G432]

Galyaev
Галяев.
This patronymic surname is derived from Galya, a diminutive form of the men's name Galaktion.  Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code G410]

Georgiev
Георгиев.
This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Georgii. lEnglish spelling variants include: Georgeoff.  [Soundex Code G621]

Glazastov
Глазастов.
This surname originates from the dialect term glazasti, meaning "sharp-eyed". lEnglish spelling variants include: Glezasoff.  [Soundex Code G422]

Glazov
Глазов.
This surname originates from the term glaz, meaning "eye". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone with striking or prominent eyes. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code G421]

Gogolevsky
Гоголевскйй.
This surname indicates a family that originated from a village named Gogolevo, Gogolevka or Gogolevskoy, so called from the term gogol, meaning "golden-eye duck". lEnglish spelling variants include: Gouglavaysky.  [Soundex Code G241]

Golitsin
Голыцин.
This surname originates from the term golitsa, meaning "mitten". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who wore mittens or who made mittens. lEnglish spelling variants include: Galitsin, Golitzin, Galitzen, Galitzen.  [Soundex Code G432]

Goloshchapov
Голощапов. Th
is surname originates from the dialect term goloshchap, meaning a "boastful pauper", the dandy who has nothing to show off. This term may have been given as a derisive nickname to someone who matched this description. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code G422] 

Golovachev
Головачев.
This surname originates from the term golovach, meaning "big" or "large" "head" (golova). This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who matched this physical description.  Note that this term also referred to a "bullhead" fish. lEnglish spelling variants include: Holovachev, Holovachoff, Hallivichoff, Holwachoff, Hall.  [Soundex Code G412]

Golovastikov
Головастиков.
This surname originates from the term golovastik, meaning "tadpole". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a tadpole. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code G412]

Golubov
Голубов.
This surname originates from the term golub, meaning "pigeon" or "dove". This term may have been given as a nickname to a keeper of doves, an amourous person, or someone mild and gentle as a dove. lEnglish spelling variants include: Goluboff, Goloboff, Golobif, Golobeff, Golubev, Globoff, Golubove, Golobiff, Golubef, Golubiff.  [Soundex Code G411]

Golubyatkin
Голубяткин. This sur
name originates from the dialect term golubyatka, meaning "pigeon" or "dove". Note this term also referred to a "maiden".  Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code G413]

Golyaev
Голяев. This surname may originate from the term golyi, meaning "naked" or "destitute". It is also suggested that the name can derive from the verb gulyat' meaning "to walk" or "to stroll". Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code G410]

Goncharenko
Гончаренко.
This Ukrainian surname is derived from the term gonchar, meaning "potter", a craftsman or artisan who made and sold pots, dishes, and other earthenware vessels out of clay.   [Soundex Code G526]

Gorbachev
Горбачев.
This surname originates from the term gorbach, meaning "hunchback". This term was given as a nickname to someone who matched this description. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code G612]

Gorbenko
Горбенко.
This Ukrainian surname is derived from the term gorb, meaning "hump" or "hunchback". This term was given as a nickname to someone who matched this description.  [Soundex Code G615] 

Gorbulov
Горбулов.
This surname originates from the term gorbulya, meaning a female "hunchback". This term was given as a nickname to a woman who matched this description. lEnglish spelling variants include: Gorbuloff.  [Soundex Code G614]

Gorchakov
Горчаков.
This surname originates from the dialect term gorchak, meaning "persicaria" or "peachwort", a type of plant with a bitter root. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the Turkic term gorchak meaning "statue", "doll" or a "very tall person". Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code G622]

Gorokhov
Горохов.
This surname originates from the term gorokh, meaning "peas". Botanical nicknames such as this were popular among the agrarian Russian peasantry. The Gorokhovs among the Molokans resided in Elizavetpol province, Russia prior to emigrating to America. lEnglish spelling variants include: Gorohoff.  [Soundex Code G621]

Goryanov
Горяинов. This surname originates from the term goryanin, meaning "mountaineer" and indicates a mountain inhabitant. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code G651]

Grachev
Грачев.
This surname originates from the term grach, meaning "rook". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of this bird, perhaps a noisy, harsh-voiced or black-haired individual. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code G621]

Granchikov
Гранчиков. Th
is surname is derived from the men's name Granchik, a diminutive form of the Old Russian men's name Gran. lEnglish spelling variants include: Granchukoff.  [Soundex Code G652]

Grankin
Гранкин. This patronymic surname is derived from Granka, a diminutive form of the Old Russian men's name Gran. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the Latin term granum, meaning "grain". Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code G652]

Grebenkin
Гребенкин.
This surname originates from the term grebenka, meaning "crest" or "comb". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who used or manufactured this household item. lEnglish spelling variants include: Gribenkin, Gribionkin.  [Soundex Code G615]

Grekov
Греков.
This surname originates from the term grek, meaning "Greek" and indicates a family that originated from Greece. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code G621]

Gridnev
Гриднев. This surname originates from the Old Russian term griden, the "soldier", "guardsman" or "princely bodyguard" in Old Russia.   It is also suggested that the name can derive from the Old Russian term gridnei, meaning "prince quarters" in a palace. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code G635]

Grigor'ev
Григорьев.
This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Grigory. lEnglish spelling variants include: Gregorieff, Gregoroff, Grigorieff, Grigorov.  [Soundex Code G626]

Grigorok
Григорок.
This Ukrainian surname is derived from Grigorok, a diminutive form of the men's name Grigory. lEnglish spelling variants include: Gregarok.  [Soundex Code G626]

Gritsik
Грицик. T
his Ukrainian surname is derived from Gritsa, a diminutive form of the men's name Grigory. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code G632]

Grudzien
Грудзиен.
This Polish surname originates from the Polish term grudzien, meaning "December". This term may have been given as a nickname to a child born in the last month of the year.  [Soundex Code G632]

Grushenkov
Грушенков.
This patronymic surname is derived from Grushenka, a diminutive form of the women's name Agrafena. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code G625]

Grymzin
Грумзин.
This surname originates from the term grymza, a type of red grape. Botanical nicknames such as this were popular among the agrarian Russian peasantry. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code G652]

Gudimov
Гудимов.
This patronymic surname is derived from Gudim, a diminutive form of the Old Russian men's name Gudimir. lEnglish spelling variants include: Gudimoff, Gudimow, Goudimoff, Goudima.  [Soundex Code G351]

Gudnin
Гуднин.
This surname originates from the term gudenie, meaning "buzzing", "droning", "humming" or "honking". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who made this noise.  Among the Molokans this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code G355]

Gunin
Гунин
. This surname is derived from Gunya, a diminutive form of the men's names Georgii, Egor and Sergei and the women's name Agrippina. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code G550]

Gurov
Гуров.
This patronymic surname is derived from Gura, a diminutive form of the men's name Gurii. lEnglish spelling variants include: Guroff, Gureff.  [Soundex Code G610]

Gusev
Гусев.
This surname originates from the term gus, meaning "goose". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a goose. lEnglish spelling variants include: Gusiff, Goosseff, Goosieff, Goosev, Gooseff, Ghosoph, Gosev, Goussev.  [Soundex Code G210]

Gvozdev
Гвоздев.
This surname originates from the term gvozd' meaning "nail" or "peg". This term may have been given as a nickname to a tall, thin person or perhaps someone with a strong, firm character. lEnglish spelling variants include: Gvozdeff, Gvozdiff, Gozdiff, Gozdieff, Gozdeff, Niles.  [Soundex Code G123]

I -

Ignatov
Игнатов.
Ignatov is derived from the men's name Ignaty. lEnglish spelling variants include: Egnatoff. [Soundex Code I253]

Igumnov
Игумнов. This surname originates from the term igumna, meaning "abbot", the superior of an Orthodox monastery for men. As an abbot had no right to marry and have children, this name must have been borne by peasants belonging to a monastery, or perhaps given to child by religiously devout parents. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code I251]

Il'in
Ильин.
This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Ilya. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code I450]

Inyukin
Инюкин. Th
is patronymic surname is derived from Inyuka, a diminutive form of the men's name Inokentii. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code I525]

Isaev
Исаев. This Ukrainian surname is derived from the men's name Isaiya.  Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code I210]

Isakov
Исаков.
This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Isak. lEnglish spelling variants include: Esakoff, Eskoff, Issakoff, Isakoff.  [Soundex Code I221]

Ivanikov
Иваников.
This patronymic surname is derived from Ivanik, a diminutive form of the men's name Ivan. lEnglish spelling variants include: Evanikoff.  [Soundex Code I152]

Ivanov
Иванов.
Ivanov is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It is derived from the men's name Ivan. lEnglish spelling variants include: Ivanoff, Evanoff. [Soundex Code I151]

Ivliev
Ивлиев. Ivliev is derived from Ivlii, a diminutive form of the men's name Iolii. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code I141]

K -

Kadatsky
Када
цкий. This surname indicates an ancestor who originated from a village named Kadat, Kadatskaya or perhaps Kadetsk, the etymological root of which is uncertain. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code K332]

Kalashnikov
Калашников.
This surname originates from the term kalashnik, meaning a "baker" of kalach (bread loaves). Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K425]

Kalimanov
Калиманов.
This patronymic surname is derived from the Turkic men's name Kaliman. lEnglish spelling variants include: Kalimanoff, Kalimanow, Kalimanav.  [Soundex Code K455]

Kalinin
Калинин.
This surname is derived from the men's name Kalina. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code K455]

Kalmykov
Калмыков.
This surname refers to someone from the region or tribe of the Kalmyks, a Mongol people who derived their name from the Turkic word kalmyk meaning "to remain". It may also refer to a non-Kalmyk Russian with facial features like those of a Kalmyk. lEnglish spelling variants include: Kalmakov, Kalmikov, Kolmakov, Kolmykov, Kalmokov, Kalmakoff, Kalmokoff, Kalmikoff, Kalmeikoff, Kolmokoff, Kalmykoff, Kolmakoff, Kolmakof, Kalmykow, Kalmakow, Kolmekow, Kolmikow, Kolmakow, Kalmikove, Kalmakove.  [Soundex Code K452]

Kambarov
Камбаров. This surname is derived from the Mongol-Turkic men's name Kambar.  It is also suggested that the name can derive from the Persian term kambar, meaning "brown". Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K516]

Kanygin
Каныгин.
This patronymic surname is derived from Konyga, a diminutive form of the men's name Konon. lEnglish spelling variants include: Kanigan, Kanegin, Kanigin, Kanegan, Konigan, Konigin, Konygin, Kanigen, Canihan, Kanigan, Kanehan, Kanechan, Kanihan, Kanechen.  [Soundex Code K525]

Kapranov
Капранов. This patronymic surname is derived from the Old Russian men's name Kapron. Note that this term also referred to a "man" or "muzhik" (peasant). Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K165] 

Kaptsov
Капцов.
This surname originates from the dialect term kopets, a species of falcon. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a falcon, perhaps a fierce, swift or keen-sighted individual. lEnglish spelling variants include: Kaptsoff, Kapsov, Kapsoff, Kapssof, Kapssoff.  [Soundex Code K132]

Karabanov
Карабанов.
This surname is derived from the dialect term karaban, meaning "jarring" or "shocking". Note that this term also referred to a "loaf of bread".  It is also suggested that the name can derive from the dialect term karabin, meaning "carbine" (rifle). Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K615]

Karaev
Караев.
This surname originates from the Turkic term kara, meaning "black" or "dark". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone with a dark and swarthy complexion, black hair, dark clothes, or perhaps a dirty or foul-tempered individual.  Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K610]

Karetov
Каретов.
This surname is derived from the term kareta, meaning a (horse-drawn) "carriage" or "coach". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who drove or manufactured a carriage. lEnglish spelling variants include: Karetoff, Karitoff, Koretoff.  [Soundex Code K631]

Karev
Карев.
This surname originates from the term karii, meaning "brown" or "hazel" eye colouring. Note that this term was also used in some Russian dialects to refer to someone with a brown and swarthy complexion. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K610]

Karnaukhov
Карнаухов.
This surname originates from the term karnaukhov, meaning "cut ear" or "mutilated ear". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who matched this physical description.  lEnglish spelling variants include: Karnouhoff.  [Soundex Code K652]

Karpin
Карпин.
This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Karp. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the term karp, meaning "carp" fish.  [Soundex Code K615] 

Karpov
Карпов.
This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Karp. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the term karp, meaning "carp" fish. lEnglish spelling variants include: Carpoff.  [Soundex Code K611]

Karyakin
Карякин.
This surname originates from the dialect term kariaka, meaning "persistent" or "obstinate". Note that this term also referred to a "poseur". lEnglish spelling variants include: Karyakin, Koriakin, Koryakin, Kriakin, Karyaken, Kariaken, Emerald.  [Soundex Code K625]

Kashcheev
Кащеев.
This surname originates from the dialect term kashchei, meaning the "fantastic" or "immortal" person. Note that this term also referred to a "greedy" or "rich" person. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K221]

Kashirsky
Каширский.
This surname indicates a family that originated from the Russian city of Kashira, so called from the term kashira, meaning "cattle shelter". lEnglish spelling variants include: Kashirski, Kashirskii, Kashirskiy, Kashirskij, Kachirski, Kachkirisky, Kachirsky, Kashersky, Kushurski.  [Soundex Code K262] 

Kasparov
Каспаров.
This patronymic surname is derived from the White Russian men's name Kaspar. lEnglish spelling variants include: Kasparoff.  [Soundex Code K216]

Kastryulin
Кастрюлин.
This surname originates from the term kastryulya, meaning "saucepan", a copper or iron vessel with steep sides used for cooking. his term may have been given as a nickname to someone who made or perhaps used saucepans for cooking. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code K236]

Kasymov
Касымов.
This patronymic surname is derived from the Turkic men's name Kasym. lEnglish spelling variants include: Kasimov, Kasimoff.  [Soundex Code K251]

Kasymsky
Касымский. Th
is surname indicates an ancestor who originated from a village named Kasimov, Kasimovo or Kasimovka, so called from the Turkic men's name Kasym. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code K252]

Katasonov
Катасонов.
This surname indicates a family that originated from the North Caucasian town of Katason. lEnglish spelling variants include: Katasonoff, Katasanoff.  [Soundex Code K325]

Katkov
Катков.
This surname originates from the term katok, meaning "roller" or "rolling-pin". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who used or made this household item. lEnglish spelling variants include: Katkoff, Kotkoff.  [Soundex Code K321]

Kazakov
Казаков.
This surname originates from kazak, meaning "Cossack". The Cossacks descend from runaway Russian and Ukrainian serfs and independent Tatar groups who established free self-governing communities on the southern steppes in the 15th century. Renowned horsemen, adventurers, frontiersmen, warriors, rebels, freebooters and bandits, the Cossacks established their own independent cultural tradition and were granted special freedoms and privileges by Russian, Polish and Turkish rulers in return for military service. lEnglish spelling variants include: Kazakoff, Kasakoff.  [Soundex Code K221]

Kazeev
Казеев. This surname originates from the Turkic term kazyy, meaning a "judge", someone who passed judgement in a court of law. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K210]

Khamzaev
Хамзаев.
This surname originates from the Turkic men's name Khamza. lEnglish spelling variants include: Khamzaeff, Hamzaeff.  [Soundex Code K521]

Kharitonov
Харитонов.
This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Khariton. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K635]

Khaustov
Хаустов. This surname originates from the Old Russian term fausty (borrowed from the Latin faustus, meaning "happy") and referred to a "simple peasant" in Old Russia. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K231]

Khirov
Хиров.
This surname originates from the dialect term khira, meaning "illness", "bad weather" or "slush". Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K610]

Khiteev
Хитеев.
This surname originates from the dialect term khitya, meaning “misfortune”, “disaster”, or “trouble”. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K310]

Khlystov
Хлыстов.
This surname originates from the term khlyst, meaning "whip". Note that this term also refers to a member of the Khlysty, a religious sect that practiced self-flagellation. lEnglish spelling variants include: Khlistoff, Klystoff, Klistoff, Chylstaff, Chylstoff, Cleyssoff, Chlitows, Klestoff, Histov.  [Soundex Code K423]

Khmyrev
Хмырев.
This surname originates from the dialect term khmyra, meaning "crybaby". It is also suggested that the name can derive from the verb khmyrit' meaning "to miss", "to grieve" and "to pout". Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code B250]

Khnykin
Хныкин. This surname originates from the dialect term khnykat' meaning "to complain" or "to sulk". Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K525]

Kholodinin
Холодинин. This surname originates from the term kholodnii, meaning "cold". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone whose demeanor was gloomy or cold, or perhaps to a child whose birth was marked by such natural phenomenon. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K435]

Kholopov
Холопов.
This surname originates from the term kholop, meaning "serf" or "slave". Beginning in the 16th century, laws were passed in Old Russia inhibiting the free movement of the peasant tenants of feudal lords. By the 18th century, serf peasants were bound to the landowner rather than to the land, reducing their condition to virtual slavery. There were also real slaves in Old Russia. Serfdom was abolished in 1861. lEnglish spelling variants include: Halopoff, Holopoff, Chalopow.  [Soundex Code K411]

Khomutov
Хомутов.
This surname originates from the term khomut, meaning "collar", "harness" or "yoke". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who used or manufactured such equipment. lEnglish spelling variants include: Homutoff, Homatoff, Homotoff.  [Soundex Code K531]

Khoprov
Хопров.
This surname originates from the term khoper, meaning "pile-driver". It is also suggested that the name indicates a family that originated from the Khoper river in South Russia. lEnglish spelling variants include: Haproff, Hoproff, Haprov.  [Soundex Code K161]

Khozin
Хозин.
This surname originates from the term khozya, meaning "owner", "master", "chief", "host" or "proprietor". lEnglish spelling variants include: Hozin, Hozen, Hazen.  [Soundex Code K250]

Khrapov
Храпов. Thi
s surname originates from the dialect term khrap, meaning "impudent" or "violent". It is also suggested that the name can derive from the dialect verb khrapet' meaning "to snore" or "to become presumptious". Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K611]

Khvorostov
Хворостов.
This surname originates from the term khvorost, meaning "brushwood", "underwood" or "windfall". It is also suggested that the name can derive from the term khvorost' meaning "sickliness". Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K162]

Kirilov
Кирилов. Kirilov is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It is patronymic in origin and is derived from the men's name Kirill. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K641]

Kiselev
Киселев.
This surname originates from the term kisel', a type of sour drink popular in Old Russia. Food nicknames such as this were popular among the agrarian Russian peasantry. lEnglish spelling variants include: Keseloff, Kiseloff, Kisseloff, Kessloff, Kissel.  [Soundex Code K241]

Kislenkov
Кисленков. Kislenkov is a Russianization of the Ukrainian surname Kislenko. The -v suffix ending was added after its formation. It originates from the term kislii, meaning "sour", "acid" or "tart". Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K245]

Kishko
Кишко.
This Ukrainian surname originates from the term kishka, meaning "gut" or "intestine". Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K220]

Kistanov
Кистанов.
This surname originates from the term kisten', meaning "bludgeon", "club" or "cudgel". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who used or manufactured this weapon. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K235]

Klenin
Кленин. This surname is derived from klen, meaning "maple tree" and may refer to someone who lived near a maple tree. It also suggested that the name can derive from Klenya, a diminutive form of the Old Russian men's name Kleonik.  Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K455]

Klubnikin
Клубникин.
This surname originates from the term klubnika, meaning "strawberry". Botanical nicknames such as this were popular among the agrarian Russian peasantry. lEnglish spelling variants include: Klubnickin, Klubnicken, Klubniken, Klubnik.  [Soundex Code K415]

Knyshin
Кнышин. This surname originates from the dialect term knysh, a type of baked bun or pancake with butter made in South Russia. Food nicknames such as this were popular among the agrarian Russian peasantry. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code K525]

Kobets
Кобец.
This surname derives from the term kobets, meaning "sparrow-hawk". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a hawk, perhaps a swift, rapacious or sharp-sighted individual.  [Soundex Code K132] 

Kobylov
Кобылов. This surname originates from the term kobyla, meaning "mare", a female horse. Animal nicknames such as this were popular among the agrarian Russian peasantry. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K141]

Kobzev
Кобзев.
This surname originates from the term kobza, a type of round string instrument played in Old Russia. This term may have been given as a nickname to a peasant musician who played or manufactured the kobza. lEnglish spelling variants include: Kobsef, Kobseff, Kobzeff, Kobzoff, Kobziff.  [Soundex Code K121]

Kochergin
Кочергин.
This surname originates from the term kocherga, meaning "poker" or "fire-iron". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who used or manufactured this household item. lEnglish spelling variants include: Kochergen, Kashergen, Kachergin.  [Soundex Code K262]

Kolesnikov
Колесников.
This surname originates from the term kolesnik, meaning "wheelwright", a craftsman who made and repaired wooden wheels and wheeled vehicles such as carts, wagons, carraiges, etc. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K425]

Kolodin
Колодин.
This surname derives from the term koloda, meaning "block" or "log". Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K435]

Koloskov
Колосkов.
This originates from koloska, a diminutive form of the term kolos, meaning "ear" (of corn, wheat, etc). Botanical nicknames such as this were popular among the agrarian Russian peasantry. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code K421]

Kolpakov
Колпаков.
This surname originates from the term kolpak, meaning "cap". Note that this term also referred to a "sleepy fellow". lEnglish spelling variants include: Kalpakoff, Kolpakoff, Kalp.  [Soundex Code K412]

Komyagin
Комягин.
This surname originates from the dialect term komyaga, meaning a type of "log boat". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who made or used such a vessel. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code K525]

Konchakov
Кончаков.
This patronymic surname is derived from the Turkic men's name Konchak. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code K522]

Kondakov
Кондаков.
This patronymic surname is derived from Kondak, a diminutive form of the men's name Kondratii. lEnglish spelling variants include: Kondakoff, Kondikoff, Kundikoff.  [Soundex Code K532]

Kondaurov
Кондауров.
This surname originates from the dialect term kondyr' meaning a "high collar", "cuff" or "peak". Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K536]

Kondrashev
Кондрашев.
This patronymic surname is derived from Kondrasha, a diminutive form of the men's name Kondratii. The Kondrashovs among the Molokans resided in the Amur region of Russia prior to emigrating to America. lEnglish spelling variants include: Kondrashoff, Condrashoff.  [Soundex Code K536]

Konev
Конев.
This surname originates from the term kon' meaning "horse". It is also suggested that the name can derive from Konya, a diminutive form of several men's names including Konon, Nikon and Kondratii. lEnglish spelling variants include: Konnoff, Konoff.  [Soundex Code K510]

Konovalov
Коновалов.
This surname originates from the term konoval, meaning "horse doctor" - someone whose trade involved the care and treatment of horses for disease and injuries, birthing and gelding. lEnglish spelling variants include: Konovaloff, Kanavalov, Kanavaloff, Kanovalov, Conovaloff, Konoloff. [Soundex Code K514]

Konstantinov
Константинов. This
patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Konstantin. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K523]

Kopchenko
Копченко.
This Ukrainian surname is derived from Kopka, a diminutive form of the men's name Kapiton. lEnglish spelling variants include: Kopchenka.  [Soundex Code K125]

Kopylov
Копылов. Thi
s surname originates from the dialect term kopyl' meaning "post", "strut", "staff", "distaff" or "column". Note that this term also refers to an "obstinate", "proud" or "uncompromising" person. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K141]

Korolev
Королев.
This surname originates from the term korol, meaning "king". It is unlikely that the bearers of this surname actually descend from kings since there were never any kings in Russia, only tsars. The term "king" was known to Russians mainly from fairytales and playing cards. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who was rich, worldly, happy or imperious, or it may have been given to a child, by superstitious parents, as a sign of good luck. lEnglish spelling variants include: Koraloff.  [Soundex Code K641]

Kornev
Корнев.
This surname originates from the term koren' meaning "root". Note that this term also refers to an "obstinate", "severe" or "avaricious" person. It is also suggested that the name can derive from derived from Kornei, a diminutive form of the men's name Kornilii. lEnglish spelling variants include: Kornoff, Karnoff, Korneff.  [Soundex Code K651]

Korobov
Коробов.
This surname originates from the term korob, meaning "box" or "basket". lEnglish spelling variants include: Korboff, Corboff.  [Soundex Code K611]

Korolev
Королев. This surname originates from the term korol, meaning "king". It is unlikely that the bearers of this surname actually descend from kings since there were never any kings in Russia, only tsars. The term "king" was known to Russians mainly from fairytales and playing cards. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who was rich, worldly, happy or imperious, or it may have been given to a child, by superstitious parents, as a sign of good luck. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code K641]

Korotaev
Коротаев.
This surname originates from the dialect term korotai, meaning "short" or "low". It is also suggested that the name may indicate someone from the region or tribe of the Karatai, a Tatar people. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K631]

Kosarev
Косарев.
This surname originates from the term kosar' meaning "mower" or "reeper", someone who cut hay with a scyth (kosa). lEnglish spelling variants include: Kasaroff, Kosareff, Kaseroff.  [Soundex Code K261]

Kositsin
Косицин.
This surname originates from the term kositsa, meaning a small or women's scyth (kosa). This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who used such a tool. lEnglish spelling variants include: Kocitzen, Kusitzin, Kositzin, Kositsen.  [Soundex Code K232]

Kosmynin
Космынин.
This patronymic surname is derived from Kosmynya, a diminutive form of the men's name Kosma. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K255]

Kosoy
Косой.
This surname originates from the term kosoy, meaning "squint-eyed" and was given to someone who matched this physical description. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K200]

Kostrikin
Кострикин.
This surname originates from the dialect term kostrika, referring to the fibrous strands of flax stem from which linen is made. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone whose occupation was the processing of flax for the making of linen, or perhaps someone who made or wore linen clothes. Note that this term also refers to "fire" as well as a "growly" or "grumpy" person.  lEnglish spelling variants include: Kostriken.  [Soundex Code K236]

Kostryukov
Кострюков.
This surname originates from the dialect term kostrika, referring to the fibrous strands of flax stem from which linen is made. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone whose occupation was the processing of flax for the making of linen, or perhaps someone who made or wore linen clothes. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K236]

Kostyuchenko
Костюченко. Th
is Ukrainian surname is derived from Kostyuk, a diminutive form of the men's name Konstantin. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K232]

Kotov
Котов.
This surname originates from the term kot, meaning "tom-cat". It is also suggested that the name can derive from Kotya, a diminutive form of the men's name Konstantin. lEnglish spelling variants include: Kotoff. [Soundex Code K310]

Kovalev
Ковалев.
This surname originates from the Ukrainian term koval, meaning "blacksmith", a craftsman who worked iron with a forge and made iron utensils, horseshoes, etc. The Ukrainian root of this name (compare the Russian term for blacksmith - kuznets) suggests that it is either a Ukrainianized Russian or a Russianized Ukrainian surname. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K141]

Koveshnikov
Ковешников. This surname originates from the term koveshnik, a master craftsman who made intricate metal casket boxes (kovtsy) for storing valuables in Old Russia. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K125]

Kozeev
Козеев.
This surname originates from the term koza, meaning "goat". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a goat, perhaps a stubborn or bearded individual. lEnglish spelling variants include: Kozeyev, Kozeff, Kozaeff, Koziev, Kizaeff.  [Soundex Code K210]

Kozlovtsev
Козловцев.
This surname originates from Kozlovets, the name given to an inhabitant of any one of several settlements named Kozlovo or Kozlov in Old Russia.  Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K241]

Kozhevnikov
Кожевников.
This surname originates from the term kozhevnik, meaning "tanner", a craftsman who tanned animal skins, hides and leathers. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K215]

Kozlov
Козлов.
This surname is derived from the term kozel, meaning "billy-goat". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a goat, perhaps a stubborn or bearded individual. lEnglish spelling variants include: Kozloff, Kozlow, Kasloff. [Soundex Code K241]

Kraichkov
Крайчков.
This surname originates from the dialect term kraichik, meaning "border", "edge", "rim" or "extremity" of a territory or thing and may refer to someone who lived near such a place. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code K622]

Krasnoslovshchikov
Краснословщиков. Thi
s surname originates from the dialect verb krasnoslovit’ meaning "to speak". Krasnoslovshchik was the term given to a "speaker" or "phrasemonger". Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K625]

Kravtsov
Кравцов.
This surname originates from the Ukrainian term kravets, meaning "tailor" - someone whose trade was making or repairing clothes. The Ukrainian root of this name (compare the Russian term for tailor - portnoi) suggests that it is either a Ukrainianized Russian or a Russianized Ukrainian surname. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K613]

Krechetov
Кречетов. Th
is surname originates from krechet, meaning "gyrfalcon", the largest species of falcon. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a falcon, perhaps a fierce, swift or keen-sighted individual. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K623]

Kremensky
Кременский.
This surname indicates a family that originated from a village named Kremeno, Kremenki or Kremensk, so called from the term kremen' meaning "flint". Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K655]

Krugov
Кругов.
This surname originates from the term krug, meaning "circle" or "ring". Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K621]

Krutiev
Крутиев.
This surname originates from the dialect term kruti, meaning "twist". This term may have been given as a nickname to an impatient, restless or fast individual. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K631]

Krylov
Крылов.
This surname is derived from the term krylo, meaning "wing". This surname was frequently given to Russian Orthodox clergy and had a specific religious connotation of "angel wings". lEnglish spelling variants include: Kriloff, Kreloff.  [Soundex Code K641]

Krysin
Крысин.
This surname originates from the term krysa, meaning "rat". This term may have been given as an uncomplimentary nickname. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K625]

Kryuchkov
Крючков.
This surname originates from the term kryuchok, meaning "hook". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone with a crooked back or hooked nose, or perhaps a petty, captious individual. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K622]

Kucherov
Кучеров. This surname originates from the term kucher, meaning "driver" (of a horse and carriage). Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K261]

Kuchinkin
Кучинкин.
This surname originates from the dialect term kachinka, meaning "duck". It is also suggested that the name indicates a family that originated from the Kachinka river in South Russia. lEnglish spelling variants include: Kushinkin.  [Soundex Code K252]

Kudashin
Кудашин.
This patronymic surname is derived from the Turkic or Mordvinian men's name Kudash. It is also suggested that the name can derive from Kudash, a diminutive form of the Russian men's name Ankudin. [Soundex Code K325]

Kudelin
Куделин.
This surname originates from the term kudel', meaning "tow", the course, broken hemp or flax fibre prepared for spinning into yarn.  Note that term also referred to an "idler" or idle individual. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K345]

Kudinov
Кудинов.
This patronymic surname is derived from Kudin, a diminutive form of the men's name Akindin.  It is also suggested that the name can derive from the Tatar term kudai, meaning "God" or "Allah". lEnglish spelling variants include: Kudenoff, Kudinoff, Kudenov.  [Soundex Code K351]

Kudryashov
Кудряшов.
This surname originates from the term kudryash, meaning "curly haired" and was given to someone who matched this physical description. lEnglish spelling variants include: Kudrashoff.  [Soundex Code K362]

Kuksov
Куксов. This surname originates from the dialect term kuksa, meaning "fist". This term may have been given as a nickname to a strong or forceful individual. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K210]

Kulagin
Кулагин.
This surname originates from the term kulaga, a type of porridge or gruel popular in Old Russia. Food nicknames such as this were popular among the agrarian Russian peasantry. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S425]

Kulikov
Куликов.
This surname originates from the term kulik, meaning "woodcock" or "snipe". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a snipe, perhaps a loud or noisy individual. lEnglish spelling variants include: Kulikoff, Kulikow.  [Soundex Code K421] 

Kunakov
Кунаков.
This surname originates from the Tatar term kunak, meaning "friend". lEnglish spelling variants include: Kunakoff, Kunacoff, Kunacov, Cunakov.  [Soundex Code K521]

Kunitsyn
Куницын. Thi
s surname originates from the term kunitsa, meaning "marten". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a marten, a trapper of martens, or perhaps someone who wore a garment of marten fur. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K532]

Kurbatov
Курбатов.
This surname originates from the Turkic term kurbat, meaning "short" or "fat". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone of short and stocky build. lEnglish spelling variants include: Koorbatoff, Kurbatoff, Kurbatow.  [Soundex Code K613]

Kurnikov
Курников.
This surname originates from the term kurnik, meaning "chicken pie". Food nicknames such as this were popular among the agrarian Russian peasantry. lEnglish spelling variants include: Kurnikoff, Kurnekoff, Kurnakoff.  [Soundex Code K652]

Kurnosov
Курносов.
This surname is derived from the term kurnosyi, meaning "snub-nosed". This term may have been given as a nickname to a someone who matched this description. lEnglish spelling variants include: Kurnosoff.  [Soundex Code K652]

Kurteev
Куртеев. This surname originates from the dialect term kurte, meaning "short". It is also suggested that the name can derive from the dialect term kurti, meaning "short jacket" or "short-tailed sheep dog". Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K631]

Kutukov
Кутуков.
This surname originates from the Turkic term kutuk, meaning "stump", "log" or "trunk". Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K 321]

Kuz'min
Кузмин.
This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Kuzma. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K255]

Kuznetsov
Кузнецов.
Kuznetsov is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It originates from the term kuznets, meaning "blacksmith", a craftsman who worked iron with a forge and made iron utensils, horseshoes, etc. lEnglish spelling variants include: Kooznetsoff, Kooznitsoff, Kusnetsoff, Kusnetzoff, Kuznetzoff, Kuznitsoff, Kuznitzoff.  [Soundex Code K253]

L -

Ladonin
Ладонин.
This patronymic surname is derived from Ladonya, a diminutive form of several men's names including EVirilad, Vladimir, Vladislav, Palladii and Elladii. lEnglish spelling variants include: Ladonen. [Soundex Code L525]

Laktionov
Лактионов.
This patronymic surname is derived from Laktion, a diminutive form of the men's name Galaktion.  Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code L235]

Lankin
Ланкин.
This patronymic surname is derived from Lanka, a diminutive form of several men's names including Evlampii, Ruslan, Svetlan and Emelian. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code L525]

Lapin
Лапин.
This surname is derived from the term lapa, meaning "paw" or "pad". lEnglish spelling variants include: Lapien.  [Soundex Code L150]

Laptev
Лаптев.
This surname is derived from the term lapot' meaning "bast shoe". This term may have been given as a nickname to a peasant who wore or made bast shoes. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code L131]

Larionov
Ларионов.
This patronymic surname is derived from Larion, a diminutive form of the men's name Illarion.  Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code L651]

Lashenko
Лашенко.
This Ukrainian surname is derived from Lasha, a diminutive form of the men's name Ilarion and the women's name Lara. lEnglish spelling variants include: Lashinko.  [Soundex Code L252]

Lashin
Лашин.
This patronymic surname is derived from Lasha, a diminutive form of the men's name Ilarion and the women's name Lara. lEnglish spelling variants include: Lashen.  [Soundex Code L250]

Lavov
Лавов. T
his surname originates from the dialect term lava, meaning "bench" or "bridge". This term may have been given as a nickname to a workman who made such articles. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code L110]

Lavrenov
Лавренов.
This patronymic surname is derived from Lavrenya, a diminutive form of the men's name Lavrentii. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code L165]

Lazarev
Лазарев.
This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Lazar. lEnglish spelling variants include: Lazareff, Lazaroff, Lazeroff, Lazarow. [Soundex Code L261]

Lazev
Лазев.
This patronymic surname is derived from Laza, a diminutive form of the men's name Lazar. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S210]

Lazutin
Лазутин.
This patronymic surname is derived from Lazuta, a diminutive form of the men's name Lazar. lEnglish spelling variants include: Lazootin.  [Soundex Code L235]

Lebedev
Лебедев.
This surname originates from the term lebed, meaning "swan". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a swan, perhaps a graceful, pure or beautiful individual. lEnglish spelling variants include: Lebedoff, Lebedeff, Lebedow.  [Soundex Code L131]

Lebeshev
Лебешев. Th
is surname originates from lebesh, which is probably a corruption of the term lobash, meaning "high-browed". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who matched this physical description. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code L121]

Leksin
Лексин.
This patronymic surname is derived from Leksa, a diminutive form of the men's names Alexei and Alexander. lEnglish spelling variants include: Lexin.  [Soundex Code L250]

Ledyaev
Ледяев.
This patronymic surname is derived from the Mordvinian men's name Ledyai. lEnglish spelling variants include: Ledieff, Lediaev, Lediaeff, Lidyoff, Ladiayoff, Lydoff.  [Soundex Code L310]

Legenko
Легенко. This
Ukrainian surname originates from the dialect term lega, meaning "thief", "sluggard" or "idler". Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code L252]

Lelikov
Леликов.
This patronymic surname is derived from Lelik, a diminutive form of the men's name Aleksander. lEnglish spelling variants include: Lelikoff.  [Soundex Code L421]

Leonov
Леонов.
This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Leon. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code L510]

Leontiev
Леонтиев.
This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Leontii. lEnglish spelling variants include: Leontieff.  [Soundex Code L531]

Lepekhin
Лепехин. Th
is surname originates from the term lepekha, meaning "pancake" or "flat cake". Note that this term also referred to a "slow, portly person". Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code L125]

Leshtaev
Лештаев. This surname originates from the Turkic term leshta, meaning "lentil". Food nicknames such as this were popular among the agrarian Russian peasantry. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code L231]

Letunov
Летунов. T
his surname originates from the dialect term letun, meaning "flying" or "one who flies". Note that this term also referred to an evil fairytale spirit of the air. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code L351]

Levashov
Левашов.
This patronymic surname is derived from Levash, a diminutive form of the men's name Lev. It is also suggested that the name can derive from derived from the term levsha, meaning "left-handed". lEnglish spelling variants include: Levashoff.  [Soundex Code L121]

Lezin
Лезин. Th
is surname originates from the term leza, meaning a "dexterous", "nimble" or "brisk" person. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who matched this physical description.  Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code L250]

Lipatov
Липатов. This surname is derived from Lipatii, a diminutive form of the men's name Ipatii. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code L131]

Lisitsyn
Лисицын.
This surname originates from the term lisitsa, meaning "fox". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a fox, perhaps a swift or cunning individual. lEnglish spelling variants include: Lisizin.  [Soundex Code L232] 

Lobachev
Лобачев. This surname originates from the dialect term lobach, meaning "high-browed". This term also referred to a "head wind" bringing opposite weather. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code L121]

Login
Логин. This surname is derived from Loga, a diminutive form of the men's names Evlogii, Longin and Filolog and the women's name Longina. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code L250]

Logutov
Логутов.
This patronymic surname is derived from Loguta, a diminutive form of the men's name Loggin. lEnglish spelling variants include: Logutoff, Logotoff, Lugotoff, Lugutoff, Lugatoff.  [Soundex Code L 231]

Lomakin
Ломакин.
This surname originates from the term lomaka, meaning "one who breaks" or "forces oneself to persuade". Note that this term also referred to a "stick". fox". Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code L525]

Losev
Лосев.
This surname is derived from the term los' meaning "elk". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who resembled an elk in some respect. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code L210]

Loskutov
Лоскутов.
This surname is derived from the term loskut, meaning "shred", "scrap" or "rag". lEnglish spelling variants include: Loscutoff, Loscotoff, Loskutoff, Loskutow, Laskutoff.  [Soundex Code L 231]

Lukin
Лукин. This
surname originates from the term luka, meaning "onion". Nicknames derived from foodstuffs were popular among the agrarian Russian peasantry. It is also suggested that the name can derive from Luka, a diminutive form of the men's name Lukyan. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code L250]

Luk'yanov
Лукьянов.
This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Lukyan. lEnglish spelling variants include: Lukianoff, Lukanoff.  [Soundex Code L251]

Luponosov
Лупоносов.
This surname is derived from the verb lupit' ("to peel") + nos ("nose"), meaning "peel the nose". It is also suggested that the name can derive from the term luponoska, a type of wild duck. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code L152]

Lysov
Лысов. This surname originates from the term lyso, meaning "bald". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who matched this physical description.  Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code L210]

Lyubashev
Любашев.
This patronymic surname is derived from Lyubasha, a diminutive form of the men's name Lybov. lEnglish spelling variants include: Lubashoff, Lebeshov, Lebeshof, Lebachoff.  [Soundex Code L121]

M -

Makarin
Макарин.
This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Makar. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code M265]

Makarov
Макаров.
This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Makar. lEnglish spelling variants include: Makaroff, Makareff.  [Soundex Code M261]

Makashev
Макашев. This
patronymic surname is derived from Makasha, a diminutive form of the men's name Makar. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code M221]

Makhnev
Махнев.
This patronymic surname is derived from Makhno, a diminutive form of several men's names including Epimakh, Makar and Matvei. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code M251]

Maksimov
Максимов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Maksim. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code M251]

Malafei
Малафей.
This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Malafei. lEnglish spelling variants include: Malofy.  [Soundex Code M 410]

Malash
Малаш
. This Ukrainian surname is derived from Malash, a diminutive form of the men's name Malakhii and the women's name Malanya.  Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code M420]

Malashikhin
Малашихин. Th
is patronymic surname is derived from Malashikha, a diminutive form of the men's name Malakhii and the women's name Malanya. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code M422]

Malin
Малин.
This surname originates from the term malyi, meaning "small". This nickname was often given to the smallest or youngest child in a family. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code M450]

Maloletkin
Малолеткин.
This surname originates from the dialect term maloletok, meaning "youth" or "adolescent". This term may have been given as a nickname to a young man or to a young soldier. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code M443]

Malyshev
Малышев. Thi
s surname originates from malysh, meaning "baby", "tot" or "infant". This nickname was often given to a child that matched this physical description. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code M421]

Mal'tsev
Мальцев.
This surname originates from malets, a diminutive form of the term malo, meaning "small". This nickname was often given to the smallest or youngest child in a family. lEnglish spelling variants include: Maltsoff, Maltseff.  [Soundex Code M432]

Mamontov
Мамонтов.
This surname originates from the term mamont, meaning "mammoth". This term may have been given as a nickname to a large, awkward or hulking individual. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code M553]

Markov
Марков.
Markov is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It is patronymic in origin and is derived from the men's name Mark. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code M621]

Markushin
Маркушин.
This patronymic surname is derived from Markusha, a diminutive form of the men's name Mark.  [Soundex Code M622]

Mashanov
Машанов. Thi
s matronymic surname is derived from Mashanya, a diminutive form of the women's name Maria. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code M251]

Maslov
Маслов.
This surname originates from the term maslo, meaning "butter" or "oil". Nicknames derived from foodstuffs were popular among the agrarian Russian peasantry. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code M241]

Matroshin
Матрошин. Th
is matronymic surname is derived from Matrosha, a diminutive form of the women's name Matrona. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code M362]

Matveev
Матвеев. Thi
s patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Matvey. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code M311]

Mazaev
Мазаев.
This surname originates from the verb mazat', meaning "to daub", "to smear" or "to grease". Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code M210] 

Mechnev
Мечнев.
This surname originates from the Old Russian term mechnyi, meaning (of or relating to) a "sword". lEnglish spelling variants include: Matchniff, Matchn. [Soundex Code M251]

Mechnikov
Мечников.
This surname originates from the term mechnik, meaning "swordsman" - a soldier armed with a sword (mech). Note that this term also referred to an "executioner". lEnglish spelling variants include: Mechnikoff, Mechnekoff.  [Soundex Code M252]

Mel'nikov
Мельников.
This surname originates from the term mel'nik, meaning "miller" - someone who owned or operated a mill for grinding grain into flour or meal. lEnglish spelling variants include: Melnikoff, Malnikoff.  [Soundex Code M452] 

Merkulov
Меркулов.
This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Merkul. lEnglish spelling variants include: Merkuloff.  [Soundex Code M624]

Meshalkin
Мешалкин.
This surname originates from the term meshalka, meaning "poker", "mixer" or "stirrer". Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code M242]

Meshcheryakov
Мещеряков.
This surname refers to someone from the region or tribe of the Meshcheryak, a Turkic people. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code M226]

Metelkin
Метелкин.
This surname originates from the term metelka, meaning "broom" or "whisk". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who made or used this tool. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code M342]

Metelnikov
Метелников.
This surname originates from the term metel'nik, meaning "sweeper" - someone whose work or occupation involved sweeping dirt, snow etc with a broom. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code M345]

Metchikov
Метчиков.
This surname originates from the term metchik, meaning "tap" or "screw-tap". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who used this tool. lEnglish spelling variants include: Metchikoff, Metchkoff, Metchekoff, Mitchikoff, Mechekoff, Mechikoff, Michikoff, Metchkow, Mechikow.  [Soundex Code M322]

Mikhailov
Михаилов.
This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Mikhailo. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.   [Soundex Code M241]

Miloserdov
Милосердов.
This surname is derived from the term miloserdie, meaning "compassion", "mercy" or "grace". This surname was frequently given to Russian Orthodox clergy. lEnglish spelling variants include: Miloserdoff, Melosardoff, Meloserdoff.  [Soundex Code M426]

Milyaev
Миляев. This surname is derived from Milya, a diminutive form of the men's names Emel'yan, Meletii, Meliton and Milii and the women's names Gemella, Emiliana, Kamilla, Lyudmila, Melaniya, Melitina, Militsa and Miliya. It is also suggested that the name can derive from Milyai, a diminutive form of the men's name Milii.  Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code M410]

Minakov
Минаков.
This patronymic surname is derived from Minak, a diminutive form of the men's name Mina. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code M521]

Minasuev
Минасyeв.
This patronymic surname is derived from Minas, a diminutive form of the men's name Mina. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code M521]

Mindrin
Миндрин.
This surname originates from the dialect term mindara or myndra, meaning "Swede" and indicates an ancestor who originated from Sweden. lEnglish spelling variants include: Mendrin, Mendren.  [Soundex Code M536]

Mironov
Миронов.
This patronymic surname is derived the men's name Miron. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code M651]

Mishin
Мишин.
This patronymic surname is derived from Misha, a diminutive form of the men's name Mikhailo.  [Soundex Code M250]

Mitrenko
Митренко.
This Ukrainian surname is derived from Mitra, a diminutive form of the men's names Dmitry and Mitrofan. lEnglish spelling variants include: Metrenko, Mitrenkov, Metrenkov, Mitrenkoff, Metrenkoff, Metrinkoff.  [Soundex Code M365]

Moiseev
Моисеев.
This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Moisei. lEnglish spelling variants include: Moisoff, Moiseff, Mosiev, Moiseve, Moiseyev, Moisev, Moiseiff, Moisser.  [Soundex Code M210]

Mokhov
Мохов.
This surname originates from the term mokh, meaning "moss" or "lichen". Botanical nicknames such as this were popular among the agrarian Russian peasantry. lEnglish spelling variants include: Mokhoff, Mokoff, Mohoff.  [Soundex Code M210]

Mokshanov
Мокшанов.
This surname refers to someone from the region or tribe of the Moksha, a Mordvinian people. It is also suggested that the name indicates a family that originated from the Moksha river in Russia. lEnglish spelling variants include: Makshanoff, Mackshanov, Mackshanoff, Mackshinoff, Makshanov, Mokshanow, Mokshinoff.  [Soundex Code M251]

Molodchenkov
Молодченков, Молодченко. Molodchenkov is a Russianization of the Ukrainian surname Molodchenko. The -v suffix ending was added after its formation. It originates from the term molodka, meaning "pullet", a young female chicken. Animal nicknames such as this were popular among the agrarian Russian peasantry. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code M432]

Molokanov
Молоканов.
This uniquely Molokan surname originates from the name of the sect, from molokan, meaning "milk-drinker". It may have been adopted by a member of the Molokan sect or given as a nickname to a non-Molokan Russian who originated from an area dominated by the sect. lEnglish spelling variants include: Molokanoff, Malakanov, Malakanow, Molokan.  [Soundex Code M425]

Molostnov
Молостнов.
This surname originates from the dialect term molost' meaning "bad weather" or "wet weather". This term may have been given as a nickname to a child whose birth was marked by such natural phenomenon. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code M423]

Mordovin
Мордовин.
This surname originates from the term mordva, and refers to someone from the region or tribe of the Mordvin people. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code M631]

Mordvinov
Мордвинов.
This surname refers to someone from the region or tribe of the Mordvin people. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code M631]

Morozov
Морозов.
Morozov is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It originates from the term moroz, meaning "frost" or "cold". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone whose demeanor was gloomy or cold, or perhaps to a child whose birth was marked by such natural phenomenon. lEnglish spelling variants include: Morozoff, Morzov, Morozow. [Soundex Code M621]

Moskalev
Москалев. This surname originates from the moskal', the nickname for a Russian living in Ukraine during pre-revolutionary times.  Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code M241]

Motylev
Мотылев.
This surname is derived from the term motylka, meaning "butterfly". Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code M341]

Mudrov
Мудров.
This surname originates from the term mudrii, meaning "wise", "sage", "intelligent", "prudent" and "clever". Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code M361]

Murav'ev
Муравьев.
This surname originates from the term muravei, meaning "ant". lEnglish spelling variants include: Muraviov, Moroviov.  [Soundex Code M611] 

Muravlev
Муравлев.
This surname originates from the dialect term muravl', meaning "ant". Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code M611] 

N -

Natarov
Натаров.
This surname is derived from the dialect verb natarivat' meaning "to leave tracks" or "to lay a path". lEnglish spelling variants include: Nataroff.  [Soundex Code N361]

Naumov
Наумов.
This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Naum. lEnglish spelling variants include: Namoff.  [Soundex Code N510]

Nazarov
Назаров.
Nazarov is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It is patronymic in origin and is derived from the men's name Nazar. lEnglish spelling variants include: Nazaroff, Nasaroff, Nazarow.  [Soundex Code N261]

Nechaev
Нечаев. This surname is derived from the term nechai, meaning "one who is not expected". This term may have been given by parents to an unexpected child. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code N210]

Nemakin
Немакин.
This surname originates from the term nemka, meaning a "German" woman. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code N525]

Nekhoroshev
Нехорошев.
This surname is derived from the term ne ("no") + khoroshii ("good") meaning "no good". This term may have been given as a pejorative nickname or by superstitious parents to a child in order to trick fate into refraining from cursing the child out of spite or envy. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code N262]

Nemanikhin
Неманихин.
This surname is derived from the term ne ("not") + manikha ("tempter" or "deceiver") meaning "one who does not deceive". This term may have been given as a nickname to an honest, straightforward, upright, trustworthy person. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code N552]

Nemtsev
Немцев.
This surname originates from the term nemets, meaning "German" and indicates an ancestor who originated from Germany. lEnglish spelling variants include: Nemsoff.  [Soundex Code N532]

Nestorenko
Несторенко.
This Ukrainian surname is derived from the men's name Nestor.  [Soundex Code N236]

Neudakhin
Неудахин. Th
is surname originates from the dialect term neudakha, meaning an "unsuccessful", "unlucky" or "failure" of a person. This term may have been given as a pejorative nickname or by superstitious parents to a child in order to trick fate into refraining from cursing the child out of spite or envy. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code N325]

Neverov
Неверов.
This surname originates from the term never, meaning "non-believer" or "infidel". This nickname was given to those who refused to accept the Russian Orthodox faith, especially non-Christians and non-Russians such as Turks, Tatars, Mordvins, etc. lEnglish spelling variants include: Neveroff, Nevaroff, Nevarov.  [Soundex Code N161]

Nevskov
Невсков (Невский). This name is properly Nevsky. The -ov suffix ending was added subsequent to its formation. It indicates a family that originated from the Neva River in northwestern Russia. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code N121]

Nikitin
Никитин.
This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Nikita. [Soundex Code N235]

Nikol'sky
Никольский.
This surname indicates a family that originated from a village named Nikol'sk, Nikol'skoye or Nikolka, so called from the men's name Nikolai. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code N242]

Nogov
Ногов.
This surname originates from the term noga, meaning "leg" or "foot". Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code N210]

Norov
Норов.
This surname is derived from the term nora, meaning "burrow", "hole" or "lair". no good". It is also suggested that the name can derive from Nora, a diminutive form of the men's names Vianor and Nikanor and the women's names Minodora, Noyabrina and Eleanora. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code N610]

Novikov
Новиков.
This surname originates from the term novik, meaning "novice". This term may have been given as a nickname to an amateur or novice. lEnglish spelling variants include: Novikoff, Novikow, Novekov, Novekoff, Novakoff, Novak.  [Soundex Code N121]

Novosel'tsev
Новосельцев.
This surname originates from the term novoselets, meaning "new settler" and refers to a newcomer to a locality. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code N 124]

Nozhin
Ножин.
This surname originates from the term nozh, meaning "knife". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who used or manufactured knives. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code N250]

Nozhkin
Ножкин.
This surname originates from the term nozhki, meaning "small feet" or "small legs", and was given to someone who matched this physical description. lEnglish spelling variants include: Noshkin.  [Soundex Code N225]

O -

Ochnev
Очнев.
This surname is derived from the term ochnoi, meaning "eye" or "ocular".  Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code O251]

Odinokin
Одинокин.
This surname originates from the term odinokii, meaning "alone", "single", "solitary" or "lonely". lEnglish spelling variants include: Odnakin.  [Soundex Code O352]

Odnov
Однов.
This surname originates from the term odno, meaning "one", "single" or "sole". This term may have been given as a nickname to an only child. lEnglish spelling variants include: Odnoff, Adnoff, Ednoff.  [Soundex Code O351]

Ogol'tsov
Огольцов.
This surname originates from the term ogolets, meaning "sea roach". Note that this term also refers to a "romp", a rough, lively play. lEnglish spelling variants include: Agal'tsov, Ogoltsov, Agalsoff, Agalzoff, Agalzov.  [Soundex Code O243]

Okhotnikov
Охотников.
This surname originates from the term okhotnik, meaning "hunter", "fowler" or "sportsman". Note that this term also refers to a "volunteer" or "amateur". lEnglish spelling variants include: Akhotnikoff, Akotnekoff, Akhotnekoff.  [Soundex Code O235]

Oparin
Опарин.
This surname originates from the term opara, meaning a "dough rising on yeast". Note that this term also referred to a "full" or "bloated" person. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code O165]

Orlov
Орлов.
This surname originates from the term orel, meaning "eagle". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a eagle, perhaps a swift, rapacious or sharp-sighted individual. lEnglish spelling variants include: Orloff, Eagles.  [Soundex Code O641]

Osipov
Осипов.
This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Osip. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code O211]

P -

Pakhomov
Пахомов.
This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Pakhom. lEnglish spelling variants include: Pakhomoff, Pahomoff, Pohomoff.  [Soundex Code P251]

Panferov
Панферов.
This patronymic surname is derived from Panfer, a diminutive form of the men's name Parfen. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P516]

Panin
Панин. This patronymic surname is derived from Panya, a diminutive form of several men's names including Pavel, Panteleimon and Polien. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P550]

Pankratov
Панкратов
. This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Pankrat. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P526]

Parshin
Паршин.
This patronymic surname is derived from Parsha, a diminutive form of the men's names Parfen, Paramon, Parmen. It is also suggested the name can derive from the dialect term parsha, meaning "gudgeon" (fish). Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P625]

Paskonin
Пасконин.
This patronymic surname is derived from Paskonya, a diminutive form of the men's names Paisii, Pasikrat, Passarion. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P255]

Patov
Патов. This surname is derived from Pata, a diminutive form of the men's names Ipatii, Patrikii, Patrokl, Sosipatr and Spartak and the women's names Kleopatra, Patrikiya and Sosipatra. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code P310]

Pavlov
Павлов.
Pavlov is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It is derived from Pavlo, a diminutive form of the men's name Pavel. lEnglish spelling variants include: Pavloff, Paveloff, Pabloff, Pablov. [Soundex Code P141]

Peresedov
Переседов.
This surname originates from the Old Russian verb peresedat' meaning "to transplant", "to replant" or "to graft". Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P623]

Petakov
Петаков.
This patronymic surname is derived from Petak, a diminutive form of the men's name Petr. lEnglish spelling variants include: Petakoff. [Soundex Code P321]

Petrov
Петров.
Petrov is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It is patronymic in origin and is derived from the men's name Petr. lEnglish spelling variants include: Petroff, Petrow.  [Soundex Code P361]

Petrushkin
Петрушкин.
This patronymic surname is derived from Petrushka, a diminutive form of the men's name Petr. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the term petrushka, meaning "parsley". lEnglish spelling variants include: Petrooshkin, Patruskin.  [Soundex Code P362]

Pichugin
Пичугин. This surname originates from the term pichuga, meaning "small bird" or "birdie". This term may have been given as an affectionate nickname. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P225]

Pigarev
Пигарев.
This surname originates from the dialect term pigar' meaning a diving, crested bird. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P261]

Pimenov
Пименов. This
patronymic surname is derived from the Old Russian men's name Pimen. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P551]

Pivovarov
Пивоваров.
This surname originates from the term pivovar, meaning "brewer" - someone whose trade was brewing beer (pivo), ale, etc. lEnglish spelling variants include: Pivovaroff, Pivavaroff, Pivovorof, Povovarof, Pivaroff.  [Soundex Code P116] 

Plotnikov
Плотников.
This surname originates from the term plotnik, meaning "carpenter", a craftsman whose work was building with wood. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P435]

Pluzhnikov
Плужников.
This surname originates from the term pluzhnik, meaning "ploughman", a peasant who worked with a plough (plug). lEnglish spelling variants include: Plujnikoff, Plujnkoff, Pluschnikow, Pluss.  [Soundex Code P425]

Podgorelov
Подгорелов. This surname originates from the term podgorel, meaning "slightly burned". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who somehow matched this description. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P326]

Podgornov
Подгорнов.
This surname originates from the term pod ("under") + gor ("mountain") and refers to someone who lived below a large hill or mountain. lEnglish spelling variants include: Podgornoff.  [Soundex Code P326]

Podkovyrov
Подковыров.
This surname originates from the verb podkovyryat', meaning "to pick on", "to tease" or "to undermine". Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P321] 

Podomarev
Подомарев. This surname is derived from podomar, meaning "sexton", an ecclesiastical official who took care of the Russian Orthodox church building, dug graves, rang the bell, etc. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code P356]

Podosin
Подосин.
This surname originates from the term pod ("under") + osen ("autumn") and may refer to a child born in autumn. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code P325]

Podosinnikov
Подосинников. This surname originates from the dialect term podosinnik, a type of wild mushroom in Russia. Food nicknames such as this were popular among the agrarian Russian peasantry. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P325]

Podsakov
Подсаков.
This surname originates from the term podsak, a hoop-net on a long staff used by fishermen in Old Russia to catch fish. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who manufactured or used this tool. lEnglish spelling variants include: Podsakoff, Podsiekoff, Podsekoff.  [Soundex Code P322]

Poletov
Полетов. This
surname originates from the dialect term poletai, meaning "flying", "fast" or "quick". Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P431]

Polstov
Полстов.
This surname originates from the term polst' meaning "felt", "layer", "cloth" or "rag". lEnglish spelling variants include: Polstoff, Spolsdoff.  [Soundex Code P423]

Polyanin
Полянин.
This matronymic surname is derived from Polyana, a diminutive form of the women's names Polina and Apollinariya. lEnglish spelling variants include: Polanin, Planin. [Soundex Code P455]

Pominov
Поминов. Th
is surname originates from the term pomin, meaning "mention" or "remembrance". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone in remembrance of some person or event. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P551]

Ponomarev
Пономарев.
This surname originates from the term ponomar, meaning "sexton", an ecclesiastical official who took care of the Russian Orthodox church building, dug graves, rang the bell, etc. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P556]

Popin
Попин.
This surname originates from the term pop, meaning a Russian Orthodox "priest". lEnglish spelling variants include: Papen, Pappin, Papin, Poppin.  [Soundex Code P150]

Popkov
Попков.
This surname originates from the dialect term popko, meaning a Russian Orthodox "priest". Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P121]

Popov
Попов.
Popov is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It originates from the term pop, a Russian Orthodox "priest". lEnglish spelling variants include: Popoff, Popove, Papove, Papov, Papoff, Popow.  [Soundex Code P110]

Poroshin
Порошин. This surname
originates from the term porosh, meaning "newly fallen snow" or "grain of powder". This term may have been given as a nickname to a child whose birth was marked by a snowfall. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P625]

Portnov
Портнов.
This surname originates from the term portnoi, meaning "tailor" - someone whose trade was making or repairing clothes. lEnglish spelling variants include: Portnoff, Partnof, Partnoff, Partnov.  [Soundex Code P635] 

Potapov
Потапов.
This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Potap. lEnglish spelling variants include: Potapoff, Potopoff, Potapow, Potopov, Patapov, Patopoff, Patapoff.  [Soundex Code P311]

Poteshnichenko
Потешниченко. This Ukrainian surname is derived from the term poteshnik, meaning "one who amuses". This term was given as a nickname to someone whose behavior or personality matched this description.  [Soundex Code P325] 

Potryasov
Потрясов. This surname originates from the verb potryasat' meaning "to shake", "to jolt", "to trouble" or "to disturb". Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P362]

Pravdin
Правдин.
This surname originates from the term pravda, meaning "truth". This term may have been given as a nickname to an honest or fair person. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P613]

Pribylev
Прибылев.
This surname is derived from the term pribyloi, meaning "newcomer", "arrival", "visitor" or "new issue". This term may have been given as a nickname to a newborn child. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P614]

Primakov
Примаков. This surname is derived from the term primak, meaning the son-in-law accepted into the household of the father-in-law.  This term may have been given as a nickname to a person who matched this description. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P652]

Prokhanov
Проханов
. This patronymic surname is derived from Prokhan, a diminutive form of the men's name Prokhor. [Soundex Code P625]

Prokhorov
Прохоров.
This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Prokhor. lEnglish spelling variants include: Prohoroff, Prohroff, Prohoff, Prohov.  [Soundex Code P626]

Prokof'ev
Прокофьев.
This patronymic surname is derived from Prokofy, a diminutive form of the men's name Prokopy. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P621]

Proskudin
Проскудин.
This matronymic surname is derived from the women's name Proskudiya. lEnglish spelling variants include: Proscudin, Prascudin, Proscudine.  [Soundex Code P623]

Pudov
Пудов.
This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Pud. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the term pud, a unit of measure used in Old Russia. lEnglish spelling variants include: Padoff, Pudoff.  [Soundex Code P310]

Pushkarev
Пушкарев.
This surname originates from the term pushkar, meaning "gunner" - an artillery soldier dealing with heavy and mounted cannons, guns, etc. lEnglish spelling variants include: Pushkarow.  [Soundex Code P226] 

Puzanov
Пузанов. T
his surname originates from the dialect term puzan, meaning "big-bellied" or "fat". This term was given as a nickname to someone who matched this description. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P251]

Puzikov
Пузиков. This surname originates from the dialect term puzik, meaning "big-bellied". This term was given as a nickname to someone who matched this description. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P221]

R -

 

Radchenko
Радченко. This Ukrainian surname is derived from from Radka, a diminutive form of the men's names Rada or Rodion. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code R325]

Radiontsev
Радионцев.
This surname originates from Radionets, a diminutive form of the men's name Rodion.  This term may also refer to an inhabitant of any one of several settlements named Radionka or Radionovo in Old Russia. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code R353]

Rakhmanov
Рахманов.
This is a Russianized Turkic surname derived from the term Rakhman, meaning "The Compassionate" - one of the Turkic names of God. Surnames of this type were frequently borne by the descendants of Tatar nobles who transfered their allegiance to the Russian Tsars during the 15th and 16th centuries. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code R255]

Rakov
Раков.
This surname originates from the term rak, meaning "crab" or "crawfish". Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code R210]

Rassokhin
Рассохин.
This surname originates from the term rassokha, meaning "fork" and refers to someone who lived near the fork of a road or a river. lEnglish spelling variants include: Rassokin, Rassikin.  [Soundex Code R225]

Razumov
Разумов. Thi
s surname originates from the term razum, meaning "reason", "sense" or "intellect". This term may have been given as a nickname to a clever, sensible, judicious or quick-witted individual. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code R251]

Razvalyaev
Разваляев.
This surname originates from the verb razvalyat', meaning "to pull down", "to roll" or "to crush". lEnglish spelling variants include: Razvaliaeff.  [Soundex Code R214] 

Remezov
Ремезов.
This surname originates from the term remez, meaning "tomtit" or "wren". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of an wren, perhaps an industrious, talkative or singing individual. lEnglish spelling variants include: Remezoff, Ramzoff.  [Soundex Code R521]

Reshetov
Решетов.
This surname originates from the term resheto, meaning "sieve" or "screen". lEnglish spelling variants include: Reshatoff.  [Soundex Code R231] 

Rodionov
Родионов.
This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Rodion. lEnglish spelling variants include: Radinoff.  [Soundex Code R351]

Rogov
Рогов.
This surname originates from the term rog, meaning "horn" or "antler". Note that this term also refers to any musical instrument resembling a horn in shape and sounded by blowing into the smaller end. lEnglish spelling variants include: Rogoff.  [Soundex Code R210]

Romanenko
Романенко.
This Ukrainian surname is derived from the men's name Roman. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code R555]

Romanov
Романов.
Romanov is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It is patronymic in origin and is derived from the men's name Roman. lEnglish spelling variants include: Romanoff. [Soundex Code R551]

Rozanov
Розанов. This surname originates from the term roza, meaning "flower". This surname was frequently given to Russian Orthodox clergy and seminary students. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code R251]

Rudakov
Рудаков. This surname originates from the term rudak, meaning "red" or "ochre-colored". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone with reddish hair color or complexion. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code R321]

Rudenko
Руденко.
This Ukrainian surname is derived from the term ruda, meaning "ochre-colored". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone with reddish hair color. lEnglish spelling variants include: Roudenko.  [Soundex Code R352]

Rudometkin
Рудометкин.
This surname originates from the term rudometka, meaning a female "blood-letter". The letting of blood by opening a vein or the application of leeches was a common remedy for all manner of illness and disease in Old Russia. Note that this surname was borne by Maxim Rudometkin, co-founder of the Pryguny branch of Molokans in Tambov province, Russia in the mid 19th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Rudametkin, Ruddy.  [Soundex Code R353] 

Rusakov
РусаковThis surname originates from rusak, an Old Russian term for a fair-haired person.  This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who matched this description.  Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code R221]

Ryashentsev
Ряшенцев.
This surname originates from Ryashenets, the name given to an inhabitant of the Russian city of Ryazhska, south of Moscow . Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code R253]

Ryazanov
Рязанов.
This surname indicates a family that originated from Riazan province, south-east of Moscow. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code R251]

Ryl'kov
Рыльков.
This surname originates from the term rylo, meaning "face", "mug", "muzzle" or "snout". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone with a prominent face, mouth or nose. lEnglish spelling variants include: Rilkoff, Reilkoff, Rielkoff, Relkov, Rilcof, Relkoff, Rilcoff, Rilkov.  [Soundex Code R421]

Ryzhkov
Рыжков.
This surname originates from the term ryzhko, meaning "red". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone with reddish hair color. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code R221]

S -

Sachkov
Сачков. Thi
s surname originates from the term sachok, meaning "net". This term may have been given as a nickname to a net-maker or perhaps a hunter, fisherman or other user of nets. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S221]

Sadovnikov
Садовников. T
his surname originates from the term sadovnik, meaning "gardener", a person engaged in the craft of gardening. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S315]

Sakharov
Сахаров. This surname originates from the term sakhar, meaning "sugar" or "sweet". This term may have been given as an affectionate nickname. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S261]

Salamatin
Саламатин.
This surname originates from the term salamata, a type of porridge or gruel popular in Old Russia. Food nicknames such as this were popular among the agrarian Russian peasantry. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S453]

Saltykov
Салтыков.
This surname is derived from the Turkic term saltyk, meaning "sold". Surnames of this type were typically borne by the descendants of Tatar nobles who transfered their allegiance to the Russian Tsars during the 15th and 16th centuries. lEnglish spelling variants include: Saltikoff, Saltikov, Saltekoff, Soltikoff.  [Soundex Code S432]

Samarin
Самарин.
This surname indicates a family that originated from Samara province, east of Moscow. Note that this surname was borne by Molokan writer and organizer Ivan Samarin (1857-1948). lEnglish spelling variants include: Samaroff. [Soundex Code S565] 

Samodurov
Самодуров.
This surname originates from the term samodur, meaning "petty tyrant". This term may have been given as a nickname to a stubborn or obstinate individual. lEnglish spelling variants include: Samaduroff, Samoduroff, Somaduroff.  [Soundex Code S536]

Samokhin
Самохин.
This patronymic surname is derived from Samokha, a diminutive form of the men's names Samei, Samon and Samuil. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S525]

Samokhvalov
Самохвалов.
This surname is derived from the term samo ("one's self") + the verb khvalit' ("to praise") meaning "one who gives praise to one's self". This term may have been given as a nickname to a boastful or arrogant individual. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S521]

Samov
Самов.
This patronymic surname is derived from the Old Russian men's name Samei. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the term sam, meaning "one's self". lEnglish spelling variants include: Samoff.  [Soundex Code S510]

Samsonov
Самсонов.
This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Samson. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S525]

Sandykov
Сандыков.
This surname is derived from the Turkic term sandyk, meaning "chest" or "box". Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S532]

Sanov
Санов.
This patronymic surname is derived from Sana, a diminutive form of the men's names Alexander and Disan. lEnglish spelling variants include: Sanoff.  [Soundex Code S510]

Sautin
Саутин.
This patronymic surname is derived from Sauta, a diminutive form of the men's name Savva. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the dialect term sautka, meaning "duck". lEnglish spelling variants include: Sauten, Saootin. [Soundex Code S350]

Savchenko
Савченко.
This Ukrainian surname is derived from Savka, a diminutive form of the men's names Savva and Savely. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S125]

Savel'ev
Савельев.
This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Savely. lEnglish spelling variants include: Saveliff. [Soundex Code S141]

Savinov
Савинов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Savin. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S151]

Sayapin 
 Саяпин. The etymology of this surname is difficult to determine. It is possible that it is derived from the dialect verb tsyapati, meaning "to drip" or "to trickle". It is also possible that the root of the name, Sayapa or perhaps Syapa, is a rare diminutive form of some men's name such as Sapron, Savely, etc.
lEnglish spelling variants include: Siapin, Syapin, Seapin, Seaking.  [Soundex Code S150]

Sedoikin 
 Седоикин. This surname originates from the term sedoi, meaning "grey" and may refer to someone with grey hair or eyes. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the Mordvinian men's name Sedoi.
Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S325]

Seleznev
Селезнев.
This surname originates from the term selezen' meaning "drake" (a male duck). This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a duck. lEnglish spelling variants include: Seleznoff, Siliznoff.  [Soundex Code S425]

Seliverstov
Селиверстов.
This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Seliverst. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S416]

Semenikhin
Семенихин. This patronymic surname is derived from Semenikha, a diminutive form of the men's name Semyon. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S552]

Semenishchev
Семенищев.
This patronymic surname is derived from Semenische, a diminutive form of the men's name Semyon. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S552]

Semenkov
Семенков.
This patronymic surname is derived from Semenka, a diminutive form of the men's name Semyon. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S552]

Semenov
Семенов.
Semenov is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It is patronymic in origin and is derived from the men's name Semyon. lEnglish spelling variants include: Semenoff, Simenoff, Seminoff, Siminoff, Simonoff.  [Soundex Code S551]

Semenovich
Семенович.
This Ukrainian surname is derived from the men's name Semyon. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S551]

Semiletov
Семилетов.
This surname originates from the term semiletnii, meaning "seven years".  This term may have been given as a nickname to a seven year-old child. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S543]

Sergeev
Сергеев.
This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Sergei. lEnglish spelling variants include: Serguiff, Sergeiff.  [Soundex Code S621]

Seryaev
Серяев. This patronymic surname is derived from Serya, a diminutive form of the men's name Sergei.  Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S610]

Shabalin
Шабалин.
This surname originates from the dialect term shabala, meaning "rags", "scraps" or "lumps". Note that this term also referred to a "talker" or "loafer". lEnglish spelling variants include: Shabalen.  [Soundex Code S145]

Shaposhnikov
Шапошников. This
surname originates from the term shaposhnik, meaning "hatter", a craftsman who manufactured, sold or cleaned hats and headwear. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code S125]

Shashkin
Шашкин.
This surname originates from the term shashka, meaning "draughts", an ancient Russian board game. Note that this term also referred to a "Caucasian sabre". It is also suggested that the name can derive from Shashko, a diminutive form of the men's name Alexander. Soundex Code S225]

Shchegolev
Щеголев, Щеглов. This surname originates from the nickname shchegol, meaning "foppish", "elegant", "dandy", "smart" and "boastful". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone whose personality matched this description. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S224]

Shcherbakov
Щербаков.
Shcherbakov is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It originates from the term shcherbak, meaning "pock-marked" or "gap-toothed". Note that this term also referred to a "userer". lEnglish spelling variants include: Scherbakoff, Shcherbakoff, Scherbekoff, Sherbakoff, Sherbakov, Sherr.  [Soundex Code S261; S612]

Shchetinin
Щетинин.
This surname is derived from the term shchetina meaning "bristle". Note that this term also referred to a "bristly" or "abrupt" person. lEnglish spelling variants include: Schetinin, Schetinen, Scheetinin, Shetinin.  [Soundex Code S235]

Shchetinkin
Щетинкин.
This surname is derived from the term shchetinka meaning "bristle". Note that this term also referred to a "bristly" or "abrupt" person. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S235]

Shchukin
Щукин.
This surname originates from the term shchuka, meaning "pike" fish. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a pike. lEnglish spelling variants include: Shukin, Shuken.  [Soundex Code S250]

Shepelev
Шепелев. This surname originates from the dialect term shepel, meaning an "iron shovel" used to clear stumps after a fire.  The term may have been given as a nickname to someone who made or used this implement. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S141]

Shestenko
Шестенко.
This Ukrainian surname originates from the term shest' meaning "six". This term may have been given as a nickname to the sixth child in a family. lEnglish spelling variants include: Shesenko.  [Soundex Code S235]

Shinin
Шинин.
This surname originates from the dialect term shina, meaning "trunk". Note that this term also referred to a "rail", "iron bar", "hoop" or "wheel band". lEnglish spelling variants include: Shinen, Shenin. [Soundex Code S550]

Shishlinov
Шишлинов.
This name is properly Shishlin. The -ov suffix ending was added after the surname was originally formed. It originates from the verb shishlyat', meaning "to dig" or "to delay". Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S245]

Shishlyannikov
Шишлянников. Thi
s surname originates from the dialect term shishlyannik, meaning "digger", a laborer who digs. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S245]

Shitukhin
Шитухин.
This surname originates from the dialect term shitukha, meaning a type of "decked boat". This term may have been given as a nickname to a maker or perhaps sailor of such a boat. lEnglish spelling variants include: Shetukin, Shetuchin, Shetookin.  [Soundex Code S325]

Shmakov
Шмаков.
This surname originates from the dialect term shmak, meaning "tasty". Note that this dialect term also referred to a funnel with a trench used by smiths for casting metal. lEnglish spelling variants include: Shmakoff.  [Soundex Code S521]

Shmelev
Шмелев. This surname is derived from the term shmel' meaning "bumblebee". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a falcon, perhaps a busy, hard-working or buzzing individual. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S541]

Shnyakin
Шнякин. This
surname originates from the dialect term shnyaka, meaning "sea boat". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who made or used such a vessel. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S525]

Shubin
Шубин.
This surname originates from the term shuba, meaning "fur coat". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who wore a shuba, or perhaps a maker of such garments. Shubin is the most common Molokan surname in America. lEnglish spelling variants include: Shuben, Schubin.  [Soundex Code S150]

Shutov
Шутов.
This surname originates from the term shut, meaning "clown", "jester" or "fool". Note that this term also referred to an evil fairytale spirit. lEnglish spelling variants include: Shutoff, Chutoff.  [Soundex Code S310]

Shvetsov
Швецов.
This surname originates from the dialect term shvets, meaning "tailor" - someone whose trade was making or repairing clothes.  Note that this surname was borne by S. A. Shvetsov, leader of the Molokans in Tambov province, Russia in the late 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Shvetsoff.  [Soundex Code S132]

Sidortsev
Сидорцев.
This patronymic surname is derived from Sidorets, a diminutive form of the men's name Sidor. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S363]

Sirotov
Сиротов.
This surname is derived from the term sirota, meaning "orphan". Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S631]

Skorodumov
Скородумов.
This surname originates from the dialect term skorodum, meaning "resolute" or "resourceful".  This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who matched this description. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S635]

Skorokhodov
Скороходов. Thi
s surname originates from the term skorokhod, meaning "fast walker", "courier" or "foot-messenger". Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S623]

Skrinkov
Скринков.
This surname originates from the dialect term skrinka, meaning "chest" or "box". It is also suggested that the name can derive from the term skrynnik, meaning "chest-maker". lEnglish spelling variants include: Scrinkov.  [Soundex Code S652]

Slavin
Славин.
This patronymic surname is derived from Slava, a diminutive form of the men's name Vacheslav. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the term slava, meaning "glory". lEnglish spelling variants include: Slaven, Slevin.  [Soundex Code S415]

Slepnikov
Слепников.
This surname originates from the term slepnik, meaning "blind person". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who was short-sighted or blind (slepoi). lEnglish spelling variants include: Slepnikoff.  [Soundex Code S415]

Slivkov
Сливков.
This surname originates from the term slivki, meaning "cream". It is also suggested that the name can derive from the dialect term slivka, meaning "plum". lEnglish spelling variants include: Slivkoff, Slevcove, Slevkoff, Slevkov, Slivkow, Slifkoff.  [Soundex Code S412]

Smirnov
Смирнов. Smirnov is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It originates from the term smirnyi, meaning "timid", "quiet" or "peaceful". Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S565]

Smolin
Смолин.
This surname derives from the term smola, meaning "tar". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone with black hair, or perhaps an annoying, constant person. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S545]

Sobolev
Соболев.
This surname originates from the term sobol'  meaning "sable". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who kept sables, a sable-skin dealer, or someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a sable. lEnglish spelling variants include: Soboloff, Soboleff, Sobolew.  [Soundex Code S141]

Soborov
Соборов. This surname originates from the term sobor, meaning "cathedral", "council", "assembly" or "synod". Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code S161]

Sofonov
Софонов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Sofon. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code S151]

Sofronov
Софронов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Sofron. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code S165]

Sokhryakov
Сохряков.
This surname is derived from the verb sokhranyat' meaning "to conserve", "to maintain", "to keep" or "to observe". lEnglish spelling variants include: Sakrekoff, Sakrekov, Sohriakoff, Sohrakoff, Soriakoff, Sochrekow.  [Soundex Code S262]

Sokolov
Соколов.
This surname originates from the term sokol, meaning "falcon". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a falcon, perhaps a fierce, swift or keen-sighted individual. Note that this surname was borne by Lukian Sokolov, co-founder of the Pryguny branch of Molokans in Tambov province, Russia in the mid 19th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Sokoloff.  [Soundex Code S241]

Solomakhin
Соломахин.
This surname originates from the term solomakha, a type of porridge or gruel popular in Old Russia. Food nicknames such as this were popular among the agrarian Russian peasantry. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S452]

Solomentsev
Соломенцев. This surname originates from the dialect term solomenets, meaning a "hay shed" and may refer to someone who lived at such a place. It may also refer to an inhabitant of any one of several places named Solomenny, Solomennoye or Solomino in Old Russia. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S455]

Solonitsyn
Солоницын. Thi
s surname originates from the dialect term solonitsa, meaning "saltcellar". It is also suggested that the name indicates a family that originated from the region of the Solonitsa River in the Kostroma or Novogorod areas. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S453]

Solopov
Солопов.
This surname originates from the dialect term solopyi, meaning “gaper” or “starer”. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the dialect verb solopit' meaning "to look stupid". Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S411]

Solov'ev
Соловьев.
This surname originates from the term solovei, meaning "nightingale". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone whose singing voice was beautiful like that of a nightingale. lEnglish spelling variants include: Soloveoff, Soloveow, Soloveyov, Solovov, Solovioff, Solovieff, Solovev, Soloviov, Solovyov, Solovyev.  [Soundex Code S411]

Sopin
Сопин.
This surname originates from the verb sopiit' meaning to "snore", "snort" or "wheeze". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who breathed violently and noisily while awake or asleep. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.   [Soundex Code S110]

Sopuntsov
Сопунцов.
This surname is derived from the verb sopiit' meaning to "snuffle". Sopunets was the nickname given to a sniffler, someone who breathed noisily due to a cold or congestion. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S153]

Sorokin
Сорокин.
This surname originates from the term soroka, meaning "magpie". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a magpie, perhaps a cunning, noisy or pilfering individual. lEnglish spelling variants include: Sarokin.  [Soundex Code S625]

Sosin
Сосин. This patronymic surname is derived from Sosa, a diminutive form of the men's name Sosipatr. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the dialect term sosya, meaning a "thumb-sucking child". Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S250]

Spiridonov
Спиридонов. Th
is patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Spiridon. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S163]

Starostin
Старостин.
This surname originates from the term starosta, meaning "village elder". Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S362]

Stepanov
Степанов.
This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Stepan. lEnglish spelling variants include: Stepanoff.  [Soundex Code S315]

Stoyalov
Стоялов.
This surname originates from the verb stoyat', meaning "to stay", "to lodge" or "to stand". Stoyalets was the term given to a tenant or lodger. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S341]

Strakhov
Страхов.
This surname originates from the term strakh, meaning "fear", "dread" or "terror". This term may have been given as a nickname to a frightful or timid individual. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S362]

Strekalov
Стрекалов. Th
is surname originates from strekalo, the dialect term used to describe a person who "rustles", "cracks", "skips" or who is "prompt to jump" or "prompt to run". Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S362]

Strel'nikov
Стрельников. This surname originates from the term strelnik, meaning "archer". Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S364]

Stupenkin
Ступенкин. This surname originates from the dialect term stupen' meaning "step". Stupenka was the term for a "ladder", "porch", "cross-beam" or "board" onto which one steps. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S315]

Stupin
Ступин.
This surname originates from the dialect term stupa, meaning "fat" or "slow". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who matched this description. lEnglish spelling variants include: Stoopin.  [Soundex Code S315]

Suchkin
Сучкин.
This surname originates from the term suchok, meaning a small "branch", "twig", "bough" or "knot". Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S221]

Suchkov
Сучков.
This surname originates from the term suchok, meaning a small "branch", "twig", "bough" or "knot". lEnglish spelling variants include: Suchkoff, Soochkoff.  [Soundex Code S221]

Sudakov
Судаков.
This surname is derived from the term sudak, meaning "zander" fish. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S321]

Sukhov
Сухов.
This surname originates from the term sukhoi, meaning "dry", "thin", "spare" or "lean".  This term may have been given as a nickname to someone whose demeanor was cold or unfriendly, or perhaps a thin or sickly individual. lEnglish spelling variants include: Sukhoff, Suhoff, Suhow, Suhovy.  [Soundex Code S210]

Sukovitsin
Суковицин.
This surname originates from the dialect term sukovitsa, meaning "birch sap". Birch sap was used as a medicine and tonic in Old Russia. lEnglish spelling variants include: Sukovitzen.  [Soundex Code S213]

Sulimov
Сулимов.
This patronymic surname is derived from the Turkic men's name Sulim. lEnglish spelling variants include: Sulimoff.  [Soundex Code S451]

Sundukov
Сундуков.
This surname originates from the term sunduk, meaning "chest", "box" or "trunk". Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S532]

Suprunuk
Супрунук.
This Ukrainian surname is derived from Suprun, a diminutive form of the men's name Sofron.  [Soundex Code S165]

Surkov
Сурков.
This surname derives from the term surok, meaning "marmot" or "woodchuck". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a marmot, perhaps a sleepy, dense, solitary, small, clumsy or idle individual. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S621]

Sushilin
Сушилин.
This surname originates from the dialect term sushilo, meaning "hard" or "dry". Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S245]

Susoev
Сусоев.
This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Susoi. lEnglish spelling variants include: Susoyeff, Sisoev, Sissoev, Sissov, Sissoyev, Susew, Susoff, Suesov, Suesoff, Susoev, Susov, Sussoev, Susoeff, Sosoyoff, Sysoyev, Sessoyeff, Sysoev.  [Soundex Code S210]

Suvorov
Суворов.
This surname originates from the term suvora, meaning "grim". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone whose demeanor was grim, harsh or stern. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S161]

Suzdal'tsev
Суздальцев. This surname is derived from Suzdalets, the term for an inhabitant of the town of Suzdal, north-east of Moscow. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S234]

Svikhnushin
Свихнушин. This surname originates from the dialect verb svikhnut' meaning "to shift", "to break" or to "dislocate". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone with a dislocated joint or to someone dislocated in the broader physical, cultural, spiritual or emotional sense. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S125]

 Sychov
Сычов. Thi
s surname originates from the term sych, meaning "horned owl". Note that this term also referred to a gloomy or unsociable person. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S210]

Syrkov
Сырков.
This surname originates from the term syrka, meaning "grape vinegar". Food nicknames such as this were popular among the agrarian Russian peasantry. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S621]

Syrovatkin
Сыроваткин. Thi
s surname originates from the term syrovatka, meaning "whey", the watery part of milk that is separated from the curd in making cheese. Nicknames derived from foodstuffs were popular among the agrarian Russian peasantry. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code S613]

T -

Talanov
Таланов. This surname originates from the dialect term talana, meaning "success" or "luck". This term may have been given as a nickname to a child, by superstitious parents, as a sign of good luck. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code T451]

Talochkin
Талочкин. This surname is derived from Talochka, a diminutive form of the men's names Vitalii, Vitalik and Natalii and the women's names Vitalika, Vitalina, Vitaliya, Nataliha and Taisiya. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code T422]

Tananaev
Тананаев. This
patronymic surname is derived from Tananai, a diminutive form of the men's names Atanas or Afanasy. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code T 551]

Taranov
Таранов.
This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Taran. lEnglish spelling variants include: Taranoff, Terinoff, Taranow, Tarnoff. [Soundex Code T651]

Tarusov
Тарусов.
This surname indicates a family that originated from the Old Russian town of Tarus. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code T 621]

Telegin
Телегин.
This surname originates from the term telega, meaning "cart". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who drove or manufactured carts. lEnglish spelling variants include: Telegen, Tellegen, Tellegin, Telegan, Telligin.  [Soundex Code T425]

Tepikin
Тепикин.
This surname may originate from the Turkic term tepik, meaning "ball". It is also suggested that the name can derive from a corruption of the term tupik, meaning "blockhead" or "dolt". Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code T125]

Terekhov
Терехов.
This patronymic surname is derived from Terekh, a diminutive form of the men's name Terentii. lEnglish spelling variants include: Terekoff, Terehoff, Terichow, Terrichoff, Terikow, Terikhoff, Terikoff.  [Soundex Code T621]

Tershukov
Тершуков.
This patronymic surname is derived from Tereshuk, a diminutive form of several men's names including Terentii, Tertii, Nester  and Proterii. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code T622]

Tikhonov
Тихонов.
This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Tikhon. lEnglish spelling variants include: Teckenoff, Tickenoff, Tikonoff, Tikunoff, Tikunov, Tehanoff, Tekanoff, Tekunoff, Tickunoff, Tikhonoff, Tekanow, Tickonoff, Tehanow, Tigunoff, Tihanoff. [Soundex Code T251]

Tikunov
Тикунов. Thi
s surname originates from the Hebrew term tikun, a book used by Jews to prepare for reading or writing a Torah scroll. The term may have been given as a nickname to a Russian Jew who used such a book. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code T251]

Timofeev
Тимофеев.
This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Timofei. lEnglish spelling variants include: Timofeeff. [Soundex Code T511]

Titkov
Титков.
This patronymic surname is derived from Titko, a diminutive form of the Old Russian men's name Tit. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code T321]

Titov
Титов.
This patronymic surname is derived from the Old Russian men's name Tit. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code T310]

Tobakarev
Табакарев. Th
is surname originates from the dialect term tabakar, meaning "tobacconist" or "tobacco-seller". Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code T126]

Tolmachev
Толмачев.
This surname originates from the term tolmach, meaning "interpreter". lEnglish spelling variants include: Tolmachoff, Tolmacheff, Talmachoff. [Soundex Code T452]

Tolmasov
Толмасов.
This surname originates from the Tatar men's name Tolmas. lEnglish spelling variants include: Tolmasoff, Tolmosoff, Tolmsoff, Tolmas, Tholmasoff, Thomas.  [Soundex Code T452]

 Tolopeev
Толопеев. Thi
s surname originates from the term tulup, meaning "sheepskin coat". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who made or perhaps wore this peasant garment. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.   [Soundex Code T411]

Tolstoy
Толстой.
This surname originates from the term tolstoi, meaning "fat". This term was given as a nickname to a someone who matched this description. lEnglish spelling variants include: Tolstoi, Tolstoj.  [Soundex Code T423] 

Tomilin
Томилин.
This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Tomila. lEnglish spelling variants include: Tamelin, Tomlin, Tamalin, Tomelin.  [Soundex Code T545]

Treglazov
Треглазов.
This surname originates from the term tre ("three") + glaz ("eye"), meaning "three-eyed". This term may have been given as a nickname to a foresighted or keen-sighted individual. lEnglish spelling variants include: Treglazoff, Treglasoff, Triglass.  [Soundex Code T624]

Tregubov
Трегубов.
This surname originates from the term tre ("three") + gub ("lip"), meaning "three-lipped". This term was given as a nickname to a someone with a cleft, deformed or hair lip. lEnglish spelling variants include: Treguboff.  [Soundex Code T621]

Tretyakov
Третяков.
This surname originates from the term tretyak, meaning "third". This term may have been given as a nickname to the third child in a family. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code T632]

Trunilin
Трунилин.
This surname originates from the verb trunit', meaning "to mock" or "to ridicule". Trunila was the term given to a "mocker" or "scoffer". Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code T654]

Trushchalev
Трущалев.
This surname originates from the verb treshchat', meaning "to crack", "to crackle" or "to rattle". Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code T622]

Tsaplev
Цаплев.
This surname originates from the dialect term tsaplya, meaning “seagull” or “heron”. Note that this term also referred to a “captious” or “petty” person. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code T214]

Tsirkin
Циркин.
This surname is derived from the dialect verb tsirkat' meaning "to chirp".  In Russia, birds and insects make a sound perceived as tsirk-tsirk.  This term may have been given as a nickname to a noisy or whining child.  Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code T262]

Tulupov
Тулупов.
This surname originates from the term tulup, meaning "sheepskin coat". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who wore a tulup, or perhaps a maker of such garments. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code T411]

Tumanov
Туманов.
This surname originates from the term tuman, meaning "fog", "mist" or "haze". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone whose demeanor was gloomy or melancholy, or perhaps to a child whose birth was marked by such natural phenomenon. lEnglish spelling variants include: Tumanoff. [Soundex Code T551]

Tyrnov
Тырнов. T
his surname originates from the dialect term tyrn, meaning "sloe", the berry fruit of the blackthorn. Food nicknames such as this were popular among the agrarian Russian peasantry. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code T651] 

U -

Udaltsev
Удалцев.
This surname originates from the term udalets, meaning a "bold" or "daring" man. This term may have been given as a nickname to a rash or venturesome individual. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code U343]

Uklein
Уклеин.
This surname is derived from the term ukleya, meaning "bleak" fish. Note that this surname was borne by Semeon Uklein, co-founder of the Molokan movement in Tambov province, Russia in the late 18th century. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code U245]

Uryupin
Урюпин. This surname originates from the dialect term uryupa, meaning “the nurse", "the crybaby" or "sloven". Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code U615]

Usachev
Усачев.
This surname originates from the term usach, meaning "bushy moustache". This term would have been given as a nickname to a man with a broad, bushy moustache. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code U221]

Ushakov
Ушаков. This
surname originates from the Turkic term ushak, meaning "undersized", "petty mind" or "slanderer". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who matched this description. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code U221] 

Ustrashkin
Устрашкин.
This surname originates from the verb ustrashat' meaning "to intimidate", "to daunt" or "to frighten". The term ustrashka may have ben given as a nickname to an intimidating, frightening individual. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code U236]

Uvarov
Уваров.
This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Uvar. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code U161]

V -

Vakulin
Вакулин. This patronymic surname originates from the men's name Vakul. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code V245]

Valov
Валов.
This surname originates from Valya, a diminutive form of several men's names including Valent, Valerian and Valerii. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the term val, meaning "shaft" or "roller". lEnglish spelling variants include: Valoff, Voloff, Veloff.  [Soundex Code V410]

Varkov
Варков.
This surname originates from the term varka, meaning "boiling", "cooking" or "brewing". lEnglish spelling variants include: Varkoff, Warkoff, Warcoff.  [Soundex Code V621]

Vashnikov
Вашников.
This patronymic surname is derived from Vashnik, a diminutive form of the men's name Vasily. lEnglish spelling variants include: Vashnikoff.  [Soundex Code V 252]

Vasil'ev
Васильев. Vasil'ev is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It originates from the men's name Vasily. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code V241]

Vas'kov
Васьков. This patronymic surname is derived from Vas'ka, a diminutive form of the men's name Vasily. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code V210] 

Vavilov
Вавилов. This patronymic surname is derived from the Old Russian men's name Vavilo. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code V141]

Vechkanov
Вечканов.
This patronymic surname is derived from the Mordvinian men's name Vechkan. lEnglish spelling variants include: Vechkanoff, Vechkonoff, Vichkanoff, Vichkonoff, Vickonoff.  [Soundex Code V225]

Vedenov
Веденов. Th
is patronymic surname is derived from Vedenya, a diminutive form of the men's name Venedikt. lEnglish spelling variants include: Vedenoff, Vedeniev, Vidinoff, Videnoff, Vidanov.  [Soundex Code V351]

Velikanov
Великанов.
This surname originates from the term velikan, meaning "giant". This term may have been given as a nickname to a large, awkward or hulking individual. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code V425]

Venediktov
Венедиктов.
This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Venedikt. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code V532]

Vetrov
Ветров. T
his surname is derived from the term veter, meaning "windy".  Note that this term also referred to a "moody" personality. The term may have been given as a nickname to someone who matched this description. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code V361]

Vinogradov
Виноградов.
This surname is derived from the term vinograd, meaning (grape) "vine". Botanical nicknames such as this were popular among the agrarian Russian peasantry. lEnglish spelling variants include: Vinogradoff.  [Soundex Code V526]

Vitsin
Вицин.
This surname is derived from the term vitsa, meaning "rod" or "switch". This term may have been given as a nickname to a tall, thin individual. lEnglish spelling variants include: Vitzin, Vitzen.  [Soundex Code V325]

Voblikov
Вобликов.
This surname originates from the Old Russian term vobly, meaning "round" or "fat". It is also suggested that the name can derive from the term vobla, meaning "sea roach". Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code V142] 

Volkov
Волков.
This surname originates from the term volk, meaning "wolf". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a wolf, perhaps a lone, solitary individual. lEnglish spelling variants include: Volkoff, Valkoff, Valkov, Wolkoff, Walkoff.  [Soundex Code V421]

Vologin
Вологин.
This surname indicates a family that originated from the town of Vologa in North Russia. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the dialect term vologa, meaning a cream-based "broth" or "sauce". Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code V425]

Voloshin
Волошин.
This patronymic surname is derived from Volosha, a diminutive form of the men's name Vladimir. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the Old Russian term volosh, meaning "Romanian" or "Walachian".   [Soundex Code V425]

Vorob'ev
Воробьев.
This surname originates from the term vorob, meaning "sparrow". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a sparrow, perhaps a swift, cheerful or singing individual. lEnglish spelling variants include: Vorobieff, Varabioff, Worobioff, Varabieff, Verabioff, Vorobow, Vorobeyov, Vorobiov, Vorobyev, Vorobiev.  [Soundex Code V611]

Voronin
Воронин.
This surname originates from the term voron ("raven") or vorona ("crow"). This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a raven or crow, perhaps a harsh-voiced or black-haired individual. lEnglish spelling variants include: Voronen, Varonan, Varonin, Veronin, Woronin, Johnson.  [Soundex Code V655]

Voronkov
Воронков. This surname originates from voronok, a diminutive form of the term voron ("raven") or vorona ("crow"). This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a raven or crow, perhaps a harsh-voiced or black-haired individual. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code V652]

Vyatkin
Вяткин. This surname indicates an ancestor who originated from Vyatka province, east of Moscow. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the term vyatka, meaning "band" or "crowd" or "wedge". Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code V325]

Y -

Yablokov
Яблоков. This surname originates from the term yabloko, meaning "apple". Food nicknames such as this were popular among the agrarian Russian peasantry and may refer to someone who grew, sold or perhaps ate apples.  lEnglish spelling variants include: Yablokoff.  [Soundex Code Y142]

Yakovenko
Яковенко.
This Ukrainian surname is derived from the men's name Yakov.  [Soundex Code Y215]

Yakovlev
Яковлев.
This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name YakovlEnglish spelling variants include: Yakovleff. [Soundex Code Y214]

Yakushev
Якушев. This
patronymic surname is derived from Yakusha, a diminutive form of the men's name Yakov. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code Y221]

Yudin
Юдин.
This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Yuda. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code Y350]

Yunkin
Юнкин.
This matronymic surname is derived from Yunka, a diminutive form of the women's names Yunia and Yunona. lEnglish spelling variants include: Unkin, Unken.  [Soundex Code Y525] 

Yurin
Юрин.
This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Yuri. lEnglish spelling variants include: Urin, Uraine, Urain, Urenn, Urane, Uren, Wren, D'Uraine.  [Soundex Code Y650]

Yurkov
Юрков.
This patronymic surname is derived from Yurka, a diminutive form of the men's name Yuri. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the term yurkii, meaning "quick". lEnglish spelling variants include: Urkoff, Urkov.  [Soundex Code Y621]

Yurov
Юров.
This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Yuri. lEnglish spelling variants include: Uroff.  [Soundex Code Y610]

Yurtaev
Юртаев.
This surname originates from the Tatar term yurta, meaning a "tent" or "hut" used by Tatar and Mongol nomads in Old Russia. Note that this term also referred to a Cossack village. It is also suggested that the name can derive from Yurtava, the Mordvin name of the fairytale spirit said to inhabit the hearth. lEnglish spelling variants include: Yourtaev, Yurtaeff, Urtaeff, Yurtioff, Urtioff.  [Soundex Code Y631]

Z -

Zabroskov
Забросков. This name is properly Zabrosky. The -ov suffix ending was added subsequent to its formation. This surname originates from the term za ("beyond") + bros ("to shed" or "to dispose of") and refers to someone who lived "beyond the garbage site". Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code Z162]

Zadachin
Задачин.
This surname originates from the Old Russian term zadacha, meaning "good luck". Note that this term also referred to a conceited person. lEnglish spelling variants include: Zadachen.  [Soundex Code Z325]

Zadorkin
Задоркин.
This surname originates from the dialect term zaderikha, meaning "querrelsome". This term may have been given as a nickname to an individual who matched this description. [Soundex Code Z362]

Zaitsev
Зайцев.
This surname originates from the term zaits, meaning "hare". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who resembled a hare in some respect, perhaps a swift, agile or timid individual. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code Z321]

Zakharov
Захаров.
Zakharov is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It is patronymic in origin and is derived from the men's name Zakhar. lEnglish spelling variants include: Zaharoff. [Soundex Code Z261]

Zakurdaev
Закурдаев. This surname originates from the dialect term zakurdai, meaning "dandy" or "fop". This term may have been given as a nickname to an individual who matched this description. [Soundex Code Z263]

Zaradonkin
Зарадонкин.
This surname originates from the term za ("beyond") + Radonka (a river in South Russia) and refers to someone who lived across the River Radonka. lEnglish spelling variants include: Zarodonkin.  [Soundex Code Z635]

Zarubin
Зарубин.
This surname originates from the term zaruba, meaning "mark", "scar" or "notch". This term may have been given as a nickname to an individual with some distinguishing mark or scar. lEnglish spelling variants include: Sarubin, Zaroobin.  [Soundex Code Z615]

Zavarikhin
Заварихин.
This surname originates from the dialect term zavarikha, meaning "gruel" or "porridge". Note that this term also referred to a  "gossip". Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.   [Soundex Code Z162]

Zhabin
Жабин.
This surname originates from the term zhaba, meaning "toad". lEnglish spelling variants include: Jabin.  [Soundex Code Z150]

Zharkikh
Жарких.
This surname originates from the term zharkii, meaning "hot", "burning" or "violent". lEnglish spelling variants include: Zharkih, Jarkeh, Jarkeih.  [Soundex Code Z620]

Zhdanov
Жданов.
This surname is derived from the term zhdanii, meaning "long awaited". This term may have been given as a nickname to a long awaited child. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code Z351]

Zheltkov
Желтков.
This surname is derived from the term zheltok, meaning "the yolk" (of an egg). Food nicknames such as this were popular among the agrarian Russian peasantry. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code Z432] 

Zheltov
Желтов.
This surname is derived from the term zhelto, meaning "yellow" or "yellowish". Note that this surname was borne by Molokan writer and martyr Feodor Zheltov (1861-1938). Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code Z431] 

Zherebtsov
Жеребцов.
This surname originates from the term zherebets, meaning "stallion" or "wren". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of an stallion. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code Z613] 

Zhidkov
Жидков.
This surname originates from the term zhidkii, meaning "watery", "liquid or "fluid". Note that this term also meant "thin" or "sparse". Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code Z321]

Zhmaev
Жмаев.
This surname is derived from the Old Russian verb zhimat' meaning "to press", "to squeeze" or "to pinch". It is also suggested that the name can derive from the term zmei, meaning "snake". lEnglish spelling variants include: Jmaev.  [Soundex Code Z510]

Zholnin
Жолнин.
This surname originates from the term zhelna, meaning "woodpecker". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a woodpecker, perhaps a persistent or tiresome individual. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code Z455]

Zhukov
Жуков.
This surname originates from the term zhuk, meaning "beetle". Note that this term also referred to a dark-haired person. lEnglish spelling variants include: Zukoff.  [Soundex Code Z210]

Zhulin
Жулин.
This surname is derived from the verb zhulit' meaning "to swindle" or "to cheat". It is also suggested that the name can derive from the verb zhulit'sya, meaning "to press close", "to shiver" or "to screw up the face". lEnglish spelling variants include: Zhoolin, Joolin, Julin, Gulin, Goolin. [Soundex Code Z450]

Zhuravlev
Журавлев.
This surname originates from the term zhuravl' meaning "crane". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a crane, perhaps a tall, thin man with long, spindly legs. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code Z614; J641]

Zhuravtsev
Журавцев.
This surname originates from Zhuravets, the name given to an inhabitant of any one of several settlements named Zhuravo, Zhuravka or Zhuravin in Old Russia. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the term zhuravets, meaning "lever". Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code Z613]

Zolnikov
Золников.
This surname originates from the term zolnik, meaning "ashman", someone who collected and sold ashes (zola). Note that this term also referred to the part of a Russian oven where ashes accumulated. lEnglish spelling variants include: Zolnikoff, Zolnekoff.  [Soundex Code Z452]

Zolotov
Золотов.
This surname originates from the term zoloto, meaning "gold". This term may have been given as a nickname to a wealthy individual, or perhaps someone with golden hair color. lEnglish spelling variants include: Zolotoff.  [Soundex Code Z431]

Zor'kin
Зорькин.
This surname originates from the term zorkii, meaning "sharp-sighted" or "keen of sight". It is also suggested that the name can derive from zor'ka, a diminutive form of the term zarya, meaning "dawn".  [Soundex Code Z625]

Zotikov
Зотиков.
This surname is patronymic in origin and is derived from the men's name Zotik. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code Z321]

Zotov
Зотов
. This patronymic surname originates from the men's name Zot. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code V310]

Zubachev
Зубачев.
This surname originates from zubach, the term for someone with big teeth (zubyi). This term was given as a nickname to someone who matched this description. lEnglish spelling variants include: Zubachoff.  [Soundex Code Z121]

Zubarov
Зубаров.
This surname originates from the dialect term zubar', meaning "big teeth" (zubyi). This term may have been given as a nickname to an individual who matched this description. [Soundex Code Z161]

Zyuzin
Зюзин.
This surname is derived from the term zyuza meaning "crybaby", "slovenly" or "drunkard". This term was given as a nickname to someone who matched this description. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code Z250]

Zvansky
Званский.
This surname indicates a family that originated from a village named Zvana, Zvanka or Zvanets, so called from the term zvanie, meaning "calling" or "summons". lEnglish spelling variants include: Zvanski, Zvanskiy, Zvanskii, Zvanskij.  [Soundex Code Z152]

Zvyagin
Звягин.
This surname derives from the term zvyaga, meaning "shouter", "whiner" or "grumbler". This term may have been given as a nickname to a child who matched this discription. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code Z125]

 


 

Notes

 

From 1904 to 1912, over 3,500 Molokans emigrated from the Caucasus region of Russia to America, settling in California, Oregon, Arizona and Mexico. At the time there were an estimated 1,200,000 Molokans in Russia. Less than 3% of all Molokans joined the migration. (For more demographics, see Molokane.org.) Therefor, as the primary focus of this glossary is Molokan surnames in America, it comprises only a fraction of all historical Molokan surnames. 

 

Note that approximately two hundred Molokan immigrants - over five per-cent of all Molokans who joined the migration - arrived through Canadian ports between 1904 and 1907 en route to the United States. For an index of known Canadian ship passenger records and border crossing records containing Molokan immigrants see Molokan Immigration Via Canada.

 

When the Molokans arrived in America, there was no standard system for transliterating Russian (Cyrillic) spellings into the English (Latin) alphabet. Furthermore, many Molokan immigrants were illiterate and had no notion that any one spelling of their surname was more correct than another. As a consequence, the English spelling of Molokan surnames became largely a matter of choice, and many spelling variants arose for each name. For example, the original Russian Bobyshev became Bobishoff, Babashoff, Babeshoff, Babishoff, Babshaw, Babshoff and Babshow in America. With this in mind, I have used the standard Russian spelling of each surname, based on the U.S. Library of Congress System, followed by English spelling variants. 

As part of the assimilation process, some Molokans deliberately changed their Russian surnames to English-sounding ones. Often the old surname was not entirely abandoned, but was reduced to one or two syllables: Bolder (Boldyrev), Cherney (Chernikov), Fettis (Fetisov), Hall (Golovachev), Kalp (Kolpakov), Kissel (Kiselev), Klubnik (Klubnikin), Matchn (Mechnev), Novak (Novikov), Ruddy (Rudometkin), Sherr (Shcherbakov), Suhovy (Sukhov), Tolmas (Tolmasov). Sometimes a genuine English surname was adopted which began with the same syllable or sounds as the old surname: D'Uraine (Yurin), Ghosoph (Gusev), Liege (Ledyaev), Preston (Prokhorov), Proffitt (Prokhorov), Seaking (Sayapin), Thomas (Tolmasov). Occasionally the new surname was based on the English language equivalent of the old surname: Andrews (Andreev), Eagles (Orlov). Often the new surname had nothing to do with the old surname: Emerald (Karyakin), Johnson (Voronin), Nichols (Stupin), Riley (Golitsin), Saber (Tikhonov). Finally, entirely new surnames were added through intermarraige: Goudy, Janke.

The Soundex is a coded last name (surname) index based on the way a name sounds rather than the way it is spelled. Surnames that sound the same, but are spelled differently, like Konovalov, Konovaloff and Conovaloff, have the same code and are filed together. The Soundex coding system was developed so that you can find a surname even though it may have been recorded under various spellings. Knowing a surname's Soundex code is useful and important, since many public archives, libraries and other institutions use Soundex-based finding aids and research tools.

 


 

Bibliography

  • Benson, M., Dictionary of Russian Personal Names (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1964).
  • Dal, V.I., Tolkovyi Slovar Zhivogo Velikorusskago Iazyka (Moscow, 1999).
  • Fedosiuk, Y.A., Russkie Familii: Populiarnii Etomologicheskii Slovar (Moscow, 1996).
  • Khalikov, A. Kh., 500 Ruski Familii c Bulgaro-Tatarski Prouzkhog (Sofia, 1993).
  • Nikonov, V.A., Slovar Russkikh Familii (Moscow: 1993).
  • Petrovskii, N.A., Slovar Russkikh Lichnikh Imen (Moscow, 1968).
  • Unbegaun, B.O., Russian Surnames (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1972).

This is a work-in-progress. If you are aware of other Molokan surnames or surname spellings in America, please contact the author Jonathan J. Kalmakoff