Doukhobor Genealogy Website  
 

Origin and Meaning of Doukhobor Surnames

 

by Jonathan J. Kalmakoff

 

A study of the origin and meaning of Doukhobor surnames reveals many clues about our family history. In some cases they indicate the first name, trade or occupation, descriptive nickname, or ethnic or geographic origin of an early ancestor. Some family names are very common and widely distributed in Russia, whereas others have uniquely Doukhobor origins. The form and spelling of many Doukhobor surnames have changed significantly over the past three centuries. This glossary contains roots and meanings of 705 Russian surnames occurring among the Doukhobors, together with the original Cyrillic spelling, transliterated English spelling, and over 2,600 English spelling variations. Note: to search for a particular surname, use the alphabetical index below or else use your browser's <find> function by pressing <Control F> and typing in the name.


 

A -

Ababkov
Абабков. This surname originates from ababok, the dialect term for a type of mushroom. Food nicknames such as this were popular among the agrarian Russian peasantry. The Ababkovs among the Doukhobors resided in the Tobol'sk-Yenisei region of Russia in the mid-19th century, and in the Amur region in the latter 19th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code A112]

Abakumov
Абакумов. This patronymic surname is derived from Abakum, a diminutive form of the men's name Avakum. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code A125]

Abrosimov
Абросимов. This patronymic surname is derived from Abrosim, a diminutive form of the men's name Amvrosy. The Abrosimovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Abrosimoff, Abrossimoff, Obrosimoff, Abrosimow, Abrosimove, Abrosimo.  [Soundex Code A162]

Afanas'ev
Афанасьев.
This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Afanasy. The Afanas'evs among the Doukhobors resided in the Tobol'sk-Yenisei region of Russia in the mid-19th century, and in the Amur region in the latter 19th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code A152]

Agafonov
Агафонов.
This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Agafon. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code A215]

Ageev
Агеев.
This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Aggei. The Ageevs among the Doukhobors resided in the province of Irkutsk, Russia in the 19th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code A210]

Akimov
Акимов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Akim. The Akimovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code A251]

Aleksandrov
Алексадров.
This surname is derived from the men's name Aleksander, or less commonly, from the women's name Aleksandra.  Among the Doukhobors, it is derived from the latter and originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Pozdnyakov family in Canada in the early 20th century, whose matriarch bore this name. It was later adopted as an official surname by some family members. lEnglish spelling variants include: Alexandroff.  [Soundex Code A425]

Alekseev
Алексеев.
This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Aleksei. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code A421] 

Alekseishin
Алексейшин. Alekseishin is derived from Alekseisha, a diminutive form of the men's name Aleksei. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Fofanov family in Elizavetpol and Kars provinces, Russia in the mid-19th century, whose patriarch bore this name. [Soundex Code A422]

Amosov
Амосов. Amosov is derived from the men's name Amos. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Samoylov family in the Dmanisi region of Georgia in the late 19th and early 20th century, whose patriarch bore this name, most likely as a nickname. [Soundex Code A520]

Andreev
Андреев. Andreev is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It is patronymic in origin and is derived from the men's name Andrei. The Andreevs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code A536]

Androsov
Андросов. This patronymic surname is derived from Andros, a diminutive form of the men's name Andron. The Androsovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Androsoff, Andrasoff, Androsow, Andersov, Androsove.  [Soundex Code A536]

Anikushin
Аникушин. Anikushin is derived from Anikusha, a diminutive form of the men's name Anikei. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Popov family in Tiflis province, Russia in the mid-19th century, whose patriarch bore this name.  [Soundex Code A522]

Anisin
Анисин. Anisin is derived from the men's name Anisii or the women's name Anisia. Among the Doukhobors, it is derived from the latter and originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Petrov family in Elizavetpol province, Russia in the mid-19th century, whose matriarch bore this name.  [Soundex Code A525]

Antyufeev
Антюфеев. This patronymic surname is derived from Antyufei, a diminutive form of the men's name Antifii. The Antyufeevs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Antufaeff, Antifave, Antifayeff, Antifaeff, Antifaev, Antifaoff, Antifeau, Antiufeeff, Antifeoff, Antifeiff, Antifeyew, Antyufeev, Antyufeyev, Antiufeyev, Antifeev, Antifeyev, Antufeev, Antufeyev, Antufeyff, Antoofeiff, Antufeaff, Antufaiff, Antufeiff, Antifeiv, Antifay.  [Soundex Code A531]

Anyutushkin
Анютушкин. This matronymic surname is derived from Anyutushka, a diminutive form of the women's name Anna. According to tradition, this surname was given by Doukhobor leader Peter "Lordly" Verigin to the offspring of his sister Anyutushka, some of whom bore the Semenov family name and some of whom bore the Podovinnikov family name. Note that this Doukhobor surname occurred only in Canada. lEnglish spelling variants include: Anootushkin, Anutushkin, Anutooshkin, Anootooshkin, Anootoshkin, Anatyshkin, Anatooskin, Anatooshkin, Anutushken.  [Soundex Code A532]

Arekhov
Арехов. Arekhov is derived from Arekha, a diminutive form of the men's name Arefei. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Verigin family in Elizavetpol and Kars provinces, Russia in the mid-19th century, whose patriarch bore this name. It was later adopted as an official surname by some family members. lEnglish spelling variants include: Arekhoff, Arekoff, Orekoff. [Soundex Code A621]

Areshin
Арешин. Areshin is derived from Aresha, a diminutive form of the men's name Arefei. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Verigin family in Elizavetpol and Kars provinces, Russia the mid-19th century, whose patriarch bore this name.  [Soundex Code A625]

Argatov
Аргатов. This surname originates from argat, a term borrowed from the Turkic language meaning "labourer", especially an agricultural, seasonal or itinerant labourer. The Argatovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Argatoff, Argotoff, Arhatoff, Argatow, Arhatow, Arhatov, Argatove.  [Soundex Code A623]

Arishchenkov
Арищенков (Арищенко). Among the Doukhobors, Arishchenkov is a Russianization of the Ukrainian surname Arishchenko. The -v suffix ending was added in the second half of the 19th century. It is derived from Arishka, a diminutive form of the women's name Arina or the men's name Arinei. The Arishchenkovs (Arishchenkos) among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Arishenkoff, Areshenkoff, Arishenkow, Areshenkow, Arishenko, Arishenkov, Arischenko, Arischenkov, Arishchenko, Arischenkoff, Arishenkove.  [Soundex Code A625]

Arkhipov
Архипов. Arkhipov is derived from the men's name Arkhip. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Savenkov family in the Dmanisi region of Georgia in the late 19th and early 20th century, whose patriarch bore this name. [Soundex Code A621]

Artemev
Артемев. This surname is derived from the men's name Artemei. There were two unrelated branches of Artemevs among the Doukhobors; one that originated from the Don in the 18th century; and another that resided in the Tobol'sk-Yenisei region of Russia in the 19th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code A635]

Aseev
Асеев. Aseev is derived from Asei, a diminutive form of the men's name Evsevei. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Popov family in Elizavetpol and Kars provinces, Russia in the 19th century, whose patriarch bore this name. It was later adopted as an official surname by some family members. [Soundex Code A210]

Astafurov
Астафуров. This surname is derived from Astafura, a diminutive form of the men's name Astafei. The Astafurovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Stafurov, Astafooroff, Ostoforoff, Astoforoff, Astofooroff, Astaforoff, Ostaforoff, Ostofuroff, Ostafooroff, Ostofooroff, Astafurow, Ostaforow, Ostofaroff.  [Soundex Code A231; O231]

Atamanenko
Атаманенко. This Ukrainian surname originates from the term ataman, meaning "leader" or "chief" of a Cossack settlement. At war the ataman was a military officer with unlimited power; in peace, an administrator who carried out decisions of the local Cossack assembly and kept order in the community. An Atamanenko family, originally of non-Doukhobor Ukrainian ancestry, joined the Doukhobor movement in Canada in the early 20th century.  [Soundex Code A355]

Atamanov
Атаманов. Atamanov is derived from the term ataman, meaning "leader" or "chief" of a Cossack settlement. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Golubov family in Elizavetpol province, Russia in the late 19th century, whose patriarch bore this name as a title or nickname. It was later adopted as an official surname by some family members in Russia.  [Soundex Code A355]

Azarov
Азаров. This surname is derived from Azar, a diminutive form of the men's name Azarii.  It is also suggested that the name can derive from the Turkic term azar, meaning "to help".  The Azarovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Kharkov-Ekaterinoslav region of Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code A261]

B -

Babaev
Бабаев. This surname is of nickname origin and derives from the Tatar term babai, meaning "grandfather". This should not be confused with the more familiar Russian term baba, meaning "grandmother" or "old woman". The Babaevs among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Tavria (Tauride) in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Babayeff, Babaeff, Babaew, Babayev.  [Soundex Code B110]

Babanin
Бабанин. This surname originates from babanya, a diminutive form of the term baba, meaning "grandmother". Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Babakaev family in Elizavetpol and Kars provinces, Russia in the mid-19th century. [Soundex Code B155]

Babakaev
Бабакаев. This surname originates from the Tatar term babakai, meaning "grandfather".  It is also suggested that the name can derive from the Russian dialect term babakoi, meaning "grandmother".  lEnglish spelling variants include: Babakaeff, Babakieff, Babakaiff, Babakioff, Babakaew, Babakayew, Babakayev, Babakave.  [Soundex Code B121]

Babiychuk
Бабийчук . This Ukrainian surname is derived from the term babiy, meaning "womanizer". This nickname has a rather indecent or obscene connotation and may have been given to a lover, philanderer or lecher. The Babiychuks among the Doukhobors originated from Kiev province, Russia in the 19th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code B122]

Baev
Баев. This surname originates from the dialect verb bait' meaning "to speak" or "to tell". Bai was the term given to a "chatterer" or "storey-teller". It is also suggested that the name can derive from the Turkic term bai, meaning "lord" or "noble". The Baevs among the Doukhobors originated from the Kharkov-Ekaterinoslav region of Russia in the 18th century.lEnglish spelling variants include: Bayoff, Baioff. Baeff, Baiff, Bayev.  [Soundex Code B100]

Balabanov
Балабанов. This surname originates from balaban, a term borrowed from the Turkic language for a species of falcon. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a falcon, perhaps a fierce, swift or keen-sighted individual. Note that this term also referred to a silly, crude or talkative person.  The Balabanovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code B415]

Balychev
Балычев. This surname originates from the term balyk, a type of salted, dried sturgeon fillet popular in Old Russia. Food nicknames such as this were popular among the agrarian Russian peasantry. The Balychevs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Voronezh, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code B421]

Barabanov
Барабанов. This surname originates from the term baraban, meaning "drum". This term may have been given as a nickname to a peasant musician who played the drum, a drum-maker or perhaps a loud, boisterous individual. According to historical records, this surname was adopted by members of the Barbin family after joining the Doukhobor movement. lEnglish spelling variants include: Barabanoff, Barbonoff, Barabonow, Barabanow, Borobanoff, Barabonoff, Barabanove, Barbano.  [Soundex Code B615]

Baranov
Баранов. T
his surname originates from the term baran, meaning "ram". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a ram, perhaps a gentle, affectionate personality. The Baranovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Kamchatka region of Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code B651]

 Barbin
Барбин. Thi
s surname originates from the dialect verb barabat' meaning "to dig", "to rummage", to "grasp" or "to appropriate".  It is also suggested that the name can derive from the Turkic term barba, meaning "broad and thick of beard".  The Barbins among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century. According to historical records, members of this family adopted the new surname Barabanov after joining the Doukhobor movement. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code B615]

Barchukov
Барчуков. This surname originates from the term barchuk, meaning a young barin (nobleman). Note that this term also referred to a lazy or idle individual. The Barchukovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code B622]

Barovsky
Баровский (Оборовский). Among the Doukhobors, this name was originally Oborovsky. The "O" was dropped in the second half of the 19th century. This surname indicates an ancestor who originated from a village named Obor, Obara or Obarov, so called from the Ukrainian term obora, meaning "cattle enclosure" or "stable". The Barovskys (Oborovskys) among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tavria, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Oborovsky, Oborovskii, Abarovsky, Abarovskii, Barosky, Baroski, Barousky, Barofsky, Barovski, Borovskii, Barowski, Barowsky, Barovskie, Borovskiy, Borovskij, Barovskii, Barovskiy, Barovskij, Barowskoff, Boroskoff.  [Soundex Code B612]

Baturin
Батурин (Батуриненко). Among the Doukhobors, this name was originally Baturinenko. The -enko suffix ending was dropped in the second half of the 19th century. It indicates an ancestor who originated from the Ukrainian town of Baturin, so called from the Turkic term batur, meaning "great hero". The Baturins (Baturinenkos) among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Baturen, Batoorin, Baturinskii, Baturinskij, Baturinskiy, Baturinski. [Soundex Code B365]

Baturinsky
Батуринский. This name is properly Baturinenko (Baturin). Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Baturinenko (Baturin) family in Tavria province, Russia in the early 19th century.  [Soundex Code B365]

Baulin
Баулин. This surname originates from the term baul (pronounced bawool) meaning "chest" or "trunk". Note that this term also referred to a "stutterer" or "stammerer". The Baulins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Voronezh, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Bawoolin, Bawolin, Baulen, Bowulin, Bowlin, Boulin, Bowolin.  [Soundex Code B450]

Bazilevsky
Базилевский. This surname is derived from Bazil, a diminutive form of the men's name Vasily. This surname was frequently given to Russian Orthodox clergy. The Bazilevskys among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code B241]

Bedinov
Бединов (Бедин). Among the Doukhobors, this name was originally Bedin. The -ov suffix ending was added in the second half of the 19th century. It originates from the term beda, meaning "woe" or "misfortune". The Bedinovs (Bedins) among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Bidinoff, Bidenoff, Bidinow, Bedenow, Bedinoff, Bedinove.  [Soundex Code B351]

Beloivanov
Белоиванов. This surname originates from the term belyi ("white") + the men's name Ivan. It refers to "Ivan with the white hair or fair complexion". Note that Ivan was a very popular and widespread name in Old Russia and frequently all the sons in a family received this name. To distinguish one Ivan from the others, they might be nicknamed White Ivan, Black Ivan, Big Ivan, Little Ivan, Middle Ivan, etc. The Beloivanovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Belavanoff, Belovanoff, Beloivanoff.  [Soundex Code B415]

Beloperstov
Белоперстов. This surname originates from the term belyi ("white") + perst ("finger") or "white-finger". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who matched this description. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code B416]

Belousov
Белоусов. This surname originates from the term belyi ("white") + us ("moustache") or "white-moustache". The resulting nickname belous (pronounced belowoos) was given to someone with a white, light or greyish moustache. The Belousovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code B421]

Belovodov
Беловодов. This surname originates from the dialect term belovod'e, meaning "free" or "unpopulated" land, and may refer to an inhabitant of such a place. The Belovodovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code B413]

Bezborodin
Безбородин. This surname originates from the term bez ("without") + boroda ("beard") and means "one without a beard" or "beardless".  Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Gubanov family in Tavria province, Russia in the early 19th century, whose patriarch bore this nickname.  [Soundex Code B216]

Bezlepkin
Безлепкин. This surname originates from the Old Russian term bezlepka, meaning "without beauty" or "ugly". This term may have been given as a nickname to a homely, plain individual. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code B241]

Bezperstov
Безперстов. This surname originates from the term bez ("without") + perst ("finger") or "missing-finger". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone missing a finger as a result of some mishap. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code B216]

Biryukov
Бирюков. This surname originates from biryuk, a term borrowed from the Turkic language meaning "wolf". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a wolf, perhaps a lone, solitary individual. The Biryukovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Berekoff, Berikoff, Berukoff, Birukoff, Barikoff, Birokoff, Burikoff, Berekow, Berikow, Berukow, Birookoff, Birukow, Biryoukoff, Bierukoff, Birekoff, Biriukov, Biriukove, Berukove.  [Soundex Code B621]

Blokhin
Блохин. This surname originates from the term blokha, meaning "flea". The Blokhins among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Tavria (Tauride) in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code B425]

Bludov
Блудов. This surname originates from the verb bludit' meaning "to play pranks", "to lead a dissolute life" or "to be lewd". This nickname has a rather indecent or obscene connotation and may have been given to a lover, philanderer or lecher. The Bludovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Kharkov-Ekaterinoslav region of Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Bludow, Bloudoff, Bludoff, Bloodoff, Bloodow, Bludove.  [Soundex Code B431]

Bogatyrev
Богатырев. This surname originates from the term bogatyr' meaning "warrior" or "great hero". The Bogatyrevs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code B236]

Bokov
Боков. This surname originates from the term bok, meaning the "side" or "flank" of one's body or torso. This term may have been given as a nickname to a lopsided or broadsided person. The Bokovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code B210]

Bokovoy
Боковой. This Ukrainian surname originates from the term bok, meaning the "side" or "flank" of one's body or torso. This term may have been given as a nickname to a lopsided or broadsided person. The Bokovoys among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Voronezh, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Bokovoi, Bokovoj, Bokoff, Bokov.  [Soundex Code B210]

Bondarev
Бондарев. This surname originates from the Ukrainian term bondar, meaning "cooper", a craftsman who manufactured wooden barrels, casks, etc. The Ukrainian root of this name (compare the Russian term for cooper - bochkar) suggests that it is either a Ukrainianized Russian or a Russianized Ukrainian surname. The Bondarevs among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Bondareff, Bonderoff, Bondoreff, Bondaroff, Bondarow, Bondariff, Bonderove, Bonderow.  [Soundex Code B536]

Borisenkov
Борисенков (Борисенко). Among the Doukhobors, Borisenkov is a Russianization of the Ukrainian surname Borisenko. The -v suffix ending was added in the 19th century. It is patronymic in origin and is derived from the men's name Boris. The Borisenkovs (Borisenkos) among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Kursk, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Barisenkoff, Borisinkoff, Borisenkoff, Borisenko, Barisenkov, Borisenkow, Barisenkow, Barisenko, Baresinkoff, Barisinkoff, Barisenkove, Borisenkove.  [Soundex Code B625]

Borisov
Борисов. Borisov is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It is patronymic in origin and is derived from the men's name Boris. lEnglish spelling variants include: Barisoff, Barieso, Bariesoff, Berisoff, Borisoff, Barisow, Bariso, Borisow, Borisove, Barisove.  [Soundex Code B621]

Borovkov
Боровков. This surname originates from borovko, a diminutive form of the term borov ("boar") meaning "little boar". It is also suggested that the name can derive from the term bor, meaning "forest". The Borovkovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code B612]

Bortsov
Борцов. This surname originates from the term borets, meaning "wrestler". It is also suggested that the name can derive from Borits, a diminutive form of the men's name Boris. lEnglish spelling variants include: Bartsoff, Bortsoff, Bartsow, Bartzoff, Bartsove, Bortsove.  [Soundex Code B632]

Bosov
Босов. This surname originates from the term bosoi, meaning "barefooted" or "barelegged". According to tradition, Ivan Bosov was an early leader of the Doukhobors in Tambov province, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code B210]

Botkin
Боткин. This surname originates from the term botka, a tall pole used by fishermen in Old Russia to strike upon the water surface and stun fish. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who manufactured or used this tool, or perhaps to a tall, lean person. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code B325]

Boyarintsev
Бояринцев. This surname originates from boyarinets, a possessive form of boyarin ("noble"), meaning someone belonging to a nobleman. The Boyarintsevs among the Doukhobors originated from the Kharkov-Ekaterinoslav region of Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code B653]

Bozhiy
Божий. This surname originates from the term bozhii, meaning "God's" or "divine". According to tradition, this name was given by Doukhobor leader Peter "Lordly" Verigin (1859-1924) to a member of the Medvedev family on account of his outstanding Doukhobor faith and beliefs. Note that this Doukhobor surname occurred only in Canada. lEnglish spelling variants include: Bojey, Bojay, Bozjhey, Bozhei, Bozhey. [Soundex Code B200]

Bryunin
Брюнин. Bryunin is a relatively uncommon surname in Russia. It originates from the Byelorussian term biryuna, meaning "brother". The Bryunins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code B655]

Brusnitsov
Брусницов. This surname originates from the term brusnika, meaning "whortleberry". The Brusnitsovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Kharkov-Ekaterinoslav region of Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code B625]

Bubnov
Бубнов. This surname originates from the term buben, meaning "tambourine". Note that this term also referred to an "impoverished", "idle" or "wasted" individual. The Bubnovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code B151]

Budaev
Будаев. This surname derives from the term buda, a mill or factory for the manufacture of potash, tar and saltpeter. Budai was the name given to a labourer at such a plant. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code B310]

Bulanov
БулановThis surname originates from bulanii, a term borrowed from the Turkic language describing the "dun" or "tan" coloring of a horse. By analogy this term may have been given as a nickname to a brown-haired person. According to historical records, this surname was adopted by members of the Bulin family after joining the Doukhobor movement. lEnglish spelling variants include: Bullanoff, Boulanoff, Boulonoff, Boolinoff, Boolanoff, Bulanoff, Boulinoff, Bolinoff, Bulanow, Boulanow, Bulnoff, Boolinow, Bollinoff, Bulanove, Bulnov.  [Soundex Code B451]

Bulgakov
Булгаков. This surname originates from the Turkic term bulgak, meaning "troublesome". The Bulgakovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code B422]

Bulin
Булин. This surname originates from the Old Russian term bulya, meaning "lump", "swelling" or "bulb". Note that this term may also be a diminutive form of tsybulya ("onion") or bulka ("bread roll").  The Bulins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. According to historical records, members of this family adopted the new surname Bulanov after joining the Doukhobor movement. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code B450]

Bul'kov
Бульков.
Bul'kov is derived from the dialect term bul'k, the perceived sound (in Russian) of water gurgling or bubbling. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Bulanov family in Tiflis province, Russia in the early 20th century. [Soundex Code B421]

Burlakov
Бурлаков. This surname originates from the term burlak, meaning "barge-hauler". The burlaki were workers in Old Russia's dangerous river shipping industry, often serving as human draught animals to pull barges and boats upstream against the current. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code B642]

Burlin
Бурлин. This
surname originates from the dialect term burla, meaning "storm".  This term may have been given as a nickname to someone whose demeanor was stormy or unstable, or perhaps to a child whose birth was marked by such natural phenomenon.  The Burlins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code B645]

Burnashev
Бурнашев. This surname originates from the dialect verb burnashit' meaning "to rage", "to brawl" or "to quarrel".  Burnash was the name given to someone who often squabbled, quarreled or brawled. The Burnashevs among the Doukhobors originated from Kavkaz province, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code B652]

Bushkov
Бушков. This surname is derived from the Old Russian term bushui, meaning "storm". This term may have been given as a nickname to a brawling or naughty child, or perhaps to a child whose birth was marked by such natural phenomenon. The Bushkovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code B221]

Butuzin
Бутузин. This surname is derived from the term butuz, meaning "chubby child" or "kiddy". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who matched this physical description, or as a term of endearment to a child or loved one.
Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Markin family in the Bogdanovka region of Georgia in the late 19th and early 20th century, whose patriarch bore this nickname.  [Soundex Code B325]

Bychkov
Бычков.
This surname originates from the term bychok, meaning a "young ox" or "bullock". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone with a lively, frisky or headstrong disposition. The Bychkovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Kostroma, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code B221]

Bykanov
Быканов. This surname originates from bykan, a diminutive form of the term byk ("bull") meaning "little bull". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone with a lively, frisky or headstrong disposition. The Bykanovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Bakanoff, Bukanoff, Bikanoff, Bikanov, Bikanove, Bykanove.  [Soundex Code B251]

Bykov
Быков.
This surname originates from the term byk meaning "bull". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone with a lively, frisky or headstrong disposition. The Bykovs among the Doukhobors resided in the province of Irkutsk, Russia in the 19th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code B210]

Bykovsky
Быковский. This surname indicates an ancestor who originated from a village named Byk, Bykovo or Bykovskiy, so called from the term byk meaning "bull". Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code B212]

Butsky
Буцкий. This surname indicates an ancestor who originated from a village named Butka, Butki or Butskoy, so called from the term butka, meaning "structure", "building" or "shelter". The Butskys among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code B320]

Ch -

Chekmarev
Чекмарев. This surname originates from chekmar, a term borrowed from the Turkic language meaning "wooden hammer", "bat", "beetle" or "club". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who manufactured or used this tool or perhaps a persistent and persevering individual. lEnglish spelling variants include: Chikmaroff, Chikmoroff, Chigmaroff, Chikmarow, Chickmaroff, Chigmarow, Chigmoroff, Chekmarov, Chekmaryov, Chekmariov, Czekmarow, Czekmarev, Chekmarove.  [Soundex Code C256]

Chentsov
Ченцов. This surname originates from the Old Russian term chenets, meaning "monk", a man who is a member of a Russian Orthodox religious order and lives in a monastery. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code C532]

Cheparov
Ч
епаров. This surname is derived from the Old Russian term chepar, meaning "messenger" or "courier".  It is also suggested that it may derive from the Tatar term chapar, meaning "soldier" or "guard",  the dialect term chipar, meaning "plane" tree or the dialect term chipor, meaning "sleet". Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Goncharov family in the Bogdanovka region of Georgia in the late 19th and early 20th century.  [Soundex Code C161]

Cherkashev
Черкашов (Черкашин). Among the Doukhobors, this name was originally Cherkashin. The -ev suffix ending was added in the second half of the 19th century. It is derived from cherkashenin, the Old Russian term for an inhabitant of the Ukrainian town of Cherkasy. The Cherkashevs (Cherkashins) among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Cherkashin, Cherkasoff, Cherkaseff, Cherkashoff, Cherkasow, Cherkashov, Cherkashyov, Cherkashiov, Cherkassoff. [Soundex Code C622]

Chernenkov
Черненков (Черненко). Among the Doukhobors, Chernenkov is a Russianization of the Ukrainian surname Chernenko. The -v suffix ending was added in the 19th century. It originates from the term chernoi, meaning "black". This nickname may describe someone with a dark and swarthy complexion, black hair, dark clothes, or perhaps a dirty or foul-tempered individual. The Chernenkovs (Chernenkos) among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. In 1970 it was found to be the thirteenth most common Doukhobor surname in Canada. lEnglish spelling variants include: Chernenkoff, Chernenkow, Chernenko, Cherenkoff, Tchernenkoff, Chernencoff, Chernencove, Chernenkove, Chernenkof, Czernenkow, Czernenkov, Chernen.  [Soundex Code C655]

Chernov
Чернов (Черной). This surname originates from the term chernoi, meaning "black". This nickname may describe someone with a dark and swarthy complexion, black hair, dark clothes, or perhaps a dirty or foul-tempered individual. There were two unrelated branches of Chernovs among the Doukhobors that originated from the Russian provinces of Tambov and Ekaterinoslav in the 18th century. The original surname of the latter branch was Chernoy, a Ukrainian surnamed Russianized by adding an -ov suffix ending in the first half of the 19th century. In 1970 it was found to be the second most common Doukhobor surname in Canada. lEnglish spelling variants include: Chernoy, Chernoi, Chernof, Chernoff, Chernow, Chernove, Cernoff, Tchernoff, Czernov, Czernow, Chirnow.  [Soundex Code C651]

Chernyshov
Чернышов. This surname originates from chernysh, a diminutive form of the term chernyi, meaning "black". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone with a dark and swarthy complexion, black hair, dark clothes, or perhaps a dirty or foul-tempered individual. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code C652]

Chireikov
Чирейков. Th
is surname originates from the dialect term chirei, meaning "boil", "furuncle" or "abscess". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone with this skin condition. The Chireikovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code C621]

Chistyakov
Чистяков. Chistyakov is derived from a spiritual connotation for the term chistyak, meaning "cleanser". Among the Doukhobors, it originated as a title or nickname for Peter Petrovich Verigin (1881-1939), leader of the Middle Party of Doukhobors in Russia from 1906-1927 and the Community Doukhobors in Canada from 1927-1939.  [Soundex Code C232]

Chivil'deev
Чивильдеев (Чувильдеев). This surname was originally written as Chuvil'deev.  It may derive from the Russian dialect term chuvil' meaning "birdie", from the Tatar term chuval' meaning "hearth" or "fireplace" or from the Tatar term chuvil, a type of woven sack used to store or transport goods. In any case, it does not derive from the more familiar Russian term chivil, meaning "sparrow", as its current spelling might suggest. The Chivil'deevs (Chuvil'deevs) among the Doukhobors originated from the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. In 1970 it was found to be the sixteenth most common Doukhobor surname in Canada. lEnglish spelling variants include: Chevelday, Childeff, Cheveldov, Cheveldave, Cheveldae, Chivildeff, Chiveldeff, Chivildeyev, Chevaldaew, Chivildeev, Chivildeyev, Cheveldeaw, Cheveldeff, Cheveldeoff, Cheveldieff, Chivildave, Cheveldaoff, Cheveldaev, Cheveldeyeff, Cheveldayeff, Chevildeau, Chiveldave, Cheveldayoff, Cheveldeaoff, Chevaldaeff, Chiveldaeff, Cheveldeiff, Cheveldaeff, Chuvildeev, Tchevildeev, Ciwildieff, Chiwildiaff, Chevildeyev, Chiwildieff, Cheweldeiff, Chivildeeff, Chevaldeyeff, Czevildeev.  [Soundex Code C143]

Chizhev
Чижев. Chizhev originates from the term chizh, meaning "siskin" or "green finch". Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Chernov family in Tiflis province, Russia in the mid-19th century.  [Soundex Code C210]

Chuchmaev
Чучмаев (Чучмай). Among the Doukhobors, Chuchmaev is a Russianization of the Ukrainian surname Chuchmai. The -ev suffix ending was added in the second half of the 19th century. It originates from the Tatar term chochamiy, meaning "lark". The Chuchmaevs (Chuchmais) among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code C251]

Chulkov
Чулков. Chulkov originates from the term chulok, meaning "stocking" or "sock". Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Kazakov family in Tiflis province, Russia in the mid-19th century, whose patriarch bore this nickname.  [Soundex Code C421]

Chursinov
Чурсинов (Чурсин). Among the Doukhobors, this name was originally Chursin. The -ov suffix ending was added in the second half of the 19th century. It is patronymic in origin and is derived from Chursa, a diminutive form of the men's name Chur. lEnglish spelling variants include: Chursinoff, Chursonoff, Chursanoff, Chursinow, Chursenoff, Chursinuff, Chersinoff, Churseneff, Chursinove, Czursinov.  [Soundex Code C625]

Chutsenko
Чуценко. This name is properly Chutsky. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Chutsky family in Tavria province, Russia in the early 19th century.  [Soundex Code C321]

 

Chutskov
Чуцков (Чуцкий). Among the Doukhobors, this name was originally Chutsky. The -ov suffix ending was added in the second half of the 19th century. It indicates an ancestor who originated from a village named Chut, Chuts or Chutski, so called from the term chutkiy, meaning "quick of ear" or "sharp of hearing". The Chutskovs (Chutskys) among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Chutskoff, Chutskow, Chutskove, Chuzkoff, Chuckoff, Chutskoer, Chudskov, Chutsenko, Chutsenkov, Czucsky, Chutsky, Chutski, Chutskii, Chutskiy, Chutskij, Chutskoy, Chutskoi.  [Soundex Code C321]

 

-D -

 

Danilov
Данилов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Danill. The Danilovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Voronezh, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code D541]

Danshin
Даншин. This patronymic surname is derived from Dansha, a diminutive form of the men's name Danill. The Danshins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Kursk, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Danshen, Danschen.  [Soundex Code D525]

Dar'in
Дарьин. Darin is derived from the men's name Darii or the women's name Daria. Among the Doukhobors, it is derived from the latter and originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Popov family in Elizavetpol and Kars provinces, Russia in the mid-19th century, whose matriarch bore this name. It was later adopted as an official surname by some family members. lEnglish spelling variants include: Daren, Dargin.  [Soundex Code D650; D625]

Davydov
Давыдов. Davydov is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It is patronymic in origin and is derived from the men's name David. The Davydovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Davidoff, Dovedoff, Davidow, Davidove, Daveidoff, Dawedow, Dowedoff.  [Soundex Code D131]

Dement'ev
Дементьев. This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Dementii. The Dementevs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code D551]

Deminov
Деминов (Демин). Among the Doukhobors, this name was originally Demin. The -ov suffix ending was added in the second half of the 19th century. It is patronymic in origin and is derived from Deoma, a diminutive form of the men's names Demian and Dementii. The Deminovs (Demins) among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Voronezh, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Demenoff, Deminoff, Demenow, Deminove.  [Soundex Code D551]

Denikarev
Деникарев. Denikarev is derived from Denika, a diminutive form of the men's name Denis. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Kireev family in Tavria province, Russia in the early 19th century. [Soundex Code D526]

Denisov
Денисов. Denisov is derived from the men's name Denis. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Chernenkov family in Tiflis province, Russia in the mid-19th century, whose patriarch bore this name. It was later adopted as an official surname by some family members. lEnglish spelling variants include: Denisoff, Dennisoff, Denisow, Dennisow, Denisove.  [Soundex Code D521]

Dergausov
Дергаусов. Dergausov is a relatively uncommon surname in Russia. It originates from the verb dergat' ("to tug or pull") + us ("moustache"). The resulting nickname dergaus (pronounced dergawoos) may have been given to someone who habitually pulled, tugged or preened his moustache. The Dergausovs among the Doukhobors originated from Kavkaz (Caucasus) province, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Dergousoff, Derhousoff, Dergowusoff, Derhusoff, Derhousow, Dergausoff, Dergousow, Dergosoff, Derhausov, Dergausove, Derhausoff, Dergousove, Derhouson. [Soundex Code D622; D621]

Dirin
Дирин. This surname originates from the term dira, meaning "hole". The Dirins among the Doukhobors originated from the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.   [Soundex Code D650]

Dmitriev
Дмитриев.
This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Dmitry. The Dmitrievs among the Doukhobors resided in the province of Irkutsk, Russia in the 19th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code D536]

Dobrov
Добров. Dobrov is derived from the term dobroi, meaning "good" or "kind". Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Bludov family in the Dmanisi region of Georgia in the late 19th and early 20th century, whose patriarch bore this nickname. [Soundex Code D161]

Dodonov
Додонов. This patronymic surname is derived from the Old Russian men's name Dodon. The Dodonovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code D351]

Dorodlev
Дородлев. This surname originates from the term dorodnyi, meaning "portly" or "stout". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who matched this physical description. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code D634]

Dorofeev
Дорофеев. This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Dorofei. The Dorofeevs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Voronezh, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Dorofaeff, Dorofeef, Dorafeyeff, Dorofeeff, Darafayeff, Dorofeeoff, Dorafeeff, Dorrofu, Dorofeyew, Darafeiff, Drofeiff, Dorofeyev, Dorofave, Dorofay.  [Soundex Code D611]

Drobyshev
Дробышев. This surname originates from the dialect term drobysh, meaning someone who takes small, fractional steps. The Drobyshevs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code D612]

Drozdov
Дроздов. This surname originates from the term drozd, meaning "blackbird" or "thrush". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a blackbird, perhaps a swift, cheerful or singing individual. The Drozdovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Drozdoff, Drazdoff, Drozdow, Drazdow, Drozdove, Drazdove.  [Soundex Code D623]

Dubasov
Дубасов. This surname originates from the verb dubasit' meaning "to cudgel" or "to give a sound thrashing to". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who was a fighter or squabbler. The Dubasovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Dubasoff, Doubosoff, Dubasow, Doubosiff, Dubosoff, Dubasove.  [Soundex Code D121]

Dubinin
Дубинин. This surname originates from the term dubina, meaning a "cudgel" or "bludgeon". Note that this term also referred to a "hard", "forceful", "obstinate" or  "foolhardy" individual. lEnglish spelling variants include: Dubenin, Doubinin, Doobenen, Doobinin, Doobenin, Dubinoff.  [Soundex Code D155]

Dukhoborov
Духоборов. This uniquely Doukhobor surname originates from the name of the sect, from dukho ("spirit") + borets ("wrestler"). It may have been adopted by a member of the Doukhobor sect or given as a nickname to a non-Doukhobor Russian who originated from an area dominated by the sect. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code D216]

Dulov
Дулов. This surname derives from the term dulo, meaning "barrel", "muzzle" or "bore". The Dulovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code D410]

Dunaev
Дунаев. This surname indicates a family that originated from the river Dunai (Danube). Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code D510]

Dutov
Дутов. This surname originates from the term dutii, meaning "haughty", "inflated" or "boastful". The Dutovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Dutoff, Dootoff, Doutoff, Dotoff, Dutow, Dutove.  [Soundex Code D310]

Dvortsov
Дворцов. This locative name derives from dvorets, meaning "palace". It may refer to an inhabitant of a palace or any one of several settlements named Dvorets in Old Russia, or any inhabitant of a dvor (household). A Dvortsov family, originally of non-Doukhobor Russian ancestry from the province of Yakutsk, Russia, immigrated to Canada with the Doukhobors after marrying into the Ryl'kov family. lEnglish spelling variants include: Dvortsoff, Dvortsow, Dwortsoff.  [Soundex Code D163]

D'yachenko
Дьяченко. This Ukrainian surname originates from the term d'yak, meaning "clerk" or "scribe", a literate individual employed to write or copy documents, letters and manuscripts. The Dyachenkos among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code D252]

D'yachkov
Дьячков. This surname originates from the term dyachok, meaning "church reader". The dyachok was an ecclesiastical official assigned to read, chant and give responses during Russian Orthodox church services. Note that this term also referred to a "clerk" or "scribe". The Dyachkovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Voronezh, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Diatchkoff, Datchkoff, Ditchkoff, Diachkoff, Diachkow, Dyatchkoff, Dechkoff, Diachkove, Diachkov, Dyachkove, D'iachkov, D'yachkov.  [Soundex Code D221]

D'yakov
Дьяков. This surname originates from the term d'yak, meaning "clerk" or "scribe", a literate individual employed to write or copy documents, letters and manuscripts. The Dyakovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Diakoff, Deacove, Diekoff, Deakove, Diakove, Deakoff, Deikoff, Diakow, Diakov, D'iakov, D'yakov.  [Soundex Code D210]

Dyatlov
Дятлов. This surname derives from the term dyatel, meaning "woodpecker". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a woodpecker, perhaps a loud or persistent individual. The Dyatlovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code D341]

Dymovsky
Дымовский (Дымовсков). This surname indicates an ancestor who originated from a village named Dymov, Dymovka or Dymovsk, so called from the term dym, meaning "smoke" as well as "log hut" and "courtyard". The Dymovskys among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. It was later modified to Dymovskov by some family members. lEnglish spelling variants include: Demosky, Dimosky, Demofsky, Demovsky, Demovski, Demovskii, Demovskij, Demovskiy, Dimovski, Dimovskii, Dimovskij, Dimovskiy, Dimowsky, Domofsky, Dimofsky, Dimofski, Dimofskie, Dimowskie, Demoskoff, Demofskoff, Demovskoff, Dimovskoff.  [Soundex Code D512]

E -

Efanov
Ефанов. This patronymic surname is derived from Efan (pronounced Yefan), a diminutive form of the men's name Epifan (pronounced Yepifan). There were two unrelated branches of Efanovs among the Doukhobors that originated from the Russian provinces of Tambov and Kavkaz (Caucasus) in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Efanoff, Effonoff, Efonoff, Efanow, Efonow, Yofonoff, Yefanov, Yefanoff, Efanove, Yefanove.  [Soundex Code E151]

Efimov
Ефимов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Efim (pronounced Yefim). There were two unrelated branches of Efimovs among the Doukhobors that originated from the province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) and the Don region of Russia. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code E151]

Efremov
Ефремов. Efremov is derived from the men's name Efrem (pronounced Yefrem). The original Efremovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century.  Note that Efremov also occurred independently as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Kireev family in Elizavetpol province, Russia, as well as a branch of the Evdokimov family in Tiflis province, Russia, in the mid-19th century, whose patriarchs bore this name.  [Soundex Code E165]

Egorov
Егоров. This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Egor (pronounced Yegor). The Egorovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Egoroff, Egorow, Egroff, Egeroff, Yegorov, Yegoroff, Ehoroff, Yehoroff.  [Soundex Code E261]

Emel'yanov
Емельянов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Emelyan. The Emelyanovs among the Doukhobors originated from Ekaterinoslav province, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code E545]

Eletsky
Елецкий (Елецков). This surname indicates an ancestor who originated from the Russian city of Elets (pronounced Yelets), so called from the term el' meaning "fir tree". Among the Doukhobors, it was later modified to Eletskov by some family members. lEnglish spelling variants include: Eletsky, Eletski, Eletskii, Eletskiy, Eletskij, Yeletsky, Yeletski, Yeletskii, Yeletskiy, Yeletskij, Yeletskov, Eletskov, Eletskow, Eletskoff, Elitzkoff, Eleskoff, Eletscoff.  [Soundex Code E432]

Erin
Ерин. Thi
s patronymic surname is derived from Era, a diminutive form of the men's names Ermil, Ermolei and Erofei. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the dialect term era, meaning a "cheat" or "mischievous person'. The Erins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code E650]

Ershkov
Ершков. This surname originates from the term ersh, meaning "ruff" fish. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a ruff. The Ershkovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code E622]

Esaulov
Есаулов. This surname is derived from esaul (pronounced yesawool), the term for a Cossack "captain". lEnglish spelling variants include: Esauloff, Evsouloff, Esovoloff, Esawoloff, Esaooloff, Isavooloff, Yesawuloff, Esovooloff, Esouloff, Esowoloff, Esooloff, Esaulow, Yesaulov, Yesauloff, Esaulove.  [Soundex Code E241; E214]

Esipov
Есипов. This patronymic surname is derived from Esip (pronounced Yesip), a diminutive form of  the men's name Osip. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code E211]

Evdokimov
Евдокимов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Evdokim (pronounced Yevdokim). There were two unrelated branches of Evdokimovs among the Doukhobors that originated from the Russian provinces of Voronezh and the Don in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Evdokimoff, Evdakimoff, Kimoff, Evdokimow, Evdokimiff, Evdekimoff, Yevdokimov, Yevdokimoff, Evdokimove.  [Soundex Code E132]

Evseev
Евсеев.
This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Evsei (pronounced Yevsei).  The Evseevs among the Doukhobors resided in the province of Irkutsk, Russia in the 19th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code E121]

Evsyukov
Евсюков. This patronymic surname is derived from Evsyuk (pronounced Yevsyuk), a diminutive form of the men's name Evsevei (pronounced Yevsevei). The Evsyukovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code E122]

F -

Fedin
Федин. Fedin is derived from Fedya, a diminutive form of the men's name Fyodor. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Kazakov family, whose patriarch bore this name, in Tiflis province, Russia in the mid-19th century, whose patriarch bore this name. [Soundex Code F350]

Fedorov
Федоров.
This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Fyodor. The Fedorovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Penza, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code F361]

Fedosov
Федосов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Fedosei. lEnglish spelling variants include: Fedosoff, Fedosow, Fedosove.  [Soundex Code F321]

Fedotov
Федотов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Fedot. The Fedotovs among the Doukhobors resided in the province of Irkutsk, Russia in the 19th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code F331]

Fetisov
Фетисов.
This patronymic surname is derived from Fetis, a diminutive form of the Old Russian men's name Feoktist. The Fetisovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code F321]

Filip'ev
Филип
ьев. This patronymic surname is derived from Filipii, a diminutive form of the men's name Filipp.  The Filip'evs among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code F411]

Filippov
Филиппов. Filippov is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It is patronymic in origin and is derived from the men's name Filipp. lEnglish spelling variants include: Filipoff, Fillipoff, Phillipoff, Philipoff, Filapoff, Filipow, Filipove, Philipove, Phillips.  [Soundex Code F411]

Finashin
Финашин. Finashin is derived from Finasha, a diminutive form of the men's name Finogen. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Kalmykov family in Elizavetpol province, Russia in the mid-19th century, whose patriarch bore this name.  [Soundex Code F525]

Finasov
Финасов. Finasov is derived from Finas, a diminutive form of the men's name Finogen. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Kalmykov family in Elizavetpol province, Russia in the mid-19th century, whose patriarch bore this name.  [Soundex Code F521]

Fofanov
Фофанов. This patronymic surname is derived from Fofan, a diminutive form of the men's name Feofan. The Fofanovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Voronezh, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Fofanoff, Fofonoff, Fofenoff, Fofonow, Fofon, Fofanow, Fofanove, Foffonoff, Fofonove, Fafanow, Hohanoff, Khokhanoff.  [Soundex Code F151]

Fominov
Фоминов (Фомин). Among the Doukhobors, this name was originally Fomin. The -ov suffix ending was added in the second half of the 19th century. It is patronymic in origin and is derived from the men's name Foma. The Fominovs (Fomins) among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Ekaterinoslav in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Famenoff, Faminoff, Fominoff, Faminow, Fomenoff, Fomonoff, Fominow, Fominove, Faminove, Feminoff, Khominov, Khominoff, Khaminoff. [Soundex Code F551; F550]

Frolov
Фролов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Frol. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Zbitnev family in Tavria province, Russia in the early 19th century, whose patriarch bore this name. [Soundex Code F641]

G/H -

Galaktionov
Галактионов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Galaktion. The Galaktionovs among the Doukhobors resided in the Tobol'sk-Yenisei region of Russia in the mid-19th century, and in the Amur region in the latter 19th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code G423]

Gankin
Ганкин. This patronymic surname is derived from Gan'ka, a diminutive form of the men's name Gavriil. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code G525]

Gavrilov
Гаврилов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Gavriil. The Gavrilovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code G64]

Gavrushin
Гаврушин.
Gavrushin is derived from Gavrusha, a diminutive form of the men's name Gavriil. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Shchukin family in Elizavetpol and Kars provinces, Russia in the mid-19th century, whose patriarch bore this name.  [Soundex Code G162]

Gerasimov
Герасимов. Gerasimov is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It is patronymic in origin and is derived from the men's name Gerasim. The Gerasimovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Voronezh, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Herasimoff, Harasemow, Herasemoff, Harasymoff, Garasimoff, Gerasimoff, Harasimoff, Gerasimow, Herasimow, Harrasomoff, Herasimov, Harasamow, Gerasimove, Herasimove, Harasmoff.  [Soundex Code G625; H625]

Gibanov
Гибанов. This surname originates from gibat' meaning "to be flexible" or "to be bendible". The term giban may have referred to a flexible or bendible person. The Gibanovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Krasnoyarsk, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code G151]

Gilev
Гилев.
This surname originates from the dialect term gil' meaning "bullfinch". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a bullfinch, perhaps a stocky, bull-headed or singing individual. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the term gilyami, meaning "prankster" or "joker". There were two unrelated branches of the Gilevs among the Doukhobors that resided in the Irkutsk and in the Tobolsk-Yenisei regions of Russia in the 19th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code G410]

Glagolev
Глаголев. This surname originates from the Church Slavonic term glagol, meaning "word" or "verb". This term has a specific religious connotation and refers to the "Word of the Gospel". lEnglish spelling variants include: Hlaholoff, Glagoloff, Glagoleff, Glegoloff, Glagolow, Hlaholow, Glagolieff, Glagolov, Hlaholov, Glagolove.  [Soundex Code G424; H441]

Glaskov
Гласков. This surname originates from glasok, a diminutive form of the term glas ("voice") meaning "little voice'. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the term glaz, meaning "eyes". lEnglish spelling variants include: Glasgoff, Glaskoff, Hlaskoff, Glaskow, Hlaskow, Glaskov, Glaskove.  [Soundex Code G421]

Glebov
Глебов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Gleb. The Glebovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Tavria (Tauride) in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Hleboff, Gleboff, Kleboff, Hlebow, Glaboff, Glebow, Hlebov, Glebove, Hlebove.  [Soundex Code G411; H411]

Glukhov
Глухов. This surname originates from the term glukhoi, meaning "deaf". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who was deaf or hard of hearing. The Glukhovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Hlookoff, Hlukoff, Hlookow, Hlukow, Holukoff, Glukhoff, Gulokoff, Glookoff, Hlukhov, Hlokoff, Glukove, Luekov.  [Soundex Code G421; H421]

Gnezdilov
Гнездилов, Гнездилин. This surname, sometimes also written as Gnezdilin,  originates from the verb gnezdit'sia meaning "to make nests". Gnezdilo was the nickname given to a "nest builder". lEnglish spelling variants include: Gnezdiloff, Gnezdeloff, Gnesdeloff, Gnusdeloff, Grusdeloff.  [Soundex Code G523]

Golenishchev
Голенищев. This surname originates from golenishche, meaning "leg of the boot".  This term may have been given as a nickname to a maker or wearer of footwear.  It is also suggested that the name can derive from the dialect verb golenit' meaning "to shout moderately" or "to be lazy".  The Golenishchevs among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century.  Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code G452]

Golishchev
Голыщев. This surname originates from golishche, a diminutive form of the term golyi, meaning "naked", "bare" or "impoverished". The Golishchevs among thиe Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century.lEnglish spelling variants include: Golischev, Golishcheff, Golischeff, Halisheff, Halishoff, Galisheff, Halishow, Galishoff, Holishchev.  [Soundex Code G421; G422]

Gololobov
Гололобов. This surname originates from the term golyi ("bare") + lob ("forehead") or "bare-forehead". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone balding or without a cap. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code G441]

Golovanov
Голованов. This surname originates from golovan, an augmentative form of the term golova ("head") meaning "big head". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone with a large head, or perhaps a clever and acute individual. The Golovanovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code G415]

Golovin
Головин. This surname originates from the term golova, meaning "head". This term may refer to the anatomy or to the leader of a household, village or military unit. The Golovins among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code G415]

Golubenko
Голубенко. This name is properly Golubov. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Golubov family in Elizavetpol province, Russia in the mid-19th century.  [Soundex Code G411]

Golubov
Голубов. Golubov is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It originates from the term golub, meaning "pigeon" or "dove". This term may have been given as a nickname to a keeper of doves, an amourous person, or someone mild and gentle as a dove. The Golubovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Kharkov-Ekaterinoslav region of Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Holuboff, Goluboff, Goloboff, Holoboff, Holobow, Golobow, Golobeff, Holubow, Hulobow, Holubov, Golubev, Globoff, Golubove, Holubove.  [Soundex Code G411; H411]

Goncharov
Гончаров. This surname originates from the term gonchar, meaning "potter", a craftsman or artisan who made and sold pots, dishes, and other earthenware vessels out of clay. The Goncharovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Hancheroff, Hancharoff, Hencheroff, Hancherow, Honcharoff, Goncharoff, Hancharow, Honcharow, Hanchoroff, Honchareff, Goncharow, Honcharov, Hancheroe, Goncharove, Honcharove, Hanch.  [Soundex Code G526; H526]

Gontarenkov
Гонтаренков (Гонтаренко). Among the Doukhobors, Gontarenkov is a Russianization of the Ukrainian surname Gontarenko. The -v suffix ending was added in the first half of the 19th century. It is derived from the term gontar', meaning "roofer", a craftsman who built, shingled and repaired roofs. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code G536]

Gontsov
Гонцов. This surname is derived from the term gonets, meaning "messenger" or "courier". Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code G532]

Gordeev
Гордеев.
This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Gordei. The Gordeevs among the Doukhobors resided in the Tobol'sk-Yenisei region of Russia in the mid-19th century, and in the Amur region in the latter 19th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code G631]

Gorelkin
Горелкин. This surname originates from the dialect term gorelka, meaning "vodka", "cornbrandy" or "spirits". This term may have been given as a nickname to a brewer or drinker of such beverages. lEnglish spelling variants include: Harelkin, Harelken, Horelken, Horelkin, Garelkin.  [Soundex Code G642; H642]

Gor'kov
Горьков, Горькин. This surname, sometimes also written as Gor'kin, originates from the term gor'kiy, meaning "bitter" or "sour". It is also suggested that the name can derive from Gor'ka, a diminutive form of several men's names including Georgii, Gorazd, Gordei, Gorislav, Grigori and Egor. The Gor'kovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Voronezh, Russia in the 18th century. In 1970 it was found to be the eighth most common Doukhobor surname in Canada. lEnglish spelling variants include: Gorkoff, Horkoff, Horokoff, Horcoff, Gorkow, Horkow, Harcoff, Harkoff, Horkov, Gor'kov, Gorkove, Horkove. [Soundex Code G621; H621]

Gorlov
Горлов. This surname originates from the term gorlo, meaning "throat". Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Bykanov family in Tavria province, Russia in the early 19th century. A second unrelated Gorlov family of Doukhobors resided in the province of Irkutsk, Russia in the 19th century. It was later adopted as an official surname by some family members. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code G641]

Gorshenin
Горшенин. This surname is derived from the Old Russian term gorshenya meaning "potter", a craftsman or artisan who made and sold pots, dishes, and other earthenware vessels out of clay. The Gorshenins among the Doukhobors originated from the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Harshenin, Harshenyin, Harshenen, Horshenin. [Soundex Code G625; H625]

Gorshkov
Горшков. Gorshkov is derived from gorshok, meaning "pot". Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Gorshenin family in Tiflis province, Russia in the mid-19th century. [Soundex Code G625]

Gremyakin
Гремякин. Gremyakin is a relatively uncommon surname in Russia. It originates from the dialectic term gremyaka, meaning "roaring", "thundering" or "rattling". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone with an exceptionally loud and thundering voice. The Gremyakins among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Hrimakin, Grimakin, Gremakin, Hremakin, Gremiakin, Hremiakin, Hremyakin.  [Soundex Code G652; H652]

Grigor'ev
Григорьев.
This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Grigory. The Grigor'evs among the Doukhobors resided in the Tobol'sk-Yenisei region of Russia in the mid-19th century, and in the Amur region in the latter 19th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code G626]

Gritchin
Гритчин. This patronymic surname is derived from Gritka, a diminutive form of the men's name Grigory. The Gritchins among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Gretchen, Gretchin, Gritchin, Grichin, Gritchen, Hrychyn.  [Soundex Code G632]

Grushkin
Грушкин. This surname originates from the term grushka, meaning "pear tree" and may refer to someone who lived near a pear tree or orchard. It is also suggested that the name can derive from Grushka, a diminutive form of the women's names Agrafena and Tigriya.  lEnglish spelling variants include: Hrooshkin, Grooshkin, Hrushkin.  [Soundex Code G622; H622]

Gubanov
Губанов. This surname originates from guban, an augmentative form of the term gub ("lips") meaning "big lips". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone with large or prominent lips, or perhaps a sullen, pouting individual. The Gubanovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Hubanoff, Goobanoff, Hoobanoff, Hoobonoff, Gubanow, Hubanow, Hubonoff, Goobanow, Hoobanow, Hubanov, Gubanove, Hubanove. [Soundex Code G151; H151]

Gudkov
Гудков. This surname originates from the term gudok, meaning "hooter". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who hooted, shouted or hollered. The Gudkovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code G321]

Gulyaev
Гуляев. This surname originates from the verb gulyat' meaning "to walk" or "to stroll". Note that this verb also means "to idle" or "to make merry". It is also suggested that the name can derive from the Turkic men's name Gulya or from Gulya, a diminutive form of several Russian men's names including Sergei, Georgii and Igor. lEnglish spelling variants include: Goolieff, Hoolaeff, Hoolioff, Gooliaff, Gulaeff, Guliov, Goolaeff, Goolayoff, Hoolieff, Goloff, Holoff, Golieff, Hoolaiff, Guliaiff, Gulioff, Hulaev, Gulaev, Gulyaev, Gulieff, Huliaev, Hoolaef, Hulyaev, Gooliaf.  [Soundex Code G410; H410]

I -

Ianov
Ианов. This patronymic surname is derived from Ian, a variation of the Old Russian men's name Ioann. The Ianovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code I510]

Ignatov
Игнатов. Ignatov is derived from the men's name Ignaty. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Kalmykov family in Elizavetpol and Kars provinces, Russia in the mid-19th century, whose patriarch bore this name.  [Soundex Code I253]

Iglov
Иглов. This surname originates from the term igla, meaning "needle". This term may have been given as a nickname to tailor or seamstress who used a needle as part of their handiwork.  Note that this term also referred to a "sharp" or "brisk" person. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code I241]

Igolkin
Иголкин. This patronymic surname is derived from Igol'ka, a diminutive form of the Old Russian men's name Ioil'. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the term igolka, meaning "needle". The Igolkins among the Doukhobors originated from Kavkaz (Caucasus) province, Russia in the 18th century, resided in the Tobol'sk-Yenisei region of Russia in the early 19th century, and in the Amur region in the latter 19th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code I242]

Il'yasov
Ильясов. This patronymic surname is derived from the Turkic men's name Il'yas. lEnglish spelling variants include: Elasoff, Elasow, Oolasoff, Olisoff, Iliasov, Il'yasov.  [Soundex Code E421]

Il'in
Ильин (Ильинов). This surname is patronymic in origin and is derived from the men's name Il'ya. The Il'ins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. It was later modified to Il'inov by some family members in the early 20th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code I450]

Isakin
Исакин (Сакин). Among the Doukhobors, this name was originally Sakin. The "I" was added in the second half of the 19th century. It is patronymic in origin and is derived from Saka, a diminutive form of the men's name Isak. The Isakins (Sakins) among the Doukhobors originated from the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Esakin, Esaken.  [Soundex Code I225; E225]

Ishchenkov
Ищенков. Ishchenkov is derived from Ishchenko, a diminutive form of the men's name Ivan. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Samoylov family in the Dmanisi region of Georgia in the late 19th and early 20th century, whose patriarch bore this name. [Soundex Code I225]

Istrebov
Истребов.
Istrebov is derived from a spiritual connotation for the term istrebitel' ("annihilator"). It is also suggested that the name can derive from the term vremya istrebleniya ("time of annihilation"). Among the Doukhobors, it originated as a title or nickname for Peter Petrovich Verigin (1904-1942), son of Doukhobor leader Peter Chistiakov Verigin.  [Soundex Code Y236]

Ivanov
Иванов. Ivanov is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It is patronymic in origin and is derived from the men's name Ivan. There were three unrelated branches of Ivanovs among the Doukhobors that originated from the Russian provinces of Tambov, Penza and Ekaterinoslav in the 18th century. Note that Ivanov also occurred independently as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Ivin family in Elizavetpol province, Russia in the mid-19th century.  [Soundex Code I151]

Ivashin
Ивашин. This patronymic surname is derived from Ivash, a diminutive form of the men's name Ivan. The Ivashins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Ewashin, Ewashen.  [Soundex Code I125]

Ivin
Ивин. This surname originates from the term iva, meaning "willow" and may refer to someone who lived near a willow tree or grove. It is also suggested that the name can derive from Iva, a diminutive form of the men's name Ivan. lEnglish spelling variants include: Ewin, Iven, Evin, Evan, Ewan, Evans.  [Soundex Code I150]

Ivliev
Ивлиев. Ivliev is derived from Ivlii, a diminutive form of the men's name Iolii. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Krygin family in Tiflis province, Russia in the mid-19th century, whose patriarch bore this name. [Soundex Code I141]

K -

Kabatov
Кабатов. Kabatov is a relatively uncommon surname in Russia. It originates from the term kabat, a type of sleeveless coat worn in Old Russia. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who wore a kabat, or perhaps a maker of such garments. lEnglish spelling variants include: Kabatoff, Cabotoff, Kabatow, Kabatove.  [Soundex Code K131]

Kablov
Каблов. This surname originates from the term kobyla, meaning "mare" (a female horse). It is also suggested that the name can derive from kobel, a male dog. The Kablovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K141]

Kachalov
Качалов.
This surname originates from kachalo or kachala, meaning the "drunk", "idler" or "squanderer". Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K241]

Kakhov
Кахов. This surname originates from the dialect verb kokhati, meaning "to love".  It is also suggested that the name can derive from the dialect term kokh, meaning "basket". The Kakhovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K210]

Kalachev
Калачев. Kalachev is derived from the term kalach, meaning "loaf" (of bread). Note that this term also referred to a "rogue", "sly" or "cunning" fellow. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Evdokimov family in Tiflis province, Russia in the mid-19th century. [Soundex Code K421]

Kalmykov
Калмыков. This surname refers to someone from the region or tribe of the Kalmyks, a Mongol people who derived their name from the Turkic word kalmyk meaning "to remain". It may also refer to a non-Kalmyk Russian with facial features like those of a Kalmyk. The Kalmykovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. This surname was borne by several Doukhobor leaders including Vasily Kalmykov (1792-1832), Ilarion Kalmykov (1816-1841), Peter Kalmykov (1836-1864) and Lukeria Kalmykova (1841-1886). lEnglish spelling variants include: Kalmakov, Kalmikov, Kolmakov, Kolmykov, Kalmokov, Calmakov, Kalmakoff, Kalmacoff, Kalmokoff, Kalmikoff, Kalmeikoff, Kolmokoff, Kalmykoff, Kolmakoff, Kolmakof, Kalmykow, Kalmakow, Kolmekow, Kolmikow, Kolmakow, Kalmikove, Kalmakove.  [Soundex Code K452]

Kanygin
Каныгин. This patronymic surname is derived from Konyga, a diminutive form of the men's name Konon. The Kanygins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Kanigan, Kanegin, Kanigin, Konegen, Kanegan, Konigan, Konigin, Konygin, Kanigen.  [Soundex Code K525]

Kapustin
Капустин. This surname originates from the term kapusta, meaning "cabbage". Note that this surname was borne by Savely Kapustin (1743-1820), leader of the Doukhobors in Tambov province, Russia from 1792-1805 and in Tavria province, Russia from 1805-1820. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K123]

Karaivanov
Караиванов. Karaivanov is derived from the Turkic term kara ("black") + the Russian men's name Ivan to form the nickname "Black Ivan". Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Goncharov family in the Dmanisi region of Georgia in the late 19th and early 20th century, whose patriarch bore this nickname.  [Soundex Code K615]

Karev
Карев. This surname originates from the term karii, meaning "brown" or "hazel" eye colouring. Note that this term was also used in some Russian dialects to refer to someone with a brown and swarthy complexion. The Karevs among the Doukhobors originated from the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Kareff, Karoff, Kariff. [Soundex Code K610]

Kasagov
Касагов. This surname originates from the Old Russian term kasag, meaning "Circassian" and refers to someone from the region or tribe of the Circassians in the North Caucasus. Note that this term also means "Cossack" in Old Russian. lEnglish spelling variants include: Kosagov, Kasogov, Kasagoff, Kasahoff, Kasohoff. [Soundex Code K221]

Kashkov
Кашков. Kashkov is derived from the Tatar term kashka, meaning "bald". Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Obed'kov family in the Dmanisi region of Georgia in the late 19th and early 20th century, whose patriarch bore this nickname. [Soundex Code K221]

Katasonov
Катасонов. This surname indicates a family that originated from the North Caucasian town of Katason. lEnglish spelling variants include: Katasonoff, Katasanoff, Katasonow, Kotusonoff, Katasonove.  [Soundex Code K325]

Katunin
Катунин. Katunin is derived from Katunya, a diminutive form of the women's name Ekaterina. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Postnikov family in Elizavetpol and Kars provinces, Russia in the mid-19th century, whose matriarch bore this name.  [Soundex Code K355]

Kazakov
Казаков. This locative name originates from kazak, meaning "Cossack". The Cossacks descend from runaway Russian and Ukrainian serfs and independent Tatar groups who established free self-governing communities on the southern steppes in the 15th century. Renowned horsemen, adventurers, frontiersmen, warriors, rebels, freebooters and bandits, the Cossacks established their own independent cultural tradition and were granted special freedoms and privileges by Russian, Polish and Turkish rulers in return for military service. The Kazakovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. In 1970 it was found to be the fourth most common Doukhobor surname in Canada. lEnglish spelling variants include: Cazakoff, Kazakoff, Kazakow, Kozakoff, Casacove, Kazakove, Kasikoff, Kasakoff.  [Soundex Code K221]

Khabarov
Хабаров. This surname originates from the Old Russian term khabar, meaning "lucky", "happy" or "profitable". This term may have been given as a nickname to a fortunate individual or to a child, by superstitious parents, as a sign of good luck. lEnglish spelling variants include: Kaboroff, Kabaroff, Khabarow, Khabarove, Kabarow, Chabaroff, Habaroff.  [Soundex Code K161]

Kharin
Харин. This patronymic surname is derived from Kharya, a diminutive form of the men's name Khariton. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.   [Soundex Code K650]

Khilimov
Хилимов. This patronymic surname is derived from Khilim, a diminutive form of the men's name Filimon. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K451]

Khimin
Химин. This patronymic surname is derived from Khima, a diminutive form of the men's names Efim and Arkhimed. The Khimins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Don region of Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K550]

Khodykin
Ходыкин. This surname originates from the term khodyka, meaning "walker", "pacer" or "foot-messenger". lEnglish spelling variants include: Hadekin, Hadikin, Khadekin, Hadiken, Hadican, Hudekin, Hadikan, Khodikin, Khadikin, Chodikin.  [Soundex Code K325; H325]

Khokhlin
Хохлин. This surname originates from the term khokhol, meaning a "forelock", "tuft" or "crest" of hair on a head. Note that khokhol was also a derogatory Russian term for a Ukrainian. The Khokhlins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov), Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Hohlen, Hohlin.  [Soundex Code K245; H450]

Kholodinin
Холодинин. This surname originates from the term kholodnii, meaning "cold". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone whose demeanor was gloomy or cold, or perhaps to a child whose birth was marked by such natural phenomenon. The Kholodinins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Kolodinin, Kalidin, Holodinin.  [Soundex Code K435]

Khramtsov
Храмцов. Th
is patronymic surname is derived from Khromets, a diminutive form of the men's names Khromei, Vakhromei and Varfolomey. It is also suggested that the name can derive from khromets, the term for a "lame" person. The Khramtsovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code E653]

Khrolov
Хролов. Khrolov is derived from Khrol, a diminutive form of the men's name Frol. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Popov family in Elizavetpol province, Russia in the mid-19th century, whose patriarch bore this name. [Soundex Code K641]

Khudyakov
Худяков. This surname originates from the term khudyak, meaning a "thin" or "poor" person. The Khudyakovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. Note that Khudyakov also occurred independently as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Tomilin family in the Bogdanovka region of Georgia in the late 19th and early 20th century.  [Soundex Code L550] lEnglish spelling variants include: Hoodikoff, Hoodicoff, Foodikoff, Fudikuf, Hoodecoff, Hudakoff, Hudakow, Hoodakow, Khudiakoff, Hudikoff, Chudyakow, Chudiakow, Chudiakoff, Hudjakoff, Hoodakoff, Khudiakov, Hoodikove, Hudikove.  [Soundex Code K321; H321]

Khvenyatkin
Хвеняткин.
Khvenyatkin is derived from Khvenyatka or Fenyatka, a diminutive form of the women's name Fedosia. Among the Doukhobors it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the D'yakov family in the Dmanisi region of Georgia in the late 19th and early 20th century, whose matriarch bore this name. [Soundex Code K153]

Kinyakin
Кинякин. This patronymic surname is derived from the Mordvinian men's name Kinyaka. lEnglish spelling variants include: Kinyakin, Kinakin, Kinaken.  [Soundex Code K525]

Kireev
Киреев. This patronymic surname is derived from Kirei, a diminutive form of the men's name Kirill. lEnglish spelling variants include: Kereiff, Keraiff, Karaioff, Kireiff, Kiraoff, Kireyev, Kureev, Kureyev.  [Soundex Code K610]

Kirilov
Кирилов. Kirilov is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It is patronymic in origin and is derived from the men's name Kirill. The Kirilovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K641]

Kiselev
Киселев.
This surname originates from the term kisel', a type of sour drink popular in Old Russia. Food nicknames such as this were popular among the agrarian Russian peasantry. The Kiselevs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Voronezh, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K241]

Kislin
Кислин. Kislin originates from the term kislii, meaning "sour", "acid" or "tart". Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Gor'kov family in Tiflis province, Russia in the mid-19th century.  [Soundex Code K245]

Kislyakov
Кисляков. This surname derives from the term kislii, meaning "sour", "acid" or "tart". It is also suggested that the name can derive from kislyai, the nickname for a "languid" or "moppish" fellow. The Kislyakovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K242]

Kitaev
Китаев. This patronymic surname is derived from the Mordvinian men's name Kitai. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K310]

Kliment'ev
Климентьев. This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Klimentii. The Kliment'evs among the Doukhobors resided in the Amur region in the 19th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K455]

Klimov
Климов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Klim. The Klimovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K451]

Klyuev
Клюев. This
surname originates from the term klyui, meaning "peck". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who pecked, either in the literal sense of striking or picking at something, or in the figurative sense of criticizing, carping or bothering persistently. The term may also refer to someone with a long aquiline nose similar to a beak (klyuv). Note that this term also meant "sleepy" in some Russian dialects. The Klyuevs among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K410]

Kobzenko
Кобз
енко. This Ukrainian surname originates from the term kobza, a type of round string instrument played in Old Russia. This term may have been given as a nickname to a peasant musician who played or manufactured the kobza. The Kobzenkos among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Tavria (Tauride) in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K125]

Kochatov
Кочатов. This surname originates from the Mordvinian men's name Kochat.  It is also suggested that the name can derive from the Old Russian term kochet, meaning "cock" (rooster). The Kochatovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K 231]

Kolbasov
Колбасов (Колбаса). Among the Doukhobors, Kolbasov is a Russianization of the Ukrainian surname Kolbasa. The -ov suffix ending was added in the first half of the 19th century. It originates from the Ukrainian term kolbasa, meaning "sausage". The Kolbasovs (Kolbasas) among the Doukhobors originated from the Kharkov-Ekaterinoslav region of Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K412]

Kolbov
Колбов. This surname originates from the dialect term kolob, meaning a "small, round loaf" (of bread). Note that this term also referred to a round, portly individual. The Kolbovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K411]

Kolesnik
Колесник. This Ukrainian surname originates from the term kolesnik, meaning "wheelwright", a craftsman who made and repaired wooden wheels and wheeled vehicles such as carts, wagons, carriages, etc. The Kolesniks among the Doukhobors originated from the Poltava-Ekaterinoslav region of Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K425]

Kolesnikov
Колесников. This surname originates from the term kolesnik, meaning "wheelwright", a craftsman who made and repaired wooden wheels and wheeled vehicles such as carts, wagons, carriages, etc. Note that this surname was borne by Selivan Kolesnikov, leader of the Doukhobors in Ekaterinoslav province, Russia from 1740-1775. lEnglish spelling variants include: Kolesnikoff, Kalesnikoff, Kalesniko, Kolesnikow, Koolesnikoff, Kalesnikow, Kolesnikove.  [Soundex Code K425]

Kolodin
Колодин. This surname derives from the term koloda, meaning "block" or "log". Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K435]

Kolosov
Колосов. Kolosov originates from the term kolos, meaning "ear" (of corn, wheat, etc). Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Popov family in Tiflis province, Russia in the mid-19th century. It was later adopted as an official surname by some family members. lEnglish spelling variants include: Kolosoff, Klasoff, Kolosow. [Soundex Code K421]

Kondrashev
Кондрашев.
This patronymic surname is derived from Kondrasha, a diminutive form of the men's name Kondratii. The Kondrashevs among the Doukhobors resided in the Amur region in the 19th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K536]

Kondrat'ev
Кондратьев. This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Kondratii.  The original Kondrat'evs among the Doukhobors hailed from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. No members of this family immigrated to Canada. However, a second family of non-Doukhobor Russian ancestry joined the Doukhobor movement in Canada after marrying into the Strukov family. lEnglish spelling variants include: Kondratoff, Kondratieff, Kondratow.  [Soundex Code K536]

Konforkin
Конфоркин. Konforkin is derived from the dialect term konforka, meaning "spirit-lamp", a lamp or burner that burns alcohol. Note that this term also refers to the "crown" of a samovar where tea is warmed. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the D'yakov family in the Dmanisi region of Georgia in the late 19th and early 20th century, whose patriarch bore this nickname. [Soundex Code K516]

Konkin
Конкин. This patronymic surname is derived from Konka, a diminutive form of the men's name Konon. Note that kon'ka is also a diminutive form of the term kon' ("horse") meaning "little horse". The Konkins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav in the 18th century. In 1970 it was found to be the third most common Doukhobor surname in Canada. lEnglish spelling variants include: Konken, Conkin.  [Soundex Code K525]

Konovalov
Коновалов. Konovalov is derived from the term konoval, meaning "horse doctor" - someone whose trade involved the care and treatment of horses for disease and injuries, birthing and gelding. Among the Doukhobors, it originated in the late 19th century as an unofficial alternate surname for a family from Tiflis province, Russia whose official surname has not been identified.  [Soundex Code K514]

Korenev
Коренев. This surname originates from the term koren' meaning "root". Note that this term also refers to an "obstinate", "severe" or "avaricious" person. The Korenevs among the Doukhobors originated from the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code K651]

Korolev
Королев. This surname originates from the term korol, meaning "king". It is unlikely that the bearers of this surname actually descend from kings since there were never any kings in Russia, only tsars. The term "king" was known to Russians mainly from fairytales and playing cards. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who was rich, worldly, happy or imperious, or it may have been given to a child, by superstitious parents, as a sign of good luck. lEnglish spelling variants include: Karaloff, Karoloff, Koroleff, Koraleff, Karaleff, Karloff, Korolov, Koroliov, Korolyov, Korolove, Korolow.  [Soundex Code K641]

Korpusov
Корпусов.
This surname originates from the Latin term korpus, meaning a "large body" or "collection" of writings. Latin-derived surnames arose almost exclusively from among the Russian Orthodox clergy. Hence, this nickname may have been given to an Orthodox monk or seminary student who was particularly well-read and studious. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K612]

Korovnikov
Коровников.
This surname derives from the term korovnik, meaning "cow dealer" or "cow breeder". The Korovnikovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K615]

Kostikov
Костиков. Kostikov is derived from Kostik, a diminutive form of the men's name Konstantin. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Salykin family in Elizavetpol and Kars provinces, Russia in the mid-19th century, whose patriarch bore this name. [Soundex Code K232]

Kostrikov
Костриков. This surname originates from the dialect term kostrika, referring to the fibrous strands of flax stem from which linen is made. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone whose occupation was the processing of flax for the making of linen, or perhaps someone who made or wore linen clothes. Note that this term also refers to "fire" as well as a "growling" or "grumbling" person.  The Kostrikovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Voronezh, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Kastrukoff, Castrucow, Castrukow, Kastrukow, Kostrukow, Kostrikoff, Kostrikow, Kostrukoff, Kastrukove, Kostrikove.  [Soundex Code K236]

Kotel'nikov
Котельников. This surname originates from the term kotel'nik, meaning "brazier", a craftsman who manufactured kettles, pots, samovars, cauldrons and other metal vessels. The Kotel'nikovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Kotelnikoff, Katelnikoff, Kotelnikow, Katelnikow, Kotel'nikov, Kotelnikove.  [Soundex Code K345]

Kotov
Котов. Kotov originates from the term kot, meaning "tom-cat". Another possible origin is from the first name Kotya, a diminutive form of Konstantin. There were two unrelated branches of Kotovs among the Doukhobors that originated from the provinces of Voronezh and Omsk in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Kotoff, Katoff. [Soundex Code K310]

Kovalev
Ковалев. This surname originates from the Ukrainian term koval, meaning "blacksmith", a craftsman who worked iron with a forge and made iron utensils, horseshoes, etc. The Ukrainian root of this name (compare the Russian term for blacksmith - kuznets) suggests that it is either a Ukrainianized Russian or a Russianized Ukrainian surname. The Kovalevs among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Tavria (Tauride) in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Kavaloff, Kavaleff, Kovaleff, Kowaleff, Kawaleff, Kafaleff, Kovalov, Kovaliov, Kovalyov, Kovalove.  [Soundex Code K141]

Kozhokin
Кожакин. This surname originates from the term kozha, meaning "leather", "hide" or "skin". It is also suggested that the name can derive from the term kozhukh, a sheepskin coat worn by peasants in Old Russia. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K225]

Kozlachkov
Козлачков. This surname originates from the term kozlochka, meaning "kid" (a young goat). This term may have been given as a nickname to someone with a lively, frisky or headstrong disposition. The Kozlachkovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K242]

Kozlov
Козлов (Козёл). This surname originates from the term kozyol, meaning "goat".  There were four unrelated branches of Kozlovs among the Doukhobors. First, Kozlov occurred as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Goncharov family of Doukhobors in Elizavetpol province, Russia in the mid-19th century. Second, male and female members of a Kozlov family, originally of Molokan ancestry, Russia, joined the Doukhobor movement in Tiflis province, Russia in the mid-19th century after marrying into Samoylov, Chernov and Kanygin families. Third, female members of a Kozlov family, originally of Russian Orthodox ancestry, joined the Doukhobor movement in Yakutsk province, Russia in the late 19th century after marrying into the Dergausov and Morozov families. Fourth, a Kozyol family, originally of Belarusian ancestry from Brest province, Russia, joined the Doukhobor movement in Canada in the early 20th century after marrying into the Terekhov family. Thereafter, they Russianized their Belarusian surname to Kozlov with the addition of an -ov suffix ending. lEnglish spelling variants include: Kozlow, Koslow, Kaslow, Kozloff.  [Soundex Code K241]

Kozodoev
Козодоев. Thi
s surname originates from the dialect term kozodoy, meaning "nightjar" (bird species). It is also suggested that the name can derive from the term koza ("goat") + doit' ("to milk") and refer to somone who "milked goats". The Kozodoevs among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K231]

Kozorev
Козорев. This
surname originates from the term kozyr, meaning "trump", a playing card of a suit that won over a card of a different suit.  This term may have been given as a nickname to a card-player. Note that this term also referred to a courageous, quick or brisk person, as well as a proud, haughty or dandy person.  The Kozorevs among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K261]

Krasnikov
Красников. This surname originates from the Old Russian term krasnyi, meaning "beautiful" or "handsome". Note that since this surname was formed, the term krasnyi has come to mean "red" in Russian and the term krasivyi is now used to decribe "beautiful" or "handsome". The Krasnikovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Krasnikoff, Krasnikow, Krasnikove.  [Soundex Code K625]

Krechetov
Кречетов. Th
is surname originates from krechet, meaning "gyrfalcon", the largest species of falcon. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a falcon, perhaps a fierce, swift or keen-sighted individual. The Krechetovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Kherson, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K623]

Krikunov
Крикунов (Крикун). Among the Doukhobors, Krikunov is a Russianization of the Ukrainian surname Krikun. The -ov suffix ending was added in the first half of the 19th century. It originates from the Ukrainian term krikun, meaning "crier", "shrieker" or "screamer". The Krikunovs (Krikuns) among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Krikunoff, Krikunow.  [Soundex Code K625]

Krivobokov
Кривобоков. T
his surname originates from the term krivoi ("crooked" or "curved") + bok ("side"), meaning "lop-sided" or "crippled". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who matched this description.  The Krivobokovs among the Doukhobors resided in the province of Irkutsk, Russia in the 19th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K611]

Krivorukov
Криворуков. This surname is derived from the term krivoi ("crooked" or "curved") + ruka ("hand" or "arm"), meaning "crooked-armed". The Krivorukovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K616]

Krivov
Кривов. This surname originates from the term krivoi, meaning "crooked" or "curved". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who somehow matched this description. The Krivovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code K 611]

Kruglov
Круглов. This surname originates from the term kruglyi, meaning "round". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone of round and portly build. According to tradition, members of this family adopted the new surname Uglov after joining the Doukhobor movement. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K624]

Krygin
Крыгин. This surname originates from the Old Russian term kryga, meaning "fishing net". Note that this term also referred to ice floating on a body of water. lEnglish spelling variants include: Kreehin, Kragin, Krigin, Krihin, Kreagin, Kreihin.  [Soundex Code K625]

Krylov
Крылов. This surname is derived from the term krylo, meaning "wing". This surname was frequently given to Russian Orthodox clergy and had a specific religious connotation of "angel wings". The Krylovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code K641]

Kryuchkov
Крючков. This surname originates from the term kryuchok, meaning "hook". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone with a crooked back or hooked nose, or perhaps a petty, captious individual. The Kryuchkovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Moskov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code K621]

Kryukov
Крюков. This surname originates from the term kryuk, meaning "hook". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone with a crooked back or hooked nose, or perhaps a petty, captious individual. lEnglish spelling variants include: Krukoff, Krukow, Kriukov.  [Soundex Code K621]

Kuchaev
Кучаев. This surname originates from the Mordvinian men's name Kuchai. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K210]

Kuchin
Кучин. This surname originates from the term kucha, meaning "heap", "pile", "mound", "crowd" or "mob". Note that this term also referred to a "pig sty" or "chicken coop". The Kuchins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Voronezh, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Koochin, Kootchin, Kouchin, Kutchin.  [Soundex Code K250]

Kudinov
Кудинов. This patronymic surname is derived from Kudin, a diminutive form of the men's name Akindin.  It is also suggested that the name can derive from the Tatar term kudai, meaning "God" or "Allah". The Kudinovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code K351]

Kudrin
Кудрин. This surname originates from the term kudra, meaning "curly haired" and was given to someone who matched this physical description. Note that this term also referred to a "trickster" or "joker". The Kudrins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Voronezh, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Koodrin, Kodrin.  [Soundex Code K365]

Kudryavtsev
Кудрявцев. T
his surname originates from the dialect term kudryavtsa, meaning "curly haired" and was given to someone who matched this physical description. The Kudryavtsevs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Saratov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K361]

Kukhtin
Кухтин. This surname originates from the term kukhta, meaning "hoarfrost". This term may have been given as a nickname to a child whose birth was marked by such natural phenomenon. The Kukhtins among the Doukhobors resided in Irkutsk province, Russia in the early 19th century, the Tobol'sk-Yenisei region of Russia in the mid-19th century, and in the Amur region in the latter 19th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code K235]

Kukhtinov
Кухтинов (Кухтин). Among the Doukhobors, this name was originally Kukhtin. The -ov suffix ending was added in the second half of the 19th century. It originates from the term kukhta, meaning "hoarfrost". This term may have been given as a nickname to a child whose birth was marked by such natural phenomenon. The Kukhtinovs (Kukhtins) among the Doukhobors originated from the Kharkov-Ekaterinoslav region of Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Koftinoff, Kooftinoff, Kuftinoff, Koftinow, Kooftinow, Kuftinow, Kaftinoff, Kuchtinoff, Kuftinove, Kuftin, Kuftinov, Kukhtinoff.  [Soundex Code K235] 

 Kukanov
Куканов.
Kukanov is derived from the dialect term kukan, a rope used by fisherman to string caught fish. Note that this term also refers to someone put in bondage. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Dement'ev family in the Dmanisi region of Georgia in the late 19th and early 20th century, whose patriarch bore this nickname. [Soundex Code K251]

Kulichkin
Куличкин. This surname derives from the dialect term kulichek, meaning "snipe". It is also suggested that the name can derive from the dialect term kulichka, a type of "sweet cake". The Kulichkins among the Doukhobors originated from the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K422]

Kunavin
Кунавин. This surname is derived from the Mordvinian men's name Kunava. The Kunavins among the Doukhobors originated from Tambov province, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K515]

Kurbatov
Курбатов. This surname originates from the Turkic term kurbat, meaning "short" or "fat". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone of short and stocky build. The Kurbatovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Tavria (Tauride) in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Koorbatoff, Kurbatoff, Kurbatow, Korbatoff, Koorbatow.  [Soundex Code K613]

Kurenev
Куренев. This patronymic surname is derived from Kuren, a diminutive form of the men's names Kirill, Kir and Kuprian. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the term kuren, meaning "peasant hut" or "Cossack village". The Kurenevs among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Tavria (Tauride) in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Kernoff, Kurnoff, Kurenoff, Kernow, Kurenow, Korenoff, Karenoff, Kareneff, Kurenov, Kureniov, Kurenyov, Kuranov, Kurenove.  [Soundex Code K651]

Kurnavin
Курнавин.
This surname originates from the dialect term kurnava, meaning "curly" or "twisted". It is also suggested that the name can derive from the verb kurnyavit' meaning "to sing quietly or muffled". The Kurnavins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K651]

Kuskov
Кусков. Th
is surname originates from the terms kusok or kuska, meaning "piece", "morsel" or "bit".  The Kuskovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century.  Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K210]

Kutyrkin
Кутыркин. Kutyrkin is derived from the dialect term kutyrka, meaning "glutton" or "greedy eater". Note that this term also referred to someone who upsets, capsizes, somersaults or falls over. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Zhuravlev family in Elizavetpol province, Russia in the mid-19th century, whose patriarch bore this nickname.  [Soundex Code K362]

Kutnyakov
Кутняков.
This surname originates from the term kutnik, meaning "cellar", "exit", "corner", "counter" and "molar" in various dialects. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the dialect term kutnya, meaning "barn", "tent", "top" or "molar". The Kutnyakovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Kootnikoff, Kootnekoff, Kootenekoff, Kutnikoff, Kootnakoff, Kutnikow, Kootnikow, Kutniakov, Kutnikove, Kutnekoff, Kutniakoff.  [Soundex Code K352]

Kuzin
Кузин. Kuzin is derived from Kuzya, a diminutive form of the men's name Kuzma. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Sherstobitov family in Tiflis province, Russia in the mid-19th century, whose patriarch bore this name. It was later adopted as an official surname by some family members. lEnglish spelling variants include: Koozin, Koozen, Kuzen.  [Soundex Code K255]

Kuzmin
Кузмин. Kuzmin is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It is patronymic in origin and is derived from the men's name Kuzma. The Kuzmins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K255]

Kuznetsov
Кузнецов. Kuznetsov is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It is derived from the term kuznets, meaning "blacksmith", a craftsman who worked iron with a forge and made iron utensils, horseshoes, etc. There were several unrelated branches of Kuznetsovs among the Doukhobors that originated from the Russian provinces of Tambov, Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) and Voronezh as well as the Don region. lEnglish spelling variants include: Kooznetsoff, Kooznitsoff, Kouznitsoff, Kusnetsoff, Kusnetzoff, Kuznetzoff, Kuznitsoff, Kuznitzoff, Kuznetsow, Kuznetsove.  [Soundex Code K253]

L -

Lakhtin
Лахтин. This patronymic surname is derived from Lakta, a diminutive form of the men's name Galaktion. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the dialect term lakhta, meaning "sea gulf" or "bay". The Lakhtins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Lactin, Lacton, Lackton, Latkin, Lachtin, Lakten, Lacktin, Laktin.  [Soundex Code L235]

Lapin
Лапин. This surname is derived from the term lapa, meaning "paw" or "pad". The Lapins among the Doukhobors originated from the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code L150]

Lapshinov
Лапшинов (Лапшин). Among the Doukhobors, this name was originally Lapshin. The -ov suffix ending was added in the second half of the 19th century. It is derived from the term lapsha, meaning "noodles". The Lapshinovs (Lapshins) among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Lapshinoff, Lopshinoff, Lapshinow, Lapshinove.  [Soundex Code L125]

Laptev
Лаптев. Laptev is derived from the term lapot' meaning "bast shoe". Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Skachkov family in the Dmanisi region of Georgia in the late 19th and early 20th century, whose patriarch bore this nickname. [Soundex Code L131]

Larin
Ларин. This patronymic surname is derived from Larya, a dimunitive form of the men's name Ilarion. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the nickname lar, meaning "chest" or "strongbox". The Larins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Laren.  [Soundex Code L650]

Lavrenchenkov
Лавренченков (Лавренченко).
Among the Doukhobors, Lavrenchenkov is a Russianization of the Ukrainian surname Lavrenchenko. The -v suffix ending was added in the second half of the 19th century. It is derived from Lavrenka, a diminutive form of the men's name Lavrentii. It was later shortened to Lavrenov by some family members. lEnglish spelling variants include: Lavrenchenko, Lavrenchenkoff, Lavrenchenkow, Lawrenchenkoff, Lavrenchinkoff, Lovrenchenkoff, Lavrench, Lovernoff, Lovernow, Lawrenow, Loverenow, Lawrenoff, Lawreno. [Soundex Code L165]

Lavrent'ev
Лаврентьев. This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Lavrentii. The Lavrent'evs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.   [Soundex Code L165]

Lavrov
Лавров. Lavrov is derived from Lavra, a diminutive form of the men's name Lavrentii. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Bondarev family in Elizavetpol and Kars provinces, Russia in the mid-19th century, whose patriarch bore this name. It was later adopted as an official surname by some family members. lEnglish spelling variants include: Loveroff, Lavroff.  [Soundex Code L161]

Lavrushin
Лаврушин. Lavrushin is derived from Lavrusha, a diminutive form of the men's name Lavrentii. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Bondarev family in Elizavetpol and Kars provinces, Russia in the mid-19th century, whose patriarch bore this name.  [Soundex Code L162]

Lazarev
Лазарев. This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Lazar. The Lazarevs among the Doukhobors originated from the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Lazareff, Lazaroff, Lazeroff, Lazarow. [Soundex Code L261]

Lazunin
Лазунин. Lazunin is derived from Lazunya, a diminutive form of the men's name Lazar. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Ryl'kov family in Tiflis province, Russia in the mid-19th century, whose patriarch bore this name.  [Soundex Code L255]

Lebedev
Лебедев. Lebedev is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It originates from the term lebed, meaning "swan". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a swan, perhaps a graceful, pure or beautiful individual. The Lebedevs among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Tavria (Tauride) in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Lebedoff, Lebidoff, Lebedeff, Lebedow, Lebedove.  [Soundex Code L131]

Leonov
Леонов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Leon. The Leonovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Tavria (Tauride) in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Leonoff, Leonow.  [Soundex Code L510]

Lepekhin
Лепехин. Th
is surname originates from the term lepekha, meaning "pancake" or "flat cake". Note that this term also referred to a "slow, portly person". The Lepekhins among the Doukhobors originated from Astrakhan province, Russia in the 18th century, resided in Tavria province, Russia in the early 19th century, and in the Amur region in the latter 19th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code L125]

Leshchenko
Лещенко. This Ukrainian surname is derived from Leshka, a diminutive form of the men's name Alexei. The Leshchenkos among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code L252]

Lesnikov
Лесников.
This surname originates from the term lesnik, meaning "forester", an inhabitant of a forest (les) or wood. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code L252]

Letyagin
Летягин. This surname originates from the verb letat' meaning "to fly" or "to take flight". Letyaga was the nickname given to one who flies or takes flight. Note that it also referred to a species of bat. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code L325]

Levanov
Леванов. Levanov is derived from Levan, a diminutive form of the men's name Lev. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Popov family in Tiflis province, Russia in the mid-19th century, whose patriarch bore this name.  [Soundex Code L151]

Levadny
Левадний. This Ukrainian surname originates from the dialect term levada, meaning "pasture" or "meadow" and may refer to someone who lived near such a place. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code L135]

Lezhebokov
Лежебоков.
This surname originates from the term lezheboka, meaning "sluggard". This term may have been given as a nickname to a lazy or idle individual who preferred to lie (lezhat' ) on his side (bok) rather than work. The Lezhebokovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Legebokoff, Legebokow, Legebow, Lezhebokoff, Ledgebokoff, Lidkobakoff, Lishabokoff, Legebekoff, Lezhebokow, Lejebokoff, Lezhebokove.  [Soundex Code L212]

Likharev
Лихарев. This surname originates from the term likhar, meaning "sorcerer". Note that this term also referred to an "ill-natured" person, a "daring fellow" and a "userer". Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code L261]

Lipatov
Липатов. Among the Doukhobors, Lipatov is derived from the dialect verb lipet' meaning "to adhere", "to stick" or "to be linked". Among non-Doukhobor Russians, this surname is commonly derived from Lipatii, a diminutive form of the men's name Ipatii. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Kalmykov family in Tiflis province, Russia in the mid-19th century, whose patriarch bore this nickname.  [Soundex Code L131]

Lobintsev
Лобин
цев. This surname originates from Lobinets, the name given to an inhabitant of any one of several settlements named Lobin or Lobni in Old Russia. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the term lobanets, meaning "high-brow". lEnglish spelling variants include: Lebentsoff, Lobintsoff, Labintsoff, Lebentseff, Lobintseff, Labinsoff, Lobinsoff, Lobintsove.  [Soundex Code L152]

Loktev
Локтев. This surname originates from the term lokot' meaning "elbow". The Loktevs among the Doukhobors originated from Tavria (Tauride) province, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code L231]

Lomazov
Ломазов.
This surname originates from the verb lomat' meaning "to break". The Lomazovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code L521]

Lukin
Лукин. This
surname originates from the term luka, meaning "onion". Nicknames derived from foodstuffs were popular among the agrarian Russian peasantry. It is also suggested that the name can derive from Luka, a diminutive form of the men's name Lukyan. The Lukins among the Doukhobors resided in the province of Irkutsk, Russia in the 19th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code L250]

Luk'yanov
Лукьянов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Lukyan. The Luk'yanovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Lukianoff, Lukanoff, Lukyanoff, Lukenoff, Loukianoff, Lukanow, Lukyanov, Loukianow, Lukanove.  [Soundex Code L251]

Lunin
Лунин. Lunin is derived from the term lun, meaning "kestrel". It is also suggested that the name can derive from Lunya, a diminutive form of the men's name Lukian. The original Lunins among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Ekaterinoslav in the 18th century. Note that Lunin also occurred independently as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Svetlichny family in Elizavetpol and Kars provinces, Russia in the mid-19th century, as well as a branch of the Kalmykov family in the Bogdanovka region of Georgia in the late 19th and early 20th century.  [Soundex Code L550]

Luponosov
Лупоносов. This surname is derived from the verb lupit' ("to peel") + nos ("nose"), meaning "peel the nose". It is also suggested that the name can derive from the term luponoska, a type of wild duck. The Luponosovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code L152]

Lyubimov
Любимов. Thi
s surname originates from the term lyubimyy, meaning "beloved" or "favorite". This term may have been given as a nickname to a beloved child by his or her parents. The Lyubimovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code L151]

M -

Makarov
Макаров. Makarov is derived from the men's name Makar. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Popov family in Elizavetpol and Kars provinces, Russia in the mid-19th century, whose patriarch bore this name. It was later adopted as an official surname by some family members. lEnglish spelling variants include: Makaroff, Makareff, Makarow.  [Soundex Code M261]

Makaseev
Макасеев (Мукосеев). This surname was originally written as Mukoseev and is derived from the term mukosei, meaning "flour-sifter" or "meal-sifter". This name was given to a baker's assistant who prepared flour for baking. The Makaseevs (Mukoseevs) among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century.lEnglish spelling variants include: Makasaeff, Mokasayeff, Makasoff, Makoseoff, Makasaieff, Makasaew, Mukoseev, Mukoseev, Makaseyeff, Makaseiff, Mokaseyeff, Makosiaeff, Mokosiaeff, Makaseyev, Makasave.  [Soundex Code M221]

Makeev
Макеев. This patronymic surname is derived from Makei, a diminutive form of the men's name Makedonii. The original Makeevs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Voronezh, Russia in the 18th century. Note that Makeev also occurred independently as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Chernov family in Tiflis and Elizavetpol provinces, Russia in the mid-19th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Makaeff, Makaoff, Makaiff, Makaiv, Makeef, Makeif, Makeiff, Makeiv, Makeyff, Mackave, McKaeff, Makayeff, Makioff, Makieff, Makayoff, Makeyeff, Makeoff, Makiev, Makeyev, Makave, McKave.  [Soundex Code M210]

Makhonin
Махонин.
This surname is derived from the term makhonya, meaning "the signaler on a vessel".  Note that this term also referred to a "ingenuous", "gloomy", "slight", "bad" or "unkempt" person in various dialects. There were two unrelated branches of Makhonins among the Doukhobors that originated from the province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) and the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Makonen, Mahonin, Mahonen, Makonin.  [Soundex Code M255]

Makhortov
Махортов (Мухортов).
This surname was originally written as Mukhortov and is derived from mukhort, a term borrowed from the Turkic language describing the "bay" or "chestnut" coloring of a horse. By analogy this term may have been given as a nickname to a brown-haired person. Note that this term also referred to a "thin", "weak" or "sickly" individual. The Makhortovs (Mukhortovs) among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Voronezh, Russia in the 18th century. In 1970 it was found to be the fifteenth most common Doukhobor surname in Canada. lEnglish spelling variants include: Makortoff, Mahortoff, McKortoff, Muchortov, Makortow, Makortaff, Makhortow, Macortoff, Makorto, Mukhortov, Makhortove, Mukhortove.  [Soundex Code M263; M631]

Malakhov
Малахов.
This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Malakhei. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the term malakhai, meaning "fur cap". The Malakhovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Malakoff, Malikoff, Malekow, Malekoff, Malokoff, Malahoff, Malakow, Malakoe, Molachoff, Malakhow, Malakove.  [Soundex Code M421]

Malen'kov
Маленьков. Thi
s surname originates from the term malen'kii, meaning "little" or "small". This nickname was often given to the smallest or youngest child in a family. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code M452]

Malikov
Маликов.
This surname originates from malik, a diminutive form of the term malo, meaning "small". This nickname was often given to the smallest or youngest child in a family. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the Turko-Arabic term malik, meaning "lord" or "noble". The Malikovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Malakoff, Malikoff, Malekow, Malekoff, Malahoff, Malakow, Malikove.  [Soundex Code M421]

Malov
Малов.
This surname originates from the term malo, meaning "small". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone small and slight of stature, or perhaps to the youngest child in a family. The Malovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Maloff, Malloff, Malow, Malove, Mallow, Meloff, Mallo.  [Soundex Code M410]

Mamonov
Мамонов. Thi
s surname originates from the Turkic term mamon, meaning "modest" or "mild". It is also suggested that the name can derive from the Russian dialect term mamon, meaning "belly" or "stomach". The Mamonovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Saratov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code M551]

Markin
Маркин.
This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Mark. The Markins among the Doukhobors originated from the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. In 1970 it was found to be the sixth most common Doukhobor surname in Canada. lEnglish spelling variants include: Marken.  [Soundex Code M625]

Markov
Марков.
Markov is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It is patronymic in origin and is derived from the men's name Mark. There were several unrelated branches of Markovs among the Doukhobors that originated from the Kharkov-Ekaterinoslav, Penza and Don regions of Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Markoff, Marcoff, Markow.  [Soundex Code M621]

Martinov
Мартинов.
Martinov is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It is patronymic in origin and is derived from the men's name Martin. There were two unrelated branches of Martinovs among the Doukhobors that originated from the province of Tambov and the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code M635]

Mashkin
Машкин, Машков.
This matronymic surname, sometimes also written as Mashkov, is derived from Mashka, a diminutive form of the women's name Maria. The Mashkins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code M225]

Maslov
Маслов.
This surname originates from the term maslo, meaning "butter" or "oil". Nicknames derived from foodstuffs were popular among the agrarian Russian peasantry. lEnglish spelling variants include: Masloff, Masslow, Maslow, Maslove.  [Soundex Code M241]

Matrosov
Матросов.
This surname is derived from the term matros, meaning "sailor", a member of a ship's crew or a serviceman in the navy. The Matrosovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Tavria (Tauride) in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Matrosoff, Matrosow, Matrosove.  [Soundex Code M362]

Matveev
Матвеев.
Matveev is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It is patronymic in origin and is derived from the men's name Matvei. The Matveevs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Penza, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code M311]

Matveyenko
Матвеенко.
This Ukrainian surname is derived from the men's name Matvei. A Matveyenko family, originally of Stundist ancestry from the province of Kharkov, Russia, joined the Doukhobor movement in Canada after marrying into the Lebedev family. lEnglish spelling variants include: Matvenko, Matveenko.  [Soundex Code M315]

Medvedev
Медведев.
This surname originates from the term medved, meaning "bear". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a bear, perhaps a great, awkward, hulking, powerful individual. There were two unrelated branches of Medvedevs among the Doukhobors that originated from the Russian provinces of Ekaterinoslav and Kavkaz (Caucasus) in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Medvedeyeff, Medvedeff, Medvedoff, Medvedove, Medwedeff. [Soundex Code M313]

Men'shagin
Меньшагин. This surname originates from the dialect term men'shaga, meaning "younger son" or "younger brother". This term may have been given to the youngest male child in a family. The Men'shagins among the Doukhobors resided in Irkutsk province, Russia in the early 19th century, the Tobol'sk-Yenisei region of Russia in the mid-19th century, and in the Amur region in the latter 19th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code M522]

Menshov
Меншов.
This surname originates from the term menshoi, meaning "youngest". This term may have been given as a nickname to the youngest child in a family. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code M521]

Menyakin
Менякин. This patronymic surname is derived from the verb menyat'sya, meaning "to change" or "to exchange". Menyaka was the term given to someone who was an "exchanger", "barterer" or "swapper" by nature. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code M525]

Merekin
Мерекин.
This surname is derived from the dialect verb merekat'  meaning "to guess" or "to comprehend". It is also suggested that the name can derive from merek, the name of the malicious fairytale spirit that dirties and spoils things. The Merekins among the Doukhobors originated from the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code M625]

Merkulov
Меркулов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Merkul. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code M624]

Mezentsev
Мезенцев. This surname originates from Mezenets, the name given to an inhabitant of the shores of the Mezen River which flows into the White Sea. It may also refer to an inhabitant of any one of several settlements named Mezen in Old Russia. The Mezentsevs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code M253]

Mikhailov
Михаилов.
Mikhailov is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It originates from the men's name Mikhailo. The Mikhailovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Tavria (Tauride) in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code M241]

Mikhin
Михин.
This patronymic surname is derived from Mikha, a diminutive form of the men's name Mikhailo. The Mikhins among the Doukhobors originated from the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code M250]

Mikin
Микин.
Mikin is derived from Mika, a diminutive form of the men's name Mikhailo. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Mitin family in Elizavetpol and Kars provinces, Russia in the late 19th century. It was later adopted as an official surname by some family members. lEnglish spelling variants include: Meekin, Meakin, Meaken.  [Soundex Code M250]

Mikishin
Микишин. Mikishin is derived from Mikisha, a diminutive form of the men's name Nikita or Nikifor. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Popov family in Elizavetpol and Kars provinces, Russia in the mid-19th century, whose patriarch bore this name.  [Soundex Code M225]

Mikitin
Микитин
. Mikitin is derived from Mikita, a variant form of the men's name Nikita. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Markin family in the Bogdanovka region of Georgia in the late 19th and early 20th century, whose patriarch bore this name. [Soundex Code M235]

Mikolenkov
Миколенков. Among the Doukhobors, this surname is derived from from Mikolenka, a diminutive form of the men's name Nikolai, and it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Chernov family in Tiflis and Elizavetpol province, Russia in the mid-19th century, whose patriarch bore this name. Among non-Doukhobor Russians, this surname may also be a Russianization of the Ukrainian surname Mikolenko, derived from the men's name Nikolai.  [Soundex Code M245]

Mikulin
Микулин. This patronymic surname is derived from Mikula, a diminutive form of the men's name Nikolai. The Mikulins among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code M245]

Milovanov
Милованов. This surname originates from milovan, the dialect term for a "merciful", "forgiving" or "loving" person.  The Milovanovs among the Doukhobors resided in the Tobol'sk-Yenisei region of Russia in the early 19th century, and in the Amur region in the latter 19th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code M415]

Minakov
Минаков. This patronymic surname is derived from Minak, a diminutive form of the men's name Mina. A Minakov family, originally of Molokan ancestry, joined the Doukhobor movement in Russia in the early 20th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code M521]

Mironov
Миронов.
This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Miron. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Miroshnikov family in Tiflis province, Russia in the mid-19th century. [Soundex Code M651]

Miroshin
Мирошин. Thi
s patronymic surname is derived from Mirosha, a diminutive form of the men's name Miron. The Miroshins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Poltava, Russia in the 18th century. According to historical records, members of this family adopted the new surname Miroshnikov after joining the Doukhobor movement. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code M625]

Miroshnikov
Мирошников.
This surname originates from the Ukrainian term miroshnik, meaning "miller" - someone who owned or operated a mill for grinding grain into flour or meal. According to historical records, this surname was adopted by members of the Miroshin family after joining the Doukhobor movement. lEnglish spelling variants include: Meroshnekoff, Meroshnikoff, Miroshnikow, Mirosnikov, Miroshnikoff, Miroshnikove.  [Soundex Code M625]

Mishikov
Мишиков. Mishikov is derived from Mishik, a diminutive form of the men's name Mikhail. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Gubanov family in the Bogdanovka region of Georgia in the late 19th and early 20th century, whose patriarch bore this name. [Soundex Code M221]

Mitin
Митин.
This patronymic surname is derived from Mitya, a diminutive form of the men's name Dmitry. The original Mitins among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Tavria (Tauride) in the 18th century. Note that Mitin also occurred independently as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Kalmykov family in Elizavetpol province, Russia in the mid-19th century, whose patriarch bore this name. lEnglish spelling variants include: Miten, Mytyn, Mytin, Meetin.  [Soundex Code M350]

Mitrov
Митров.
Mitrov is derived from Mitro, a diminutive form of the men's name Dmitry. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Kalmykov family in Elizavetpol province, Russia in the mid-19th century, whose patriarch bore this name.  [Soundex Code M361]

Mizginov
Мизгинов. Thi
s surname originates from the dialect verb mizgat' meaning "to cry", "to whine" or "to weep". It is also suggested that the name can derive from the dialect verb mizgatisya, meaning "to woo", "to court" or "to make love". The Mizginovs among the Doukhobors resided in Irkutsk province, Russia in the 19th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code M251]

Mochalov
Мочалов.
This surname originates from the term mochalo, meaning "bast". Peasants in Old Russia used bast - the inner bark of certain trees - for making rope, matting, netting, etc. The Mochalovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Kavkaz (Caucasus)  in the 18th century, resided in the Tobol'sk-Yenisei region of Russia in the early 19th century, and in the Amur region in the latter 19th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code M241]

Mokronosov
Мокроносов.
This surname derives from the term mokrii ("wet") + nos ("nose") or "wet-nosed". This nickname may have been given to a child with a cold or running nose. A Mokronosov family, originally of non-Doukhobor Russian ancestry from the province of Perm, Russia, immigrated to Canada with the Doukhobors after marrying into the Salykin family. The name was later shortened to Mokronov by some family members. lEnglish spelling variants include: Makronosoff, Mokronosoff, Makronoff, Mokronoff, Mokronosove.  [Soundex Code M265]

Molchanov
Молчанов. This surname originates from the term molchan, meaning a "silent", "taciturn" or "reserved" individual. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code M425]

Mordovin
Мордовин.
This surname originates from the term mordva, and refers to someone from the region or tribe of the Mordvin people. The Mordovins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code M631]

Morgunov
Моргунов. This surname originates from the verb morgat' meaning "to wink". Morgun was the nickname given to someone who winks. The Morgunovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code M625]

Morozov
Морозов. Morozov is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It originates from the term moroz, meaning "frost" or "cold". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone whose demeanor was gloomy or cold, or perhaps to a child whose birth was marked by such natural phenomenon. lEnglish spelling variants include: Morosoff, Morozoff, Marozoff, Moroso, Moraso, Morozow, Morosow, Morosof, Morsoff, Morozove. [Soundex Code M621]

Mudrov
Мудров.
This surname originates from the term mudrii, meaning "wise", "sage", "intelligent", "prudent" and "clever". Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code M361]

Mukovnin
Муковнин (Муковников).
This surname originates from the dialect term makovna, meaning "poppy seed". Among the Doukhobors, it was later modified to Mukovnikov, from the dialect term makovnik, meaning "poppy seed cake". Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code M215]

Mzhachev
Мжачев.
This surname originates from the dialect verb mzhat', meaning "to doze", "to be sleepy" or "to be somnolent".  The term mzhach may have been given as a nickname to someone who exhibited this characteristic. The Mzhachevs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code M221]

Mzhel'sky
Мжел
ьский. This surname indicates an ancestor who originated from the princely estate of Mzhel'sk in Old Russia, so called from the men's name Muzhilo. The original Mzhelskys among the Doukhobors hailed from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. According to tradition, the name was later adopted by a member of the Makeev family after the original male line of the Mzhelskys became extinct. Therefor the present day Mzhelskys among the Doukhobors are actually a branch of the Makeevs. lEnglish spelling variants include: Mojelsky, Mojelski, Mujelsky, Moojalsky, Moojelsky, Mzhelski, Mzhelskii, Mzhelskiy, Mzhelskij, Muzhilsky, Muzhilski, Muzhilskii, Muzhilskij, Muzhilskiy, Mojelskoff, Moojelskoff.  [Soundex Code M242]

N -

Nadein
Надеин. This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Nadei. The Nadeins among the Doukhobors originated from the Kharkov-Ekaterinoslav region of Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Nadane, Nadain.  [Soundex Code N350]

Nagornov
Нагорнов (Нагорн
ий). Among the Doukhobors, Nagornov is a Russianization of the Ukrainian surname Nagorny. The -ov suffix ending was added in the second half of the 19th century. It originates from the term na ("up" or "on") + gor ("mountain") and refers to a "highlander" or "hill-dweller". lEnglish spelling variants include: Nagornoy, Nagornoff, Nahornoff, Nagornow, Nahornow, Nahornov, Nahornove. [Soundex Code N265]

Naidenov
Найденов. This surname originates from the term naidenishei, meaning "foundling". The Naidenovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Kharkov-Ekaterinoslav region of Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code N351]

Nazarov
Назаров. Nazarov is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It is patronymic in origin and is derived from the men's name Nazar. There were two unrelated branches of Nazarovs among the Doukhobors that originated from the province of Tambov and the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Nazaroff, Nasaroff, Nazarow, Nazarove, Nazar.  [Soundex Code N261]

Nechvolodov
Нечволодов.
This patronymic surname is derived from the Old Russian men's name Nechvolod. lEnglish spelling variants include: Nechevolodoff, Nichvolodoff, Nichwolodoff, Nechvalodoff, Nichvalodoff, Nechwalodoff, Nichvolodov, Nichevalodoff, Nicholodoff, Nechivalodoff, Nitchvolodoff, Nechvolodoff, Nichevolodoff, Nichvolodow, Nichvoldow, Nechvolodove.  [Soundex Code N214]

Nefedov
Нефедов.
This patronymic surname is derived from Nefed, a diminutive form of the men's name Mefodii. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code N131]

Negreev
Негреев.
This surname originates from the term ne ("not") + the verb gret' ("to warm") meaning "one who does not give out warmth". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone whose demeanor was gloomy or cold. The Negreevs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Negraeff, Negrave, Negrieff, Negreff, Negraff, Negreiff, Negreeff, Negreoff, Negreyev, Nigreoff, Nehraeff, Nechreiff, Negraiff, Negreyeff.  [Soundex Code N261]

Nemanikhin
Неманихин.
Nemanikhin is a rare surname in Russia. It originates from the term ne ("not") + manikha ("tempter" or "deceiver") meaning "one who does not deceive". This term may have been given as a nickname to an honest, straightforward, upright, trustworthy person. The Nemanikhins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Kursk, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Nemanikin, Nimanikin, Nemanicken, Niminikin, Nemonechen, Nimonichin, Nimanichan, Neimanichon, Nimanichin, Nymanychyn, Nemanishen, Nemanikhen, Niminiken, Neimanikhen, Nemaniken, Nemanischen, Nemaneshen, Neimanikhen.  [Soundex Code N552]

Nemakhov
Немахов.
This surname is derived from the term nemak, meaning "mute". It is also suggested that the name can derive from the term nemaka, meaning "little" or "few". Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code N521]

Neronov
Неронов. This patronymic surname is derived from Neron, a diminutive form of the men's name Miron. The Neronovs among the Doukhobors resided in the province of Irkutsk, Russia in the 19th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code N651]

Nestorov
Несторов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Nester. A Nestorov family, originally of Baptist ancestry from the province of Kiev, Russia, joined the Doukhobor movement in Canada after marrying into the Konkin family. lEnglish spelling variants include: Nesteroff, Nestiroff.  [Soundex Code N236]

Nikiforov
Никифоров. T
his patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Nikifor. The Nikiforovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Penza, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K216]

Nikishev
Никишев. This surname originates from Nikisha, a diminutive form of the men's name Nikita or Nikifor. The Nikishevs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Penza, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code M221]

Nikitin
Никитин. This surname originates from the men's name Nikita. There were two unrelated branches of Nikitins among the Doukhobors that originated from the Tambov-Penza region and the Don region of Russia. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. Note that Nikitin also occurred independently in the 19th century as an unofficial alternate surname for a Doukhobor family from Tiflis province, Russia whose official surname has not been identified. [Soundex Code N235]

Nikolenkov
Николенков. Among the Doukhobors, this surname is derived from from Nikolenka, a diminutive form of the men's name Nikolai, and it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Chernov family in Tiflis and Elizavetpol province, Russia in the mid-19th century, whose patriarch bore this name. Among non-Doukhobor Russians, this surname may also be a Russianization of the Ukrainian surname Nikolenko, derived from the men's name Nikolai.  [Soundex Code N245]

Nosov
Носов, Носков.
This surname, sometimes also written as Noskov, originates from the term nos, meaning "nose". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone with a large or prominent nose. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code N210]

Novikov
Новиков.
Novikov is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It originates from the term novii, meaning "new". This term may have been given as a nickname to any amateur or newcomer. It is also suggested that the name can derive from novik, a term given to young soldiers and recruits meaning "novice". Note that Novikov occurred among the Doukhobors as an official surname, and independently, as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Popov family in Tiflis province, Russia in the late 19th century. [Soundex Code N121]

Novokshonov
Новокшонов.
This surname originates from the term novokreschony, meaning "newly-baptised" or "newly-converted". This nickname was given to those who accepted the Russian Orthodox faith, especially non-Christians and non-Russians such as Turks, Tatars, Mordvins, etc. From the 16th to 18th century, novokreschony in Russia were granted special incentives and privileges for converting, such as tax and military service exemptions, which distinguished them from the ordinary peasantry. lEnglish spelling variants include: Novokshonoff, Nevokshoneff, Nevokshonoff, Nevacshonoff, Novokshoneff, Novakshonoff, Nevakshonoff, Novoshonoff, Nowakshanoff, Niwakshonoff, Navakshonoff, Novokshonow, Novokshonove, Nevok.  [Soundex Code N125]

Novosadov
Новосадов.
This surname is derived from the term novo ("new") + sad ("garden") and may refer to someone who planted or lived near a new garden. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code N123]

Novosil'tsev
Новосильцев.
This surname originates from the term novoselets, meaning "new settler" and refers to a newcomer to a locality. The Novosil'tsevs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code N124]

Nozhkin
Ножкин.
This surname originates from the term nozhki, meaning "small feet" or "small legs", and was given to someone who matched this physical description. A Nozhkin family, originally of non-Doukhobor Russian ancestry, immigrated to Canada with the Doukhobors after marrying into the Chernenkov family. lEnglish spelling variants include: Noshkin. [Soundex Code N225]

O -

Obedkov
Обедков.
This surname is derived from the term obedki, meaning "meal leftovers" or "scraps". The Obedkovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Abetkoff, Obiatkoff, Obiedkoff, Obietkoff, Obedkoff, Abietkoff, Obetkoff, Obetkow, Abedkoff, Obetkov, Obet'kov, Obetkove, Abetkove.  [Soundex Code O132; A132]

Obolentsev
Оболен
цев. This surname originates from Obolenets, the name given to an inhabitant of the Russian city of Obolensk on the Oka river. The Obolentsevs among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code O145]

Okovantsev
Окованцев. This surname originates from the term okovanets, meaning "one who is fettered" or "one who is shackled'. The term may have been given as a nickname to a prisoner. The Okovantsevs among the Doukhobors resided in the province of Irkutsk, Russia in the 19th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code O215]

Ordikov
Ордиков.
This patronymic surname is derived from the Turkic men's name Ordik. The Ordikovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Orenburg, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code O632]

Orekhov
Орехов. Thi
s surname originates from the term orekh, meaning "nut". Nicknames derived from foodstuffs were popular among the agrarian Russian peasantry. It is also suggested that the name can derive from Orekha, a diminutive form of the men's name Arefy. The Orekhovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Moskov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code O621]

Osipov
Осипов.
This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Osip. The Osipovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code O211]

Oslopov
Ослопов.
This surname originates from the term oslop, a large bludgeon or cudgel with iron spikes. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who manufactured or used this weapon, or perhaps a hard, forceful individual. The Oslopovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code O241]

Ostrikov
Остриков.
This surname originates from the term ostrik, meaning "sharp". This term may have been given as a nickname to a sharp or witty person. The Ostrikovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Ostrikoff, Ostrekoff, Ostrikow, Ostrikove.  [Soundex Code O236]

Ovchinnikov
Овчинников. This
surname originates from the term ovchinnik, which refers to a furrier who manufactured sheepskin (ovchina) for garments and accessories. The Ovchinnikovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Voronezh, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code O125]

Ozerov
Озеров.
This surname originates from the term ozer, meaning "lake" and refers to someone who lived near a lake. lEnglish spelling variants include: Ozeroff, Ozoroff, Azeroff, Oseroff, Ozerow, Ozerove.  [Soundex Code O261]

P -

Panferkov
Панферков. Panferkov is derived from Panferka, a diminutive form of the men's name Parfen. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Parfenkov family in Elizavetpol province, Russia in the mid-19th century.  [Soundex Code P516]

Panferov
Панферов. Panferov is derived from Panfer, a diminutive form of the men's name Parfen. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Antyufeev family in Tiflis province, Russia in the late 19th century.  [Soundex Code P516]

Panin
Панин. This patronymic surname is derived from Panya, a diminutive form of several men's names including Pavel, Panteleimon and Polien. There were three unrelated branches of Panins among the Doukhobors that originated from the provinces of Tambov, Voronezh and the Don region of Russia. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P550]

Pankov
Панков. This patronymic surname is derived from Panko, a diminutive form of the men's name Pavel. The Pankovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Pankoff, Pankow, Panko, Pankove.  [Soundex Code P521]

Pankratov
Панкратов
. This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Pankrat. The Pankratovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Penza, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P526]

Parakhin
Парахин. This patronymic surname is derived from Parakha, a diminutive form of the men's name Paramon. The Parakhins among the Doukhobors originated from Kavkaz (Caucasus) province, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Paraheen, Parkin, Parakin, Parahin.  [Soundex Code P625]

Paramonov
Парамонов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Paramon. The Paramonovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code P655]

Parazikhin
Паразихин.
This surname originates from the verb porazit' meaning "to astonish". Porazikha was the nickname given to "one who astonishes". The Parazikhins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Voronezh, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P622]

Parfenkov
Парфенков (Парфёнов). Among the Doukhobor, this name was originally Parfenov. The "k" was added in the first half of the 19th century. It is patronymic in origin and is derived from the men's name Parfen. The Parfenkovs (Parfenovs) among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among non-Doukhobor Russians, this surname may also be a Russianization of the Ukrainian surname Parfenko, which is derived from the men's name Parfen. lEnglish spelling variants include: Parfenov, Parfionov, Parfyonov, Parfionkov, Parfyonkov, Parfenkoff, Parfenkow, Parfenkove.  [Soundex Code P615]

Parkin
Паркин.
This patronymic surname is derived from Parka, a diminutive form of the men's name Paramon. lEnglish spelling variants include: Paraheen, Parkin, Parakin, Parahin.  [Soundex Code P625]

Parshin
Паршин. This patronymic surname is derived from Parsha, a diminutive form of the men's name Parfen. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P625]

Pasynkov
Пасынков. This s
urname originates from the term pasynok, meaning "step-son" or "foundling".  This term would have been given as a nickname to the son of one's husband or wife by a former spouse. The Pasynkovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Voronezh, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code P252]

Pavlov
Павлов.
Pavlov is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It is derived from Pavlo, a diminutive form of the men's name Pavel. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code P141]

Pechersky
Печерский. This surname indicates an ancestor who originated from the shores of the Pechora River which flows into the Arctic Ocean in northern Russia. It may also refer to an ancestor who originated from the city of Pechery in Pskov province, Russia. The Pecherskys among the Doukhobors resided in the province of Irkutsk, Russia in the 19th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P262]

Pentsov
Пенцов. Th
is patronymic surname is derived from Penets, a diminutive form of the men's names Peon and Feopent and perhaps Pavel, Pamfil, Pankrat, Pantelii and Parfenii The Pentsovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century.  Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P532]

Pepin
Пепин.
This patronymic surname is derived from Pepa, a diminutive form of the men's name Petr. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the dialect term pepa, meaning "simpleton". lEnglish spelling variants include: Peipin, Pepen, Pipin, Pypin.  [Soundex Code P150]

Peregudov
Перегудов. This surname originates from the term peregud, meaning a "strong or vociferous shout". The Peregudovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Perehudoff, Perehoodoff, Peregudoff, Peregoodoff, Peregudow, Perehudow, Perechudoff, Perehudov, Perehudove. [Soundex Code P623; P631]

Perevalov
Перевалов. Th
is surname originates from the term pereval, meaning a "mountain pass". Note that this term also referred to a "waddler", a "thief", a "cloudburst", "dragging across" and a "passage" in various dialects. The Perevalovs among the Doukhobors resided in the Russian province of Irkutsk in the 19th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code P614]

Perepelkin
Перепелкин. This surname originates from the term perepel, meaning "quail". This term may have been given as a nickname to a hunter or keeper of quails, or perhaps an amourous or timid individual. lEnglish spelling variants include: Perepelkin, Perepalkin, Perapolkin, Perepiolkin.  [Soundex Code P614]

Pereverzev
Переверзев.
This surname originates from the verb pereverziti, meaning "to muddle" or "to distort" in saying. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who turned every saying around so as to give it a distorted meaning. The Pereverzevs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Pereverseff, Pereversoff, Perverziff, Pereverzoff, Pereverzew, Perverseff, Periversoff, Perversoff, Perewersiv, Perewerziv, Perewersif, Perewerziff, Pereverzeff, Persoff.  [Soundex Code P616]

Perov
Перов. Thi
s surname originates from the term pero, meaning "feather". Note that this term also referred to a "fin" (of a fish) and a "blade" (of an oar). The Perovs among the Doukhobors resided in the Tobol'sk-Yenisei region of Russia in the 19th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code P610]

Petrenko
Петренко.
This surname is properly Petrov. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Petrov family in Tavria province, Russia in the early 19th century.  [Soundex Code B365]

Petrov
Петров.
Petrov is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It is patronymic in origin and is derived from the men's name Petr. The Petrovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Tambov region of Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Petroff, Petrow.  [Soundex Code P361]

Pichugin
Пичугин. This surname originates from the term pichuga, meaning "small bird" or "birdie". This term may have been given as an affectionate nickname. The Pichugins among the Doukhobors originated from the Azov region of Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P225]

Pimenov
Пименов. This
patronymic surname is derived from the Old Russian men's name Pimen. The Pimenovs among the Doukhobors resided in the province of Irkutsk, Russia in the 19th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P551]

Plaksin
Плаксин. This surname originates from the term plaksa, meaning "crier", "whiner" or "weeper". lEnglish spelling variants include: Plaxin, Plaxen, Plaskin, Ploxin.  [Soundex Code P425]

Plastun
Пластун.
This Ukrainian surname is derived from the plastun, the term for a special Cossack infantryman, a foot scout who moved on all fours, flat and low, on his stomach. The Plastuns among the Doukhobors resided in the province of Irkutsk, Russia in the 19th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P423]

Planidin
Планидин (Планида).
Among the Doukhobors, Planidin is a Russianization of the Ukrainian surname Planida. The -in suffix ending was added in the second half of the 19th century. It is derived from the Ukrainian term planida, meaning one's "fate" or "destiny". lEnglish spelling variants include: Planedin, Planiden, Plonidin, Planedyin, Planaden, Planydyn, Planden, Planida.  [Soundex Code P453]

Plokhov
Плохов (Плохий). Among the Doukhobors, Plokhov is a Russianization of the Ukrainian surname Plokhiy. The -ov suffix ending was added in the first half of the 19th century. It originates from the term plokha, meaning "badly" or "poorly". The Plokhovs (Plokhiys) among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tavria, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P421]

Plotnikov
Плотников.
This surname originates from the term plotnik, meaning "carpenter", a craftsman whose work was building with wood. The Plotnikovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. In 1970 the name was found to be the seventeenth most common Doukhobor surname in Canada. lEnglish spelling variants include: Plotnikoff, Plotnicove, Plotniko, Plotnikow, Platnikoff, Plotnikove.  [Soundex Code P435]

Pobirokhin
Побирохин.
Pobirokhin is a relatively uncommon surname in Russia. It is derived from the Old Russian term pobirukha, meaning "beggar". Note that this surname was borne by Ilarion Pobirokhin, leader of the Doukhobors in Tambov province, Russia from 1765-1790. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P162]

Podkolozov
Подколозов (
Подколзин). Among the Doukhobors, this name was originally Podkol'zin. The -ov suffix ending was added in the second half of the 19th century. It is derived from the term pod ("under") + kolozen' ("log"), meaning one who abides under a log. This nickname was given to a traitorous or malicious individual. The Podkolozovs (Podkolzins) among the Doukhobors originated from Kavkaz (Caucasus) province, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P324]

Podkovalnikov
Подковалников.
This surname originates from the verb podkovat', meaning "to shoe a horse". Podkovalnik was the name given to someone who shoed horses. The Podkovalnikovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P321]

Podomarev
Подомарев. Podomarev is derived from podomar, a variation of the term ponomar meaning "sexton". Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Ponomarev family in Tiflis province, Russia in the late 19th century. It was later adopted as an official surname by some family members. lEnglish spelling variants include: Podmoroff, Pudmoroff, Podmarow, Padmoroff, Podmaroff, Podmerow, Podmeroff, Podmoreoff, Pudmaroff, Padmeroff, Podmorow, Pudmoreff, Podmorrow, Podmore, Podmarove.  [Soundex Code P356]

Podovinnikov
Подовинников, Подовильников. This surname, also written as Podovil'nikov, is derived from the term pod ("under") + ovin ("threshing barn"). Podovinnik was the term for the fire pit in the lower floor of a peasant's threshing barn, used for drying the sheaves before threshing. Podovinnik was also the name of the fairytale spirit said to inhabit that place. lEnglish spelling variants include: Podovinikoff, Podovinnikoff, Podovinnikof, Padowinikoff, Podovennikoff, Podovelnikoff, Podavinikoff, Podovilnikoff, Podavinnikow, Podevilnikoff, Podowilnikoff, Podovinnekov, Padavelnecoff, Podovinnikove, Padavell, Podovin, Podavin, Podawin, Podwin, Podov.  [Soundex Code P315]

Podovsky
Подовский. This name is properly Podovinnikov. It originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Podovinnikov family in Tiflis and Kars provinces, Russia in the mid-19th century. It was later adopted as an official surname by some family members. lEnglish spelling variants include: Padowsky, Podowsky, Padowski, Padowskii, Podovski, Podovskii, Podovskij, Podovskiy, Podowski, Podosky, Podowisky.  [Soundex Code P312; P320]

Pogozhev
Погожев, Погожин (Погожий). This surname, sometimes also written as Pogozhin, is a Russianization of the Ukrainian surname Pogozhy. The -ov or -in suffix endings were added in the second half of the 19th century. It is derived from the term pogozhii, meaning "serene", "fresh" or "pure". The Pogozhevs (Pogozhys) among the Doukhobors originated from Kavkaz (Caucasus) province, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Pohozeff, Pohozoff, Pohozhev, Pogozhii, Pogozhiy.  [Soundex Code P221]

Poletaev
Полетаев. This surname originates from the dialect verb poletai, meaning to do something "flying", "fast" or "quick".  This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who somehow matched this description. The Poletaevs among the Doukhobors resided in the province of Irkutsk, Russia in the 19th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P431]

Polikarpov
Поликарпов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Polikarp. The Polikarpovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P426]

Poluektov
Полуектов. This surname is derived from Poluekt, a diminutive form of the men's name Polievkt. The Pouektovs among the Doukhobors originated from Tambov province, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P423]

Polovnikov
Половников. This surname originates from the term polovnik, meaning "sharecropper". The polovniki were a class of free, unindentured peasants who agreed to farm and remain on the land of a feudal lord or nobleman for a set number of years, and to pay a share of their crop to the landlord as rental. Note that this term also referred to a "ladle". The Polovnikovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Polovnikoff, Polonikoff, Polonicoff, Polovnicoff, Polonikow, Polovnikove.  [Soundex Code P415; P452]

Poltinov
Полтинов. Poltinov is derived from the term poltina, meaning "half a rouble". Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Bludov family in the Dmanisi region of Georgia in the late 19th and early 20th century, whose patriarch bore this nickname. [Soundex Code P435]

Polyakov
Поляков. Polyakov is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It originates from the term polyak, meaning "Pole" and indicates an ancestor who originated from Poland. There were two unrelated branches of Polyakovs among the Doukhobors that originated from the province of Tavria (Tauride) and the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P421]

Ponomarev
Пономарев. Ponomarev is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It originates from the term ponomar, meaning "sexton", an ecclesiastical official who took care of the Russian Orthodox church building, dug graves, rang the bell, etc. The Ponomarevs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Ponamaroff, Ponomarow, Ponomarov, Ponamoroff, Panamaroff, Ponomaroff, Ponomareff, Ponomarove, Ponomariov, Ponomaryov.  [Soundex Code P556]

Popov
Попов. Popov is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It originates from the term pop, a Russian Orthodox "priest". There were several unrelated branches of Popovs among the Doukhobors that originated from the provinces of Tambov, Ekaterinoslav, Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov), Kherson and the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. In 1970 it was found to be the most common Doukhobor surname in Canada. lEnglish spelling variants include: Popoff, Popove, Papove, Papov, Papoff, Popow, Papoe.  [Soundex Code P110]

Postnikov
Постников (Посников). This surname was originally written as Posnikov and is derived from the term posnik (or postnik), meaning "one who fasts". This nickname refers to the Russian Orthodox ritual of abstaining from certain foods during fast-days and other religious holidays. It may have been given to a particularly pious and zealous worshipper. The Postnikovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century. In 1970 it was found to be the fifth most common Doukhobor surname in Canada. lEnglish spelling variants include: Posnekoff, Posnikoff, Postnikoff, Postnekoff, Posnikow, Pasnekoff, Posnicoff, Postnikow, Posniakoff, Pastnikoff, Postnickoff, Pasnikoff, Posnikov, Postnikove.  [Soundex Code P235]

Potapov
Потапов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Potap. The Potapovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Potapoff, Potopoff, Potapow, Potopov.  [Soundex Code P311]

Povalyaev
Поваляев. This surname originates from the dialect verb povalyati, meaning "to throw down", "to tumble" or "to roll about". Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Goncharov family in Tavria province, Russia in the early 19th century. It was later adopted as an official surname by some family members. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P141]

Pozdnyakov
Поздняков (Позняков). This surname was originally written as Poznyakov and is derived from the term poznii (or pozdnii), meaning "late". Pozdnyak was the name given to a child born past the expected date or a child born to older parents. There were two unrelated branches of Pozdniakovs among the Doukhobors that originated from the provinces of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) and Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Pozdnikoff, Poznekoff, Poznikoff, Poznoff, Pozney, Pozdniakoff, Pozdniakow, Paznekoff, Pozdnekoff, Poznyakov, Pozdnyakov, Poznikow, Poznicov, Poznecov, Pozniakov, Pozdnikove.  [Soundex Code P235]

Prokofiev
Прокоф
иев. This patronymic surname is derived from Prokofy, a diminutive form of the men's name Prokopy. The Prokofievs among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P621]

Prokopenko
Прокопенко. This Ukrainian surname is derived from the men's name Prokopy. A Prokopenko family, originally of Stundist ancestry from the province of Kharkov, Russia, immigrated to Canada with the Doukhobors in the late 19th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Prokopenkoff.  [Soundex Code P621]

Prokudin
Прокудин. This surname originates from the dialect term prokuda, meaning a "prank", "tomfoolery", "joke" or "naughtiness". The Prokudins among the Doukhobors originated from the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code P623]

Prudnisky
Прудниский. Prudnisky is derived from the dialect term prudnii, meaning "pond", "dam" or "embankment" and refers to someone who lived near such a place. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Chutskov family in Tiflis province, Russia in the mid-19th century.  [Soundex Code P635]

Pryamorukov
Пряморуков.
Pryamorukov is a relatively uncommon surname in Russia. It originates from the term pryama ("straight" or "direct") + ruka ("hand" or "arm"), meaning "straight-handed". This term may have been given as a nickname to a frank, honest, direct, straightforward person. lEnglish spelling variants include: Pramarukoff, Premarukoff, Primorookoff, Pramorukoff, Priamorukov, Premaruko, Primerukoff, Primarukoff, Premerokoff, Pramarukove.  [Soundex Code P656]

Pudov
Пудов.
This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Pud. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the term pud, a unit of measure used in Old Russia. The Pudovs among the Doukhobors originated from Amur province, Russia in the 19th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P310]

Pugachev
Пугачев.
This surname originates from the term pugach, meaning "owl". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of an owl, perhaps a wise, alert or keen-sighted individual. Note that this term was also given to someone "who frightens". lEnglish spelling variants include: Poogacheff, Poogachoff, Pugachoff, Poohachow, Poohochoff, Poohachoff, Poogochoff, Pugacheff, Poogocheff, Pogocheff, Puhacheff, Puhachoff, Pugachov, Puhachov, Puhachev, Pugachiov, Pugachyov, Pugachove.  [Soundex Code P221; P210]

Pugin
Пугин.
This surname originates from the Ukrainian term puga, a type of whip or strap attached to a pole used to prod livestock. This term may have been used as nickname for someone who made or used this implement, or perhaps a "scary" or "intimidating" individual. Note that in some Russian dialects, this term also referred to an "egg", "heel", "dead-end" or "pillow". The Pugins among the Doukhobors resided in the Tobol'sk-Yenisei region of Russia in the mid-19th century, and in the Amur region in the latter 19th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code P250]

Pusov
Пусов.
Pusov is derived from Pusya, a diminutive form of the men's name Pavel. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Bludov family in the Dmanisi region of Georgia in the late 19th and early 20th century, whose patriarch bore this nickname. [Soundex Code P210]

Putilin
Путилин.
This patronymic surname is derived from Putilo, a diminutive form of the men's name Putislav. The Putilins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P345]

Pykhtin
Пыхтин.
This surname originates from the term pykhta, meaning "silver fir" tree, and may refer to someone who lived near a fir tree or grove. The Pykhtins among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Pictin, Picton, Picten, Peichtin, Pectin, Pikhtin.  [Soundex Code P235]

R -

Rakitin
Ракитин. Thi
s surname originates from the term rakita, meaning "brittle willow". Botanical nicknames such as this were popular among the agrarian Russian peasantry. The Rakitins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tula, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code R235]

Rasskazov
Рассказов.
This surname originates from the term rasskaz, meaning "tale" or "story". This term may have been given as a nickname to a talented narrator or story-teller, or perhaps an individual prone to exaggeration. The Rasskazovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code R221]

Razinkin
Разинкин, Разинков.
This surname, sometimes also written as Razinkov, is derived from Razenka, a diminutive form of the men's names Razumnik and Erazm. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the term razinya, meaning "scatter-brain". lEnglish spelling variants include: Rozinkin. [Soundex Code R252]

Remezov
Ремезов (Ремезь).
Among the Doukhobors, Remezov is a Russianization of the Ukrainian surname Remez'. The -ov suffix ending was added in the first half of the 19th century. It originates from the term remez, meaning "tomtit" or "wren". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of an wren, perhaps an industrious, talkative or singing individual. The Remezovs (Remezs) among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Remezoff, Remizove, Reimizoff, Rymizoff, Remizoff, Remesoff, Remisove, Remisoff, Ramsoff, Ramazoff, Remizove, Remizon.  [Soundex Code R521]

Repin
Репин.
This surname originates from the term repa, meaning "turnip". Botanical nicknames such as this were popular among the agrarian Russian peasantry. The Repins among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Rapin, Rypin, Ripin.  [Soundex Code R150]

Reshetnikov
Решетников. This surname originates from the term reshetnik, meaning "sieve-maker". The Reshetnikovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code R235]

Rezantsev
Резан
цев. This surname is derived from Riazanets, the term for an inhabitant of Riazan province, south-east of Moscow. It is also suggested that the name can derive from rezanets, the nickname given to a man cut or wounded in a fight. In 1970 it was found to be the fourteenth most common Doukhobor surname in Canada. lEnglish spelling variants include: Rezanseff, Rezansoff, Rizansoff, Rezantsoff, Rezansow, Rezanoff, Rezanov, Rezanuoff, Riezanuoff, Rouzanuoff, Rezanson.  [Soundex Code R253; R252]

Reznikov
Резников. This surname originates from the Ukrainian term reznik, meaning "butcher", someone whose job was to kill animals for meat and prepare meat for sale. The Ukrainian root of this name (compare the Russian term for butcher - myasnik) suggests that it is either a Ukrainianized Russian or a Russianized Ukrainian surname. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code R252]

Rodionov
Родионов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Rodion. The Rodionovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code R351]

Roldugin
Ролдугин. Thi
s surname originates from the Old Russian term rolduga, meaning "manufactured deer skin" or "buckskin".  This term may have been given as a nickname to a tanner or perhaps a maker or wearer of deer skin garments and footwear.  The Roldugins among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code R432]

Romanov
Романов. Romanov is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It is patronymic in origin and is derived from the men's name Roman. The Romanovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code R551]

Rozhnov
Рожнов. This surname originates from the dialect term rozhon, meaning a "sharp stake" used as a weapon.  Note that this term also referred to an "aggressive", "obstinate" or "dangerous" person. The Rozhnovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code R251]

Rudenko
Руденко. This Ukrainian surname originates from the term ruda, meaning "ochre-colored". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone with reddish hair color. The Rudenkos among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tavria (Tauride), Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code R352]

Rudnev
Руднев. This surname originates from the Old Russian term rudnyi, meaning "ochre-colored". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone with reddish hair color. The Rudnevs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code R351]

Rybalkin
Рыбалкин. This surname originates from the Ukrainian term rybalka, meaning "fisherman", someone whose occupation was catching fish. The Ukrainian root of this name (compare the Russian term for fisherman - rybaka) suggests that it is either a Ukrainianized Russian or a Russianized Ukrainian surname. lEnglish spelling variants include: Ribalkin, Rebalkin, Reebalkin, Reibalkin, Riebalkin, Ribalken, Balkan.  [Soundex Code R142]

Rybin
Рыбин (Рыбан). Among the Doukhobors, Rybin is a Russianization of the Ukrainian surname Ryban. The -in suffix ending was added in the first half of the 19th century. It is derived from the term ryba, meaning "fish". This term may have been given as a nickname to a fisherman, fish seller or someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a fish, perhaps a good swimmer. The Rybins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Ryban, Reibin, Reiben, Rebin, Reban, Riben, Reeben, Reabbin, Riebin, Ribin.  [Soundex Code R150]

Rybkin
Рыбкин. This surname originates from rybka, a diminutive form of the term ryba ("fish") meaning "little fish". This term may have been given as a nickname to a fisherman, fish seller or someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a fish, perhaps a good swimmer. The Rybkins among the Doukhobors originated from the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code R125]

Rykunov
Рыкунов. Thi
s surname originates from the term ryk, meaning "growl". Rykun was the name given to someone who growled. The Rykunovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Kiev, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code R251]

Ryl'kov
Рыльков, Рылькин.
This surname, sometimes also written as Ryl'kin,  originates from the term rylo, meaning "face", "mug", "muzzle" or "snout". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone with a prominent face, mouth or nose. There were two unrelated branches of Ryl'kovs among the Doukhobors that originated from the Russian provinces of Tavria (Tauride) and Tambov in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Rilkoff, Reilkoff, Rielkoff, Relkov, Rilcof, Relkow, Relkoff, Rilcoff, Rilkov, Rilkow, Rilkove.  [Soundex Code R421]

Ryzhkov
Рыжков. This surname originates from the term ryzhko, meaning "red". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone with reddish hair color. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code R221]

S -

Saburyaev
Сабуряев.
This is a Russianized Turkic surname derived from the term Sabur, meaning "The Patient" - one of the Turkic names of God. Surnames of this type were frequently borne by the descendants of Tatar nobles who transfered their allegiance to the Russian Tsars during the 15th and 16th centuries. The Saburyaevs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. According to tradition, members of this family adopted the new surname Solovyov after joining the Doukhobor movement. Note that this Doukhobor surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S161]

Sadkov
Садков.
This patronymic surname is derived from Sadko, a diminutive form of the men's name Sadok. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the Turkic term saduk, meaning "upright", "honest", "forward" and "sincere". The Sadkovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Sadkoff, Satkoff, Sutkoff.  [Soundex Code S321]

Salamatin
Саламатин.
This surname originates from the term salamata, a type of porridge or gruel popular in Old Russia. Food nicknames such as this were popular among the agrarian Russian peasantry. The Salamatins among the Doukhobors originated from the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code S453]

Salychev
Салычев.
This patronymic surname is derived from the Turkic men's name Salych. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S421]

Salykin
Салыкин.
This patronymic surname is derived from Salyk, a diminutive form of the men's names Selivan and Salaman. The Salikins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Salikin, Salekin, Salikene, Saleken, Salukin, Saliken, Salikan.  [Soundex Code S425]

Samoilov
Самойлов. This patronymic surname is derived from Samoilo, a diminutive form of the men's name Samuil. The Samoilovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Samoyloff, Samoylow, Samoiloff, Samoylov, Samoylove, Somoyloff, Samoilove.  [Soundex Code S541]

Samorodin
Самородин. Samorodin is derived from a spiritual connotation for the term samo ("one's self") + rodinii ("to deliver or give birth") meaning "one who gives birth to one's self". According to tradition, this surname was given by Doukhobor leader Savely Kapustin (1743-1820) to a member of the Tolmachev family in recognition of his outstanding Doukhobor faith and beliefs. Among non-Doukhobor Russians, the surname is commonly derived from the term smorodina, meaning "red currant" or "currant bush". lEnglish spelling variants include: Smorodin, Smoroden, Simorodin, Samorodine, Samerodin, Semorodin, Samiroden, Samirodin, Samaroden, Samarodin.  [Soundex Code S563]

Samsonov
Самсонов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Samson. There were several unrelated branches of Samsonovs among the Doukhobors that originated from the Russian provinces of Tambov, Ekaterinoslav and Kavkaz (Caucasus) in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Samsonoff, Samsenoff, Samsonow, Samsonove.  [Soundex Code S525]

Samylin
Самылин. This patronymic surname is derived from Samyl, a diminutive form of the men's name Samuil. The Samylins among the Doukhobors originated from the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S545]

Sanin
Санин.
This patronymic surname is derived from Sana, a diminutive form of the men's names Alexander and Disan. The Sanins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Kherson, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S550]

Saplin
Саплин.
This surname originates from the unflattering nickname sopli, meaning "snivel" or "snot". The Saplins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S145]

Sapozhnikov
Сапожников. This surname originates from the term sapozhnik, meaning "cobbler" or "shoemaker". Note that this term also referred to a "hatter". Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S125]

Saprikin
Саприкин.
This patronymic surname is derived from Saprika, a diminutive form of the men's name Sofron. The Saprikins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Soprikin, Saprekin, Sapriken, Sapriekin, Suprican, Saprikan, Schaprickyn. [Soundex Code S162]

Sapunov
Сапунов.
This surname is derived from the verb sapet' meaning to "snuffle". Sapun was the nickname given to a sniffler, someone who breathed noisily due to a cold or congestion. It is also suggested that the name can derive from Sapun, a diminutive form of the men's name Sapon or Sofon. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S151]

Sasikin
Сасикин.
This patronymic surname is derived from Sasik, a diminutive form of the men's name Sasonii. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S225]

Savenkov
Савенков (Савенко). Among the Doukhobors, Savenkov is a Russianization of the Ukrainian surname Savenko. The -v suffix ending was added in the second half of the 19th century. This name is patronymic in origin and is derived from the men's name Sava. The Savenkovs (Savenkos) among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Savinkoff, Savenkoff, Sawenkoff, Saweinkoff, Savenkow, Savinkoff, Savynkoff, Savinoff, Savenkove.  [Soundex Code S152]

Savel'ev
Савильев. This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Savely. There were two original unrelated branches of Savel'evs among the Doukhobors that originated from Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) province and the Don region of Russia in the 18th century.  Note that Savel'ev also occurred independently as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Strelyaev family in Elizavetpol and Kars provinces, Russia as well as the Savenkov family in Tiflis province, Russia, in the mid-19th century, whose patriarchs bore this name.  [Soundex Code S141]

Savinov
Савинов. Savinov is derived from the men's name Savin. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Kozlachkov family in Tavria province, Russia in the early 19th century, whose patriarch bore this name.  [Soundex Code S151]

Savitsky
Савицкий (Савицкков). This surname indicates an ancestor who originated from a village named Savitsy, Savichi or Savitskoye, so called from the men's name Savva. Among the Doukhobors, it was later modified to Savitskov by some family members. lEnglish spelling variants include: Savitsky, Savitski, Savitskii, Savitskiy, Savitskij, Savitskoff, Sovitskoff, Soviskov, Saviskoff, Sowitzkoff, Sovietskoff, Savitzkoff, Savitskow, Savitskov, Savitskove.  [Soundex Code S132]

Sedov
Седов. This surname originates from the term sedoi, meaning "grey". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone with grey hair, a grey beard or moustache or grey eyes. There were two unrelated branches of Sedovs among the Doukhobors that originated from Ekaterinoslav province and the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S310]

Selivanov
Селиванов. Selivanov is derived from the men's name Selivan. Among the Doukhobors, it originated in Tavria province, Russia in the early 19th century as an unofficial alternate surname for the descendants of Selivan Kolesnikov, leader of the Doukhobors in Ekaterinoslav province, Russia from 1740-1775. [Soundex Code S415]

Semenishchev
Семенищев. This patronymic surname is derived from Semenische, a diminutive form of the men's name Semyon. The Semenishchevs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Note that Semenishchev also occurred independently as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Popov family in Elizavetpol and Kars provinces, Russia in the mid-19th century, whose patriarch bore this name.  [Soundex Code S552]

Semenov
Семенов. Semenov is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It is patronymic in origin and is derived from the men's name Semyon. There were two unrelated branches of Semenovs among the Doukhobors that originated from the Don Region in the 18th century and that resided in Irkutsk province, Russia in the 19th century. In 1970 it was found to be the twelfth most common Doukhobor surname in Canada. lEnglish spelling variants include: Semenoff, Simenoff, Seminoff, Siminoff, Simonoff, Semenow, Smanoff, Symenoff, Semenove.  [Soundex Code S551]

Semenyutin
Семенютин. This patronymic surname is derived from Semenyuta, a diminutive form of the men's name Semyon. The Semeniutins among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S553]

Semin
Семин. Semin is derived from Syoma, a diminutive form of the men's name Semyon. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Chutskov family in Tiflis province, Russia in the mid-19th century, whose patriarch bore this name.  [Soundex Code S551]

Sereda
Середа. This Ukrainian surname is derived from the term sereda, meaning "Wednesday". This term may have been given as a nickname to a child born on the fourth day of the week. A Sereda family, originally of Stundist ancestry from the province of Kharkov, Russia, immigrated to Canada with the Doukhobors in the early 20th century. [Soundex Code S 630]

Sergeev
Сергеев.
This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Sergei. The Sergeevs among the Doukhobors resided in the province of Irkutsk, Russia in the 19th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S621]

Sergiev
Серг
иев. This patronymic surname is derived from Sergii, the Old Russian form of the men's name Sergei. The Sergievs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Penza, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S621]

Shalaev
Шалаев. This surname originates from the term shalyi, meaning "madcap", "prankish" or "mischievous". The Shalaevs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S410]

Shalimov
Шалимов. This surname originates from the Turkic term shalym, meaning "handful". This term may have been given as a nickname to a baby to emphasize its diminutiveness. The Shalimovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tavria, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S541]

Shamrikov
Шамриков.
Shamrikov originates from the dialect verb shamriti, meaning "to lisp". Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Shustov family in Tiflis province, Russia in the mid-19th century.  [Soundex Code S562]

Shamshurin
Шамшурин. Shamshurin originates from the term shamshura, meaning someone with a "lisp" or "burr". Note that this term also referred to a "lady's headdress". Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Shustov family in Tiflis province, Russia in the mid-19th century.  [Soundex Code S526]

Shapkin
Шапкин.
This surname originates from the term shapka, meaning "cap" or "headgear". The Shapkins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century.  [Soundex Code S125]

Sharov
Шаров. This surname originates from the term shary, meaning "spheres", "globes" or "balls".  Note that this term also means "eyes" in some Russian dialects.  This term may have been given as a nickname to someone with large or prominent eyes. The Sharovs among the Doukhobors resided in the province of Irkutsk, Russia in the 19th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code S610]

Shchegolev
Щеголев. This surname originates from the nickname shchegol, meaning "goldfinch". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a goldfinch, perhaps a gregarious, whistling or singing individual.  Note that this term also referred to a "foppish", "elegant", "dandy", "smart" or "boastful" individual. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S224]

Shchekinov
Щекинов (Щекин). Among the Doukhobors, this name was originally Shchekin. The -ov suffix ending was added in the second half of the 19th century. It is derived from the term shcheka, meaning "cheek". The Shchekinovs (Shchekins) among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century. A second unrelated Shchekin family of Doukhobors resided in the province of Irkutsk, Russia in the 19th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Shchekinoff, Schekinoff, Shikonoff, Chikanoff, Shikinoff.  [Soundex Code S251; S225]

Shcherbakov
Щербаков. Shcherbakov is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It originates from the term shcherbak, meaning "pock-marked" or "gap-toothed". Note that this term also referred to a "userer". lEnglish spelling variants include: Scherbakoff, Shcherbakoff, Scherbekoff, Sherbakoff, Sherbakow, Sherbakove, Sherbiko.  [Soundex Code S261; S612]

Shcherbinin
Щербинин. This surname originates from the term shcherbina meaning "chink", "crevice", "gap", "notch", scratch" or "scar". The Shcherbinins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Sherbinin, Scherbinin.  [Soundex Code S261; S615]

Shchirov
 
Щиров. This surname originates from the dialect term shchiryi, meaning a "straight line". Note that this term also referred to a "frank" or "sincere" person. The Shchirovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S261]

Shchukin
Щукин. This surname originates from the term shchuka, meaning "pike" fish. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a pike. The Shchukins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Shukin, Shuken, Shookin, Schoukin, Schookin, Schukin.  [Soundex Code S250]

Shenyakin
Шенякин. T
his surname originates from shenyaka, a diminutive form of the dialect term shenya, meaning "colt" or "foal". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a colt, perhaps a frisky, sportive or skittish individual. The Shenyakins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Poltava, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S525]

Shestakov
Шестаков. This surname originates from the term shestak, meaning "sixth". This term may have been given as a nickname to the sixth child in a family. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S232]

Sheyin
Шеин. This surname is derived from the term sheya, meaning "neck". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone with a prominent, stiff or sore neck. The Sheyins among the Doukhobors originated from the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S500]

Sherstobitov
Шерстобитов. This surname is derived from the term sherst ("wool") + the verb obit' ("to beat") and refers to a "fuller", a textile worker at a wool-spinning mill who cleaned, scoured and shook wool with a special bow to prepare it for spinning. The Sherstobitovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Sherstobitoff, Sherstobetoff, Sherstabitoff, Sherstobitow, Sherstibitoff, Sherstobetieff, Sherstebitoff, Sharstobitoff.  [Soundex Code S623]

Sheverdyaev
Шевердяев.
This surname derives from the dialect verb shevyryat', meaning "to stir up", "to pick" or "to rummage". Sheverda was the nickname given to someone who stirs something up. The Sheverdyaevs among the Doukhobors originated from the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S163]

Shilov
Шилов.
This surname originates from the term shil, meaning "awl". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who worked with an awl, or perhaps someone who was said to be as "sharp" as an awl. The Shilovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Shiloff, Sheloff, Shelloff, Shilow.  [Soundex Code S410]

Shishkin
Шишкин.
This surname is derived from the term shishka, meaning "bump", "cone", "swelling" or "knob". Note that this term was also given to a "boss", "bigshot" or "important" individual. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the Tatar term shish ka, meaning "swelling" or "prominence". lEnglish spelling variants include: Shishken, Shiskin. [Soundex Code S225]

Shkadronov
Шкадронов. This surname is derived from the dialect term shkadron, meaning horse "squadron" or "company". Note that this term also meant "horse tack".  This term may have been given as a nickname to horseman or to a maker of horse saddles, bridles and other tack. 
Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Goncharov family in the Bogdanovka region of Georgia in the late 19th and early 20th century, whose patriarch bore this nickname.  [Soundex Code S236]

Shkuratov
Шкуратов.
This surname originates from the term shkura, meaning "skin", "hide" or "leather". Shkurat was the term for a "rag" or "piece" of leather. lEnglish spelling variants include: Shkuratoff, Skuratow, Shkurotoff, Shkuratove, Shkooratoff, Skuratove, Skuratoff.  [Soundex Code S263; S631]

Shlyakhov
Шляхов. This surname originates from the dialect term shlyakh, meaning a "steppe road" leading to the southern borderlands of Russia and may refer to someone who lived near such a place, or perhaps a road inspector. The Shlyakhovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Shlakoff, Shalakoff, Shlakow, Shlakove, Shliakhov.  [Soundex Code S421]

Shmagin
Шмагин. Thi
s surname originates from the dialect verb shmagati, meaning "to whip" or "to lash".  It is also suggested that the name can derive from the dialect term shumaga, meaning "money". The Shmagins among the Doukhobors resided in Irkutsk province, Russia in the 19th century.  Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code M525]

Shtepselev
Штепселев. This surname is derived from the term shtepsel' meaning "plug", "switch", "cork" or "wedge".  Note this term may also refer to any "man" or "husband". 
Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Kalmykov family in the Bogdanovka region of Georgia in the late 19th and early 20th century, whose patriarch bore this nickname.  [Soundex Code S312]

Shuchkin
Шучкин.
This surname derives from the dialect term shuchka, meaning "joke", "jest" or "banter". The Shuchkins among the Doukhobors originated from the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S225]

Shul'gin
Шульгин. This surname originates from the dialect term shul'ga, meaning "left-hander". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who matched this physical description. The Shul'gins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S425]

Shumilin
Шумилин.
This surname originates from the nickname shumilo, meaning "shouter" or "noisy". lEnglish spelling variants include: Shumelin. [Soundex Code S545]

Shusherin
Шушерин. Thi
s surname originates from the dialect term shushera, meaning "rubbish" or "refuse". This term may have been given as a derogatory nickname or perhaps to a rubbish-collector.  The Shusherins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Voronezh, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S265]

Shustov
Шустов.
This surname originates from the term shust, meaning "smart", "vigilant" or "fussy". Note that this term also referred to a "greedy eater" or "glutton" and to a "ramrod" used to clean the barrels of firearms. lEnglish spelling variants include: Shustoff, Shoustoff, Shustow, Shustove. [Soundex Code S231]

Shvedov
Шведов. This surname originates from the term shved, meaning "Swede" and indicates an ancestor who originated from Sweden. The Shvedovs among the Doukhobors resided in the Tobol'sk-Yenisei region of Russia in the mid-19th century, and in the Amur region in the latter 19th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S131]

Shvetsov
Швецов. Shvetsov is derived from the dialect term shvets, meaning "tailor" - someone whose trade was making or repairing clothes. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Vyshlov family in Elizavetpol province, Russia in the late 19th century. It was later adopted as an official surname by some family members in Russia. [Soundex Code S132]

Sidorov
Сидоров. This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Sidor. The Sidorovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Kharkov-Ekaterinoslav region of Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code S361]

Skachkov
Скачков.
This surname originates from the term skachok, meaning "leap". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who was a "leaper" or "jumper". There were two unrelated branches of Skachkovs among the Doukhobors that originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav and the Don region of Russia. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S221]

Skibov
Скибов (
Скобейко). Among the Doukhobors, Skibov is a Russianization of the Belarusian surname Skobeiko. The -ov suffix ending was added in the first half of the 20th century. It is derived from the Belarusian term skoba, meaning "clamp", "brace", "clasp", "latch" or "staple". The Skibov (Skobeiko) family, originally of Belarusian ancestry from Brest province, Russia, joined the Doukhobor movement in Canada after marrying into the Parfenkov family. lEnglish spelling variants include: Skiboff, Skobeiko, Skobeyko, Skobeykoff.  [Soundex Code S110]

Skoblikov
Скобликов. This surname originates from the dialect term skoblik, meaning "gudgeon" or "minnow". It is also suggested that the name can derive from the verb skoblit' meaning "to scrape" (with a scraping-knife). Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S142]

Skripnichenko
Скрипниченко.
This Ukrainian surname originates from the term skripnik, meaning "fiddle-player". The Skripnichenkos among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S615]

Skripnikov
Скрипников (Скрипник). Among the Doukhobors, Skripnikov is a Russianization of the Ukrainian surname Skripnik. The -ov suffix ending was added in the first half of the 20th century. It originates from the term skripnik, meaning "fiddle-player". The Skripnikov (Skripnik) family, originally of non-Doukhobor ancestry from the province of Kiev, Russia, joined the Doukhobor movement in Canada in the early 20th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Skripnikoff, Skripnekoff, Skrepnekoff, Skripnik, Skripnek, Skrepnek.  [Soundex Code S615]

Skvortsov
Скворцов. This surname originates from the term skvorets, meaning "starling". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a starling, perhaps a cheerful, whistling or singing individual. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Goncharov family in the Bogdanovka region of Georgia in the late 19th and early 20th century, whose patriarch bore this nickname.  [Soundex Code S163]

Slastukhin
Сластухин.
This surname originates from the dialect term slastukha, meaning a sweet "dainty" or "pastry". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who made or ate this pastry, or perhaps as a term of endearment to a child or loved one.  The Slastukhins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Slastookin, Slastuchin, Slastukin.  [Soundex Code S423]

Slepov
Слепов.
Slepov is derived from the term slepoi, meaning "blind". Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Antyufeev family in Tiflis province, Russia in the mid-19th century, whose patriarch bore this nickname. It was later adopted as an official surname by some family members. lEnglish spelling variants include: Slepoff.  [Soundex Code S411]

Slobodin
Слободин.
This surname originates from sloboda, the term for a settlement of free peasants or cossacks in Old Russia, and may refer to an inhabitant of such a place. Note that this term also means "free" or "freedom" in some dialects. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S413]

Smagin
Смагин. This surname originates from the term smaga, meaning "soot", "pitch", "heat", "thirst", "blackness", "burnt", "dark" and "swarthy" in various dialects. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who somehow matched this description.  The Smagins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S525]

Smirnov
Смирнов. Smirnov is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It originates from the term smirnyi, meaning "timid", "quiet" or "peaceful". The Smirnovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Kharkov-Ekaterinoslav region of Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S565]

Smolin
Смолин. This surname derives from the term smola, meaning "tar". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone with black hair, or perhaps an annoying, constant person. The Smolins among the Doukhobors originated from the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S545]

Sofonov
Софонов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Sofon. The Sofonovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Safonov, Safonoff, Sofonoff. Sofonow, Safonove, Sophonoff, Saphanow, Sophonow.  [Soundex Code S151]

Sokolov
Соколов. This surname originates from the term sokol, meaning "falcon". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a falcon, perhaps a fierce, swift or keen-sighted individual. There were two unrelated branches of Sokolovs among the Doukhobors that originated from the provinces of Moskov and Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S241]

Solov'ev
Соловьев. This surname originates from the term solovei, meaning "nightingale". According to tradition, this surname was given by Doukhobor leader Savely Kapustin (1743-1820) to a member of the Saburyaev family whose singing voice was beautiful like that of a nightingale. lEnglish spelling variants include: Soloveoff, Soloveow, Soloveyov, Solovov, Solovioff, Solovev, Soloviov, Solovyov, Solovyev, Solovave.  [Soundex Code S411]

Sopov
Сопов. This surname originates from the verb sopiit' meaning to "snore", "snort" or "wheeze". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who breathed violently and noisily while awake or asleep. It is also suggested that the name can derive from Sopa, a diminutive form of the men's name Sapon or Sofon. The Sopovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Sopoff, Sopow, Supoff, Sopove.  [Soundex Code S110]

Sorokin
Сорокин. This surname originates from the term soroka, meaning "magpie". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a magpie, perhaps a cunning, noisy or pilfering individual. The original Sorokins among the Doukhobors hailed from the province of Astrakhan, Russia in the 18th century. No members of this family immigrated to Canada. Sorokin was also the name of a controversial non-Doukhobor Ukrainian from Kharkov, Russia, Stefan Soroka (1902-1984) who Russianized his name to Sorokin and assumed leadership of the "Sons of Freedom" Doukhobors in the 1950's.  [Soundex Code S625]

Sotnikov
Сотников. This surname is derived from sotnik, the term for a Cossack "squadron commander". The Sotnik was the officer in charge of a sotnia, a Cossack squadron of a hundred men. lEnglish spelling variants include: Sotnikoff, Sotnekoff, Sotnikow, Sotnikove.  [Soundex Code S352]

Stangvilov
Стангвилов (Стангвила).
Among the Doukhobors, Stangvilov is a Russianization of the Lithuanian surname Stangvila. The -ov suffix ending was added in the first half of the 20th century. It originates from the Lithuanian terms stang ("solid" or "resilient") + vil ("to wish" or "to desire"). The Stangvilov (Stangvila) family, originally of non-Doukhobor ancestry, joined the Doukhobor movement in Canada after marrying into the Konkin family. lEnglish spelling variants include: Stangviloff, Stanviloff.  [Soundex Code S352]

Starchikov
Старчиков.
Starchikov is derived from the term starichok, meaning "elder" or "oldster". Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Postnikov family in Kars province, Russia in the late 19th century, whose patriarch bore this nickname.  [Soundex Code S362]

Starodubov
Стародубов. This surname originates from the term staryi ("old") + dub ("oak"). The resulting nickname starodub, literally meaning "old oak", referred to a "wise", "honest", "strong" or "steadfast" individual. The Starodubovs among the Doukhobors resided in the Tobol'sk-Yenisei region of Russia in the early 19th century, and in the Amur region in the latter 19th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S363]

Starodubtsev
Стародубцев. This surname is derived from Starodubets, the term for an inhabitant of the town of Starodub, south-west of Moscow. The Starodubtsevs among the Doukhobors resided in the Tobol'sk-Yenisei region of Russia in the 19th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S363]

Startsev
Старцев. Thi
s surname originates from the term starets, meaning "old man" or "elder". It is also suggested that the name can derive from the term staritsa, meaning "old woman" or "nun". The Startsevs among the Doukhobors originated from Tambov province, Russia in the 18th century.  Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S363]

Stepanov
Степанов.
This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Stepan. The Stepanovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S315]

Storozhev
Сторожев. This surname originates from the term storozh, meaning "guard", "watchman", "gaoler" or "porter". lEnglish spelling variants include: Storjeff, Storgeoff, Storgoff, Starshiff, Starjeff, Starjiff, Storgeff, Sturgeoff, Storgow, Storeshaw, Storsheff, Storgove.  [Soundex Code S362]

Strelyaev
Стреляев.
This surname originates from the verb strelyat' meaning "to shoot" an arrow (strela). The Strelyaevs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Voronezh, Russia in the 18th century. In 1970 the name was found to be the ninth most common Doukhobor surname in Canada. lEnglish spelling variants include: Strelaeff, Strelieff, Strelioff, Streleff, Strelive, Strelieve, Strelove, Straloff, Striloff, Streleoff, Strilioff, Strelaioff, Streloff, Strelov, Strellioff, Strilaeff, Stroloff, Stralieff, Streliaoff, Strilieff, Strilaiff, Strilaeff, Strelaff, Strelow, Strelaev, Strelayev, Streliaev, Streliev, Strealieff, Strellaeff, Streliaff, Strelaeff, Strelayeff, Strilive, Streliaeff, Streleaff, Strelaif, Streliaiff, Streleiff, Strelleaff, Strelau, Strulow. [Soundex Code S364]

Strel'nikov
Стрельников. This surname originates from the term strelnik, meaning "archer". The Strelnikovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.   [Soundex Code S364]

Stroev
Строев.
This surname originates from the term stroi, meaning "build". This term may have been given as a nickname to a builder or perhaps a well-built individual. Note that this term also referred to a cripple or beggar. The Stroevs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S361]

Stroganov
Строганов.
This surname originates from the term strogii, meaning "severe", "strict" or "vigilant". It is also suggested that the name can derive from the verb strogat' meaning "to plane" or "to shave". The Stroganovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S362]

Strukov
Струков.
This surname originates from the term struk, meaning "pod", "conch" or "shell". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone small or undersized in stature. The Strukovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Strukoff, Strookoff, Strukow, Strookow, Strukove.  [Soundex Code S362]

Stuchnov
Стучнов (Штучнов, Штучни
й). Among the Doukhobors, this surname was originally written as Shtuchnov and is a Russianization of the Ukrainian surname Shtuchniy. The -ov suffix ending was added in the second half of the 19th century. It is derived from the Ukrainian term shtuchnii, meaning "skillful", "cunning" or "crafty". The Shtuchnovs (Shtuchniys) among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. In 1970 the name was found to be the tenth most common Doukhobor surname in Canada. lEnglish spelling variants include: Stoshnof, Stushnoe, Stoochinoff, Stoochnof, Stoochnoff, Stushnaff, Stoochnow, Stooshinoff, Stoshnoff, Stooshnof, Stooshnov, Stooshinoff, Stoushnow, Stushnoff, Steuchnoff, Stushnow, Stocknow, Stooshnoff, Stuchnow, Stuchinoff, Stuchnoff.  [Soundex Code S325]

Studenikin
Студеникин.
This surname originates from the dialect term studen' meaning "icy cold" or "December".  Studenik was the name given to a "cold" or "chilly" person.  The Studenikins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Orenburg, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S335]

Stupnikov
Ступников.
This surname originates from the term stupnik, someone who made or sold stupni ("mortar") or stupnyami ("footwear"). Note that this term also referred to a "beaten, even track" in a forest. The Stupnikovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Penza in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Stoopnikoff, Stupnikoff, Stoopnekoff, Stupnikow.   [Soundex Code S315]

Subbotin
Субботин. This surname originates from the term Subbota, meaning "Saturday". This term may have been given as a nickname to a child born on the seventh day of the week. There were two unrelated branches of Subbotins among the Doukhobors, the original of which did not immigrate to Canada. However, a second family of non-Doukhobor Russian ancestry from the province of Yakutsk, Russia, immigrated to Canada with the Doukhobors after marrying into the Zbitnev family. lEnglish spelling variants include: Soobotin, Subotin.  [Soundex Code S135]

Sukhachev
Сухачев. This surname is derived from the Old Russian term sukhach, meaning a "dry", "thin" or "hard' person. Note that this term also referred to a "dry wine". The Sukhachevs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Sookocheff, Sookachoff, Soukocheff, Sukochoff, Sokocheff, Sookotcheff, Sookochoff, Soukochoff, Souhachoff, Soohochoff, Sookochow, Sukachev.  [Soundex Code S221]

Sukharev
Сухарев. This surname originates from the term sukhari, meaning "hardtack", a hard, dry biscuit eaten by travellers and soldiers in Old Russia. Food nicknames such as this were popular among the agrarian Russian peasantry. The Sukharevs among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Soukeroff, Soukoreff, Soukoroff, Sookoroff, Sukoroff, Sookeroff, Sukhoreff, Sukorow, Sookro, Sukorove, Sookero.  [Soundex Code S261]

Sukhodolin
Суходолин. This surname originates from the term sukhodol, meaning a "dry, waterless valley" and may refer to an inhabitant of such a place. The Sukhodolins among the Doukhobors resided in Irkutsk province, Russia in the early 19th century, the Tobol'sk-Yenisei region of Russia in the mid-19th century, and in the Amur region in the latter 19th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S234]

Sukhorukov
Сухоруков. This surname is derived from the term sukhoi ("dry") + ruka ("arm"), meaning "dry-armed". This term was given as a nickname to someone with a lame, paralyzed or missing arm. The Sukhorukovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Sookarookoff, Saukarookoff, Sookorookoff, Sukharukoff, Saukerookoff, Soukerookoff, Sookorukoff, Suchorukoff, Suchorykoff, Sookerokoff, Soukorokoff, Sokorokoff, Sukerokoff, Sukorukoff, Sukorukow, Soukorookoff, Sukarukoff, Sukorokoff, Sookerukoff, Sukhorokoff, Sukorukove.  [Soundex Code S262]

Sukhoveev
Суховеев.
This surname originates from sukhovei, the term for a "hot dry wind" on the Russian steppes. This term may have been given as a nickname to a child whose birth was marked by such natural phenomenon. According to historical records, this surname was adopted by members of the Sukhovkin family after joining the Doukhobor movement. lEnglish spelling variants include: Sookavieff, Sookoveoff, Sukoveoff, Sookovieff, Sukovaoff, Sukavieff, Sukoveow, Sookaveiff, Sukhoveyev, Sukhovyev, Sukhoviev, Sukhovyov, Suchaveiff, Suhawieff, Suchovioff, Suchoweff, Sukhovioff, Soukovioff, Suchowew, Sukhoviov, Sukovave. [Soundex Code S211]

Sukhovkin
Суховкин. T
his surname is derived from the term sukhoi, meaning "dry". It is also suggested that the name indicates a family that originated from the Sukhovka river in northern Russia or any one of several towns named Sukhovka or Sukhovo throughout Russia. The Sukhovkins among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century. According to historical records, members of this family adopted the new surname Sukhoveev after joining the Doukhobor movement. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S212]

Sukrutov
Сукрутов.
Sukrutov is derived from the term sukruta, meaning a "twisted rope". Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Trubitsin family in Tavria province, Russia in the early 19th century.   [Soundex Code S263]

Sulanov
Суланов.
This surname may derive from the dialect term sula, meaning a "restless", "fussy" or "fidgety" person. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the Turkic men's name Sulan. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S451]

Sumkin
Сумкин. This surname originates sumka, a diminutive form of the term suma, meaning "bag", "satchel" or "handbag". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who made, wore or used a bag. The Sumkins among the Doukhobors originated from Kiev province, Russia in the 18th century.  Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code S525]

Surovtsov
Суровцов. Th
is surname originates from the term surovets, a type of sour drink popular in Old Russia. Food nicknames such as this were popular among the agrarian Russian peasantry. The Surovtsovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century.  Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S613]

Surkov
Сурков.
This surname derives from the term surok, meaning "marmot" or "woodchuck". The Surkovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S621]

Suslin
Суслин. This
surname originates from the term suslo, a type of sweet drink made from malt and flour in Old Russia.  Note that this term also refers to "mash", a mixture of hot water and crushed grain used to produce malt beverages. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who made or drank suslo. The Suslins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Voronezh, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S245]

Suslov
Суслов. This
surname originates from the term suslo, a type of sweet drink made from malt and flour in Old Russia.  Note that this term also refers to "mash", a mixture of hot water and crushed grain used to produce malt beverages. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who made or drank suslo. The Suslovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S241]

Susoev
Сусоев.
This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Susoi. The Susoyevs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Susoyeff, Susoeff, Sosoyoff, Sysoyev.  [Soundex Code S210]

Suvorin
Суворин. Thi
s surname originates from the term suvor, meaning "gloomy", "unsociable" or "severe". The Suvorins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S165]

Suvorkin
Суворкин.
This surname is derived from the Old Russian term suvorka, meaning "grim", "gloomy" or "unsociable". The Suvorkins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S162]

Suzdal'tsev
Суздальцев. This surname is derived from Suzdalets, the term for an inhabitant of the town of Suzdal, north-east of Moscow. The Suzdaltsevs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S234]

Svetlichny
Светличний (Светличнов, Светли
щев, Светличков). This Ukrainian surname originates from the dialect term svetlitsa, meaning a "white log hut", "weaver's log hut" or the "front room" or "drawing room" of a hut and may refer to someone who lived at such a place.  It may also refer to an inhabitant of any one of several places named Svetlitsa in Old Russia. Among the Doukhobors, it was later modified to Svetlichkov, Svetlichnov and Svetlishchev by some family members. lEnglish spelling variants include: Svetlichny, Svetlichnii, Svetlichnyi, Svetlichnij, Svetlichnov, Svetlichnoff, Swetlishnoff, Swetleshnoff, Swetlishneff, Swetlow, Svetlishchev, Svetlischev, Svetlishcheff, Swetlisheff, Swetlishoff, Svetlisheff, Svetlishoff, Swetlischeff, Swetlishow, Svetlischeff, Switlishoff.  [Soundex Code S134]

Svetlikov
Светликов. This surname originates from the term svetlik,
a diminutive form of the term svetlyi ("light") meaning "little light". Note that this term also means "eyebright" (euphrasy), a type of flowering plant.  According to historical records, this surname was adopted by members of the Svetlov family after joining the Doukhobor movement.  lEnglish spelling variants include: Swetlikoff, Swetlikoe, Svetlikoff, Swetlikow, Sviatlikoff, Swetlicoe, Svetlikove, Svitlekoff, Swetlikove.  [Soundex Code S134; S342]

Svetlov
Светлов. Svetlov
is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It originates from the term svetlo, meaning "light", "bright" or "shining". According to historical records, members of this family adopted the new surname Svetlikov after joining the Doukhobor movement. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S134]

Sviridov
Свиридов.
This patronymic surname is derived from Svirida, a diminutive form of the men's name Spiridon. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S163]

T -

Tanyushin
Танюшин.
Tanyushin is derived from Tanyusha, a diminutive form of the women's name Tatyana. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Ryl'kov family in Tavria province, Russia in the mid-19th century, whose matriarch bore this nickname.  [Soundex Code T525]

Tarabukin
Тарабукин. Thi
s surname originates from the term tarabuka, a type of string instrument played in Old Russia. This term may have been given as a nickname to a peasant musician who played the tarabuka, a maker of the instrument or perhaps a loud or shrill individual. The Tarabukins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code T612]

Taranov
Таранов, Таранков. This patronymic surname, sometimes also written as Tarankov, is derived from the men's name Taran. lEnglish spelling variants include: Taranoff, Terinoff, Taranow, Tarankov, Tarankoff. [Soundex Code T651]

Tarasiev
Тарасиев. T
his patronymic surname is derived from Tarasii, the Old Russian form of the men's name Taras. The Tarasievs among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century.  Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code T621]

Tarasov
Тарасов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Taras. There were two unrelated branches of Tarasovs among the Doukhobors that originated from the province of Tambov and the Don region of Russia. In 1970 it was found to be the eighteenth most common Doukhobor surname in Canada. lEnglish spelling variants include: Tarasoff, Trasov, Trasoff, Torosoff, Tarasow, Terasoff, Tarasove.  [Soundex Code T621]

Tatosov
Татосов. Tatosov is derived from the Armenian men's name Tatos, meaning "fatherly". Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Makaseev family in the Bogdanovka region of Georgia in the late 19th and early 20th century, whose patriarch bore this name, most likely as a nickname. [Soundex Code T321]

Telegin
Телегин. This surname originates from the term telega, meaning "cart". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who drove or manufactured carts. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Novokshonov family in Elizavetpol and Kars provinces, Russia in the mid-19th century, whose patriarch bore this nickname. [Soundex Code T425]

Telushkin
Телушкин.
This surname originates from the term telushka, meaning "heifer" (a young unbred cow). Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code T422]

Teplyakov
Тепляков. This s
urname originates from the term teplyaki, a type of felt boot worn by peasants in Old Russia. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who wore teplayki, or perhaps a maker of such boots. The Teplyakovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Voronezh, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code T142]

Terekhov
Терехов. This patronymic surname is derived from Terekh, a diminutive form of the men's name Terentii.  lEnglish spelling variants include: Terekoff, Terichow, Terrichoff, Terikow, Terikhoff, Terikoff, Terekove.  [Soundex Code T621]

Terent'ev
Терентьев. This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Terentii. The Terent'evs among the Doukhobors originated from Kavkaz (Caucasus) province, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code T653]

Tertishnikov
Тертишников.
This surname originates from the Ukrainian term tertish, meaning a "well-kneaded bread". Tertishnik was the name given to a "dough-kneader" or "baker" of such bread. The Tertishnikovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code T632]

Tikhonov
Тихонов.
Tikhonov is derived from the men's name Tikhon. The original Tikhonovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Ekaterinoslav in the 18th century. Note that Tikhonov also occurred independently as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Popov family in Tiflis and Kars provinces, Russia in the mid-19th century, whose patriarch bore this nickname; it was later adopted as an official surname by some family members. lEnglish spelling variants include: Tehanoff, Tekanoff, Tekanow, Tickonoff, Tehanow, Tekano, Tihanoff. [Soundex Code T251]

Timofeev
Тимофеев.
This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Timofei. The Timofeevs among the Doukhobors resided in the province of Irkutsk, Russia in the 19th century.  Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code T511]

Tolmachev
Толмачев. This surname originates from the term tolmach, meaning "interpreter". The Tolmachevs among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century. According to tradition, some members of this family adopted the new surname Samorodin after joining the Doukhobor movement. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code T452]

Tolstoev
Толстоев.
This surname originates from the term tolstoi, meaning "fat". This term was given as a nickname to someone who matched this description. The Tolstoevs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code T423] 

Tomilin
Томилин.
This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Tomila. The Tomilins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Tamelin, Tamilin, Tomlin, Tameelin, Tomelin.  [Soundex Code T545]

Trofimenkov
Трофименков.
This surname is derived from the men's name Trofim. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Trofimov family in Tiflis province, Russia in the mid-19th century. It was later adopted as an official surname by some family members. Among non-Doukhobor Russians, this surname may also be a Russianization of the Ukrainian surname Trofimenko, which is derived from the men's name Trofim. lEnglish spelling variants include: Trofimenkoff, Trofemenkoff, Trofimenko, Trafimenkoff, Trofimenkow, Trofimenkove.  [Soundex Code T615]

Trofimov
Трофимов.
Trofimov is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It is patronymic in origin and is derived from the men's name Trofim. There were two unrelated branches of Trofimovs among the Doukhobors that originated from the Russian provinces of Penza and Ekaterinoslav in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code T615]

Trubetskoy
Трубецкой (Трубецков). This surname indicates an ancestor who originated from the princely estate of Trubets in Old Russia. Among the Doukhobors, it was later modified to Trubetskov by some family members. The Trubetskoys (Trubetskovs) among the Doukhobors originated from the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Trubetskoi, Trubetsky, Troubetzkoy, Troobetscoff, Trubetskoff, Trubitskoff, Troubitskoff, Troobetscoff, Tribitskoff, Troobetskoff.  [Soundex Code T613]

Trubitsin
Трубицин. This surname is derived from the Old Russian term trubitsa, meaning a small "pipe" or "horn". The original Trubitsins among the Doukhobors originated from Ekaterinoslav province, Russia in the 18th century. Note that Trubitsin also occurred independently as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Trubetskoy family in Elizavetpol and Kars provinces, Russia in the mid-19th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Troobitsin, Trubitzin. [Soundex Code T613]

Trushin
Трушин. Trushin is derived from Trusha, a diminutive form of the men's name Trifon. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Ryl'kov family in Elizavetpol and Kars provinces, Russia in the mid-19th century, whose patriarch bore this name.  [Soundex Code T625]

Tsybulin
Цибулин. This surname originates from the term tsybulya, meaning "onion". Botanical nicknames such as this were popular among the agrarian Russian peasantry. The Tsybulins among the Doukhobors originated from the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code T214]

Tsybul'kin
Цибулькин. This surname originates from the term tsybulya, meaning "onion". Botanical nicknames such as this were popular among the agrarian Russian peasantry. The Tsybul'kins among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Poltava in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code T214]

Tsyplakov
Цыплаков. This surname originates from the dialect term tsyplak, meaning "chick" or "baby bird".  This term may have been given as an affectionate nickname. The Tsyplakovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Orenburg, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code T214]

Tulikov
Туликов. This surname derives from the dialect term tulik, meaning a "sharp", "quick", "nimble", "agile" or "good" fellow. The Tulikovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Voronezh, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code T421]

Tulin
Тулин. This surname originates from the term tul, meaning "quiver", a case to hold the arrows of a hunter or warrior. It is also suggested that the name may derive from the verb tulit' meaning "to hide" or "to conceal" or that it may indicate an ancestor who originated from Tula province, south of Moscow. The Tulins among the Doukhobors resided in the Tobol'sk-Yenisei region of Russia in the early 19th century, and in the Amur region in the latter 19th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code T450]

Tulinov
Тулинов. This name was originally Tulin. The -ov suffix ending was added after the surname was originally formed. It originates from the term tulo, meaning "quiver", a case to hold arrows. The Tulinov family joined the Amur Doukhobors after marrying into the Emelyanov family in the early 20th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code T451]

Tupikin
Тупикин.
This surname originates from the term tupik, meaning "blockhead" or "dolt". The Tupikins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code T125]

Turtsev
Турцев. This surname derives from the term turets, meaning a small "bison" or "bull". Note that this term may also be used to refer to a "Turk". It is also suggested that the name indicates an ancestor who originated from the Belorussian town of Turets. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code T632]

Tyurin
Тюрин. This surname originates from tyurya, the term given to bread steeped in water, kvass or milk (a meal eaten by beggars and the poor). Note that this term also referred to a "languid" or "spineless" individual. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the verb tiurit' meaning "to lie" or "to confuse". The Tiurins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov), Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code T650]

U -

Uglov
Углов. Uglov is derived from a spiritual connotation for the term ugol meaning "foundation-corner". According to tradition, this surname was given by Doukhobor leader Savely Kapustin (1743-1820) to a member of the Kruglov family on account of his outstanding Doukhobor faith and beliefs. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the term ugol' meaning "coal". lEnglish spelling variants include: Ogloff, Oglow, Ohlow, Uhlov, Oglou, Oglov, Ogoloff, Uhlow, Uglove.  [Soundex Code U241]

Ulasov
Уласов. This patronymic surname is derived from Ulas, a Byelorussian form of the men's name Vlas. The Ulasovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code U421]

Ul'yashin
Ульяшин. Ul'yashin is derived from Ulyasha, a diminutive form of the women's name Ulyana. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Chernenkov family in Tiflis province, Russia in the mid-19th century, whose matriarch bore this name. [Soundex Code U425]

Usachev
Усачев. This surname originates from the term usach, meaning "bushy moustache". This term would have been given as a nickname to a man with a broad, bushy moustache. The Usachevs among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Osachov, Osachoff, Osatchoff, Osochoff, Osachow, Osacheff, Usachov, Usachiov, Usachoff, Oosachoff, Oosatcheff, Usachow, Usachyov, Usachove, Osachove.  [Soundex Code U221; O221]

Utkin
Уткин. This surname originates from the term utka, meaning "duck". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a duck, perhaps a loud, gregarious individual, or a good swimmer. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code U325]

Uvarov
Уваров.
This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Uvar. The Uvarovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code U161]

Uverenniy
Уверенни
й. Uverenniy is derived from a spiritual connotation for the term uverennie, meaning "assured of" or "convinced". According to tradition, this surname was given by Doukhobor leader Peter "Lordly" Verigin (1859-1924) to a member of the Medvedev family on account of his outstanding Doukhobor faith and beliefs. Note that this Doukhobor surname occurred only in Canada. lEnglish spelling variants include: Overenny, Overennay.  [Soundex Code O165]

V -

Vanin
Ванин.
This patronymic surname is derived from Vanya, a diminutive form of the men's name Ivan. lEnglish spelling variants include: Vannin, Wanin.  [Soundex Code V550]

Vanzhov
Ванжов (Ванжа). Among the Doukhobors,
Vanzhov is a Russianization of the Ukrainian surname Vanzha. The -ov suffix ending was added in the second half of the 19th century. It originates from Vanzha, a rare diminutive form of the men's name Ivan. The Vanzhovs (Vanzhas) among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Vanjoff, Wanjoff, Wanjoe, Vanzhov, Vangoff, Vandjoff, Vanjove, Van Joff.  [Soundex Code V521]

Varakin
Варакин.
This patronymic surname is derived from the Mordvinian men's name Varaka. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code V625]

Vasilenkov
Василенков (Василенко). Among the Doukhobors, Vasilenkov is a Russianization of the Ukrainian surname Vasilenko. The -v suffix ending was added in the 19th century. This name is patronymic in origin and is derived from the men's name Vasily. The Vasilenkovs (Vasilenkos) among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Wasilenkoff, Waselenkoff, Wasilenko, Wasilenkow, Vasilenko, Vasilenkove, Wasilenkove.  [Soundex Code V245; W245]

Vasil'ev
Васильев. Vasil'ev is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It originates from the men's name Vasily. There were two unrelated branches of Vasil'evs among the Doukhobors that originated from the Russian provinces of Tambov and Ekaterinoslav in the 18th century.  Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code V241]

Vereshchagin
Верещагин. This surname originates from the term vereshchaga, meaning "chatterer", "talker", "grumbler" or "squeeler". There were two unrelated branches of Vereshchagins among the Doukhobors that originated from Tambov province, Russia in the 18th century and resided in Irkutsk province, Russia in the 19th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Vereshagin, Vereschagin, Verishine, Vereshine, Vereshagen, Vershagin, Verashegan, Verishagin, Wereschagin, Wirischagin.  [Soundex Code V622]

Verigin
Веригин. This surname originates from the term veriga, meaning "chain", "fetter", "shackle" or "bond". The Verigins among the Doukhobors originated from the Kharkov-Ekaterinoslav region of Russia in the 18th century. Note that this surname was borne by several Doukhobor leaders including Peter "Lordly" Verigin (1859-1924) and his son Peter "Chistyakov" Verigin (1881-1939). In 1970 it was found to be the seventh most common Doukhobor surname in Canada.lEnglish spelling variants include: Verigen, Veregin, Verehin, Vergin.  [Soundex Code V625]

Vikhrov
Вихров.
This surname originates from the term vikhor, meaning "forelock" or "tuft". It is also suggested that the name can derive from the term vikhr' meaning "whirlwind". The Vikhrovs among the Doukhobors resided in Amur province, Russia in the late 19th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code V261]

Viktorenkov
Викторенков. Among the Doukhobors this surname is derived from Viktorenka, a diminutive form of the men's name Viktor, and it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Gololobov family in the Bogdanovka region of Georgia in the late 19th and early 20th century, whose patriarch bore this name. Among non-Doukhobor Russians, this surname may also be a Russianization of the Ukrainian surname Viktorenko, derived from the men's name Viktor.  [Soundex Code V236]

Vlasov
Власов.
Vlasov is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It is patronymic in origin and is derived from the men's name Vlasii. There were two unrelated branches of Vlasovs among the Doukhobors that originated from the province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) and the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Wlasoff, Wolosoff, Vlasoff, Vlasow.  [Soundex Code V421]

Vodopshin
Водопшин.
This surname originates from the term voda ("water") + the verb pit' ("to drink") or "water-drinker". This nickname was probably given to a drunkard. The Vodopshins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code V312]

Volobuev
Волобуев.
This surname is derived from the Don Cossack term volobui, meaning "oxen-slaughterer". This name was given to a butcher who prepared oxen meat for food or sale. There were two unrelated branches of Volubuevs among the Doukhobors, one of which originated from the Don region of Russia in the 18th century, and the other of which resided in the Tobolsk-Yenisei region of Russia in the early 19th century, and the Amur region in the late 19th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code V411]

Volodin
Володин.
This patronymic surname is derived from Volodya, a diminutive form of the men's name Vladimir. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code V435]

Vorob'ev
Воробьев. Vorob'ev is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It originates from the term vorob, meaning "sparrow". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a sparrow, perhaps a swift, cheerful or singing individual. The Vorob'evs among the Doukhobors originated from the Azov region of Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Vorobieff, Varabioff, Worobioff, Varabieff, Verabioff, Vorobow, Vorobeyov, Vorobiov, Vorobyev, Vorobiev, Variobiev, Varabave.  [Soundex Code V611]

Voronkov
Воронков (Воронов). Among the Doukhobors, this name was originally Voronov. The "k" was added in the second half of the 19th century. It is derived from the term voron ("raven") or vorona ("crow"). This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a raven or crow, perhaps a harsh-voiced or black-haired individual. lEnglish spelling variants include: Voronkoff, Warankoff, Voronkow, Voronkove.  [Soundex Code V652]

Voykin
Войкин. This surname is derived from the term voyko, a diminutive form of the term voin, meaning "soldier" or "warrior" or else the term voy, meaning "howl" or "cry".  The Voykins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. In 1970 it was found to be the eleventh most common Doukhobor surname in Canada. lEnglish spelling variants include: Voykin, Woykin, Woikin, Voyken, Woiken, Waiken, Voiken.  [Soundex Code V250; W250]

Vyatkin
Вяткин. This surname indicates an ancestor who originated from Vyatka province, east of Moscow. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the term vyatka, meaning "band" or "crowd" or "wedge". lEnglish spelling variants include: Vatkin, Viatkin, Wetkin, Wiatkin.  [Soundex Code V325]

Vypov
Выпов. Th
is surname originates from the term vyp' meaning "bittern", a type of marsh bird. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a bittern, perhaps a long-legged, shy or singing individual. The Vypovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Voronezh, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code V110]

Vyshlov
Вышлов.
Vyshlov is a relatively uncommon surname in Russia. It originates from the verb vyshel, meaning "to leave" or "to walk out". According to tradition, this name was given to the original family patriarch after leaving the Russian Orthodox Church and converting to the Doukhobor faith. lEnglish spelling variants include: Wishloff, Wishlow, Vishloff, Wishlaw, Vishlov, Vishlove, Wishlove, Wieshlow.  [Soundex Code V241; W241]

Y -

Yakovlev
Яковлев. This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Yakov. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code Y214]

Yanin
Янин. Yanin is derived from Yan, a variation of the Old Russian men's name Ioann.  Among the Doukhobors, it originated in the late 19th century as an unofficial alternate surname for a family in Kars province, Russia whose official surname has not been identified. [Soundex Code Y550]

Yaroshenko
Ярошенко, Ярошев. This Ukrainian surname is derived from Yarosh, a diminutive form of the men's name Erofei.  Among the Doukhobors, it was later Russianized to Yaroshev by dropping the -enko suffix ending in the mid-19th century. The Yaroshchenkos (Yaroshevs) among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tavria, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code Y625]

Yarovenko
Яровенко. This Ukrainian surname is derived from Yar, a diminutive form of the men's names Yaropolk and Yaroslav. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the term yaryy, meaning "furious" or "violent". The Yarovenkos among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Voronezh, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code Y615]

Yashchenkov
Ященков (Ященко). Among the Doukhobors, Yashchenkov is a Russianization of the Ukrainian surname Yashchenko. The -v ending was added in the first half of the 19th century. This name is patronymic in origin and derives from Yashka, a diminutive form of the men's name Yakov. The Yashchenkovs (Yashchenkos) among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tavria, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Yashchenkoff, Yaschenkoff, Yashchenko, Yaschenko, Yaschen.  [Soundex Code Y252]

Yashin
Яшин. Yashin is derived from Yasha, a diminutive form of the men's name Yakov. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Kalmykov family in Elizavetpol province, Russia in the mid-19th century, whose patriarch bore this name.  [Soundex Code Y250]

Yudin
Юдин. This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Yuda. The Yudins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code Y350]

Yukin
Юкин. This patronymic surname is derived from Yuka, a diminutive form of the men's name Yuri. The Yukins among the Doukhobors originated from the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code Y250]

Yurin
Юрин. This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Yuri. There were two unrelated branches of Yurins among the Doukhobors that originated from the Don region of Russia in the 18th century and Orenburg province, Russia in the 19th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code Y650]

Yuritsin
Юрицин. This patronymic surname is derived from Yurits, a diminutive form of the men's name Yuri. The Yuritsins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Voronezh, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Youritson, Iuritsin, Yourichen, Urychen, Youritzin.  [Soundex Code Y632]

Z -

Zabrodin
Забродин. This surname is derived from the terms za ("behind", "beyond") + brod ("ford") and may refer to someone who lived beyond the ford of a river. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code Z163]

Zaichikov
Зайчиков. This surname is derived from zaichik, a diminutive form of the term zaits ("hare") meaning "small hare"
This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a hare, perhaps a swift, agile or timid person. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Tolmachev family in the Bogdanovka region of Georgia in the late 19th and early 20th century, whose patriarch bore this nickname.  [Soundex Code Z221]

Zaitsev
Зайцев. Zaitsev is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It originates from the term zaits, meaning "hare". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who resembled a hare in some respect, perhaps a swift, agile or timid individual. The Zaitsevs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. In 1970 it was found to be the nineteenth most common Doukhobor surname in Canada. lEnglish spelling variants include: Zaitseff, Zaitsoff, Zietsoff, Zaytsoff, Zaetsoff, Zeitzoff, Zaitzoff, Zaicoff, Sayzoff, Zaitsow.  [Soundex Code Z321]

Zakharov
Захаров. Zakharov is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It is patronymic in origin and is derived from the men's name Zakhar. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code Z261]

Zakharushkin
Захарушкин. Zakharushkin is derived from Zakharushka, a diminutive form of the men's name Zakhar. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Postnikov family in Elizavetpol and Kars provinces, Russia in the mid-19th century, whose patriarch bore this name.  [Soundex Code Z262]

Zamyatin
Замятин. This surname originates from the verb zamyat', meaning "to hush up".  This term may have been given as a nickname to a quiet, hushed or mute person. The Zamyatins among the Doukhobors resided in the Tobol'sk-Yenisei region of Russia in the 19th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code Z535]

Zamyatkin
Замяткин. This surname originates from the Old Russian term zamyatka, meaning "hesitation", "excitement" or "confusion". Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Petrov family in Tiflis province, Russia in the late 19th century.  [Soundex Code Z535]

Zamyatnin
Замятнин. This surname originates from the Old Russian term zamyatnya, meaning "excitement", "confusion" or "restlessness". The Zamyatnins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code Z535]

Zapasnoy
Запасной. Th
is Ukrainian surname originates from the dialect term zapasnoy, meaning "spare", "reserve" or "auxiliary".  The term may refer to a military conscript in reserve service in Old Russia. The Zapasnoys among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code Z125]

Zarshchikov
Зар
щиков (Зарщенков). Among the Doukhobors, Zarshchikov is a Russianization of the Ukrainian surname Zarshchenkov. The -enko suffix ending was modified to -ikov in the first half of the 19th century. It is derived from Zarshka, a diminutive form of several menís names including Svetozar, Nazar and Lazar.  The Zarshchikovs (Zarshchenkovs) among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Zarchikoff, Zarchakoff, Zarchicoff, Zarchukoff, Zarchekoff, Zarchukow, Zarchikow, Zarschikov, Zarchikov, Zarchukov, Zarschukov, Zarshchinkov, Zarshchenkov.  [Soundex Code Z622, Z625]

Zarubin
Зарубин.
This surname originates from the term zaruba, meaning "mark", "scar" or "notch". This term may have been given as a nickname to an individual with some distinguishing mark or scar. lEnglish spelling variants include: Sarubin, Zaroobin.  [Soundex Code Z615]

Zbitnev
Збитнев (Сбитнев).
This surname was originally written as Sbitnev and is derived from the term sbiten, a hot drink popular in Old Russia made of honey and spices. Note that this term also referred to a "well-fed", "dense" or "strong" individual. The Zbitnevs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Zbitnoff, Zbeetnieff, Sbitneff, Sbitnieff, Zbeetnoff, Zbeetneff, Bitnoff, Zbitnew, Zbitneff, Sbitnev, Zbitniff, Zbitniv, Zbitniw, Zbetinoff, Zbetnoff, Sbitney, Sbeetneff.  [Soundex Code Z135; S135]

Zdvizhkov
Здвижков.
This surname originates from the term sdvizhka, a dialect term for Vozdvisheniya Kresta ("Exaltation of the Cross"), a Russian ecclesiastical holiday celebrated on September 14th and may refer to someone born on that date.  Note that this term also refers to a "lateral" or "side" movement. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code Z312]

Zharikov
Жариков.
This surname is derived from zharkoi, the reddish-yellow color of hot coal. The resulting nickname zharik was given to someone with reddish-orange hair color. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the term zharkii, meaning "burned". The Zharikovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Zarikoff, Jarikoff, Zharikoff, Sharikoff, Zarikow, Zarikove, Zharikove.  [Soundex Code Z621]

Zhdanov
Жданов.
This surname is derived from the term zhdanii, meaning "long awaited". This term may have been given as a nickname to a long awaited child. The Zhdanovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Kostroma, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code Z351]

Zheltenkov
Желтенков (Желтенко).
Among the Doukhobors, Zheltenkov is a Russianization of the Ukrainian surname Zheltenko. The -v suffix ending was added in the second half of the 19th century. It is derived from the term zheltyi, meaning "yellow". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone with yellow (blonde) hair colour. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code Z435]

Zhernoklev
Жерноклев.
This surname originates from the dialect term zhernoklei, meaning "millstone-cutter" or "millstone-grinder". The Zhernoklevs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code Z652]

Zhikharev
Жихарев.
Zhikharev is derived from the term zhikhar, meaning a "daring", "courageous", "popular" or "merry" fellow. Note that this term also referred to a "dweller". Note that Zhikharev occurred among the Doukhobors as an official surname, and independently, as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Semenov family in Elizavetpol and Kars provinces, Russia in the mid-19th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Zikhareff, Zhikhareff, Zhikaroff.  [Soundex Code Z261]

Zhilaev
Жилаев.
This surname originates from the Old Russian term zhila, meaning "hoarder" or "grabber". Note that this term also refers to a "vein" or "artery". Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code Z351]

Zhirkhov
Жирхов.
Zhirkhov is derived from the dialect term zhirukha, meaning a "wretch", "knave" or "rogue". Note that this term also referred to a "glutton" or "fat" person. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Goncharov family in the Dmanisi region of Georgia in the late 19th and early 20th century, whose patriarch bore this nickname. [Soundex Code Z621]

Zhivotkov
Животков, Животов.
This surname, sometimes also written as Zhivotov, is derived from the term zhivot, meaning "belly". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed a large belly or girth. The Zhivotkovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Gevatkoff, Givotkoff, Gevatkow, Jevotkoff, Jivatkoff, Jiwatkoff, Zhiwatkoff, Zeewatkoff, Shiwatkoff, Jevatkoff, Zhivotkove.  [Soundex Code Z132; G132]

Zhmaev
Жмаев.
This surname is derived from the Old Russian verb zhimat' meaning "to press", "to squeeze" or "to pinch". lEnglish spelling variants include: Jmieff, Zmieff, Jmaeff, Jmaiff, Jmayoff, Zmaeff, Jmio, Zmaiff, Zmiaff, Jmiaff, Gemieff, Jemieff, Zmioff, Jamieff, Jmioff, Shmaeff, Jamaeff, Zhmayev.  [Soundex Code Z510; J510]

Zhukov
Жуков.
This surname originates from the term zhuk, meaning "beetle". Note that this term also referred to a dark-haired person. The Zhukovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code Z210]

Zhuravlev
Журавлев. This surname originates from the term zhuravl' meaning "crane". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a crane, perhaps a tall, thin man with long, spindly legs. lEnglish spelling variants include: Zhuravloff, Zuravloff, Juriloff, Jeraloff, Zaurowloff, Zurloff, Zurivloff, Zurovloff, Juravleff, Zuravlow, Juravloff, Geuroloff, Shurawleff, Zaruloff, Zhurawleff, Zhuravlev, Zhuravlove, Zhuravlov, Geroloff, Zhuravliov, Zhuravlyov.  [Soundex Code Z614; J641]

Zibarev
Зибарев.
This surname is derived from the Turkic term zibar, meaning "handsome", "well proportioned" or "pleasing to the eye". The Zibarevs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Zibareff, Zibaroff, Zebroff, Zeberoff, Ziboroff, Ziebaroff, Zeebaroff, Ziberoff, Zeebroff, Zeboroff, Zeeboroff, Zibarov, Ziborov, Ziborev, Ziberev, Ziberov, Zibarov, Zibrov, Zibarove.  [Soundex Code Z161]

Zinov'ev
Зиновьев. This patronymic surname is derived from the men's name Zinovii. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code Z511]

Zlotov
Злотов (Злоти
й). Among the Doukhobors, Zlotov is a Russianization of the Polish surname Zloty. The -ov suffix ending was added in the first half of the 20th century. It is derived from the Polish term zlot, meaning "golden". The Zlotov (Zloty) family, originally of Polish ancestry from Russian Poland, joined the Doukhobor movement in Canada after marrying into the Pykhtin family. lEnglish spelling variants include: Zlotoff.  [Soundex Code Z431]

Zolotarev
Золотарев. This surname originates from the term zolotar, meaning "goldsmith" or "gilder", a craftsman who worked with gold. Note that this term also referred to a scavenger. The Zolotarevs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code Z436]

Zubkov
Зубков.
This surname originates from zubok, a diminutive form of the term zub ("tooth") meaning "little tooth". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone that matched this physical description. lEnglish spelling variants include: Zoobkoff, Zubkoff, Zubkow, Zubkoe, Zubko.  [Soundex Code Z121]

Zubenkov
Зубенков (Зубенко).
Among the Doukhobors, Zubenkov is a Russianization of the Ukrainian surname Zubenko. The -v suffix ending was added in the second half of the 19th century. It originates from the term zub, meaning "tooth". This term may have been given as a nickname to someone with large, prominent or missing teeth. The Zubenkovs (Zubenkos) among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Zoobenkoff, Zubinkoff, Zubenkoff, Zubenkow, Zabankoff, Zubenko, Zubenkove.  [Soundex Code Z152]

Zubilov
Зубилов.
Zubilov is derived from the term zubilo, meaning "chisel". Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Zubkov family in the Dmanisi region of Georgia in the late 19th and early 20th century, whose patriarch bore this nickname. [Soundex Code Z141]

Zvezdilin
Звездилин.
This surname originates from the Old Russian term zvezdila, meaning "the fighter, from whose fists one sees stars (zvezdi)". Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code Z123]

Zvonov
Звонов.
This surname originates from the term zvon, meaning "ringing" (of bells). According to tradition, Zvonov was an early leader of the Doukhobors in Tambov province, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code Z151]

Zwick
Звик.
This German surname is derived from the term zwick, meaning "pinch". Note that this term was given to the farmer of a triangular piece of land. A Zwick family joined the Doukhobor movement in Canada after marrying into the Shcherbinin family.  [Soundex Code Z200]

 

Zybin
Зыбин.
Zybin is a relatively uncommon surname in Russia. It originates from the term zyba, meaning "cradle". It is also suggested that the name can derive from the verb zybit' meaning "to swing". In 1970 it was found to be the twentieth most common Doukhobor surname in Canada. The Zybins among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Tavria (Tauride) in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Ziebin, Zeebin, Zeeben, Zeeban, Zeiben, Zeibin, Zeabin, Sibin, Zubin, Zibin.  [Soundex Code Z150]

 


 

Notes

 

To interpret the meaning of a surname convincingly, it is necessary to trace the name backwards over the centuries. It is unwise to depend on the modern form of a surname when seeking its etymology, for it is very common for a name to have changed in such a way as to be hardly recognizable. Accordingly, I have used the original 19th century Russian (Cyrillic) spelling of each surname to determine its root and meaning. I have also sought to avoid the use of "folk" etymology, whereby the form or meaning of an obscure word is corrupted or distorted in order to resemble a more familiar, meaningful word. 

When the Doukhobors arrived in Canada in 1899, there was no standard system for transliterating Russian (Cyrillic) spellings into the English (Latin) alphabet. To complicate matters, in the South Russian dialect spoken by the Doukhobors, certain letters were capable of more than one pronounciation. Thus, the Russian letter Г may be spelt as G or H in English; the Russian letter В may be spelt as V or W in English; the Russian letter Ф may be spelt as F or Kh in English; and the Russian letter O may be spelt as O or A in English. Furthermore, most Doukhobor immigrants were illiterate and had no notion that any one spelling of their surname was more correct than another. As a consequence, the English spelling of Doukhobor surnames became largely a matter of choice, and many spelling variants arose for each name. With this in mind, I have used the standard spelling of each surname, based on the U.S. Library of Congress System, followed by English spelling variants. 

Surname spelling variants have been painstakingly compiled from a variety of sources including: local telephone directories, census returns, birth, marriage and death records, local histories, legislative gazettes, homestead records, published genealogies, books, newspapers and periodicals, most notably ISKRA magazine.

Some Doukhobor families had two names - an official surname and an unofficial, alternate surname or family nickname. The family nickname was used to distinguish between unrelated families with the same surname or different branches of the same family. Very often the family nickname was passed down to later generations, either in place of the original surname or in addition to it. Some branches might then keep the original surname, and some might adopt the family nickname. After several generations, it was not uncommon to completely lose the memory of the original surname, or to forget which was the original and which was the family nickname.

The Soundex is a coded last name (surname) index based on the way a name sounds rather than the way it is spelled. Surnames that sound the same, but are spelled differently, like Zubkov, Zubkoff, Zubkove and Zoobkoff, have the same code and are filed together. The Soundex coding system was developed so that you can find a surname even though it may have been recorded under various spellings. Knowing a surname's Soundex code is useful and important, since many public archives, libraries and other institutions use Soundex-based finding aids and research tools.

 


 

Bibliography

  • Benson, M., Dictionary of Russian Personal Names (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1964).
  • Bogdan, F., Dictionary of Ukrainian Surnames in Canada (Winnipeg: UVAN, 1974).
  • Dal, V.I., Tolkovyi Slovar Zhivogo Velikorusskago Iazyka (Moscow, 1999).
  • Fedosiuk, Y.A., Russkie Familii: Populiarnii Etomologicheskii Slovar (Moscow, 1996).
  • Hande, D., Changes of Name: The Saskatchewan Gazette 1917-1950 (Regina: Saskatchewan Genealogical Society, 1993).
  • Inikova, S.A., Correspondence to J. Kalmakoff re: Doukhobors, 1995-present.
  • Inikova, S.A., O Dukhoborcheskikh Familiakh in ISKRA No.1889 (Grand Forks: U.S.C.C., March 29, 2000).
  • Khalikov, A. Kh., 500 Ruski Familii c Bulgaro-Tatarski Prouzkhog (Sofia, 1993).
  • Kroutikhin, Mikhail, Correspondence to J. Kalmakoff re: Surnames, 1998-present.
  • Lapshinoff, S., List of Doukhobors Living in Saskatchewan in 1905 (Crescent Valley: 1996). 
  • National Archives of Canada, Immigration Branch, Central Regristry Files (RG 76, Volumes 183 to 185, Parts 1 to 14)     Microfilm Reel Nos. C-7337 to C-7341. 
  • Nikonov, V.A., Slovar Russkikh Familii (Moscow: 1993).
  • Petrovskii, N.A., Slovar Russkikh Lichnikh Imen (Moscow, 1968).
  • Popoff, E.A., Stories From Doukhobor History (Grand Forks: USCC, 1992).
  • Popoff, E.A., Memo to J. Kalmakoff Re: Doukhobors on the 1905 Voyage of the SS Southwark, October 15, 1999.
  • Popoff, J.E., Doukhobor History Quiz in ISKRA No.1633 (Grand Forks: U.S.C.C., December 3, 1986).
  • Popoff, J.E., Doukhobor History Quiz in ISKRA No.1670 (Grand Forks: U.S.C.C., September 7, 1988).
  • Saskatchewan Archives Board, Regina Branch, Microfilm Reel No. R.2.46.
  • Saskatchewan Gazette 1950-1965 (Regina: Saskatchewan Queen's Printer).
  • Unbegaun, B.O., Russian Surnames (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1972).

This article was reproduced by permission in ISKRA Nos.1904-1911 (Grand Forks: U.S.C.C., 2001).